Other Amps

I want an amp

26

Supro 1605 reverb. 5w and loads of options for an all tube amp. Just under a grand which is a lot for a small amp but it does loads

27

I'd second the Egantor Tweaker.

I'd get the head version and play it through a 1x12 cab...use something like a Jensen C12N for the speaker.

Different pedals work well with it.

28

Wow. A lot of good suggestions. Thanks for all of the input, greatly appreciated.

A lot of amps I hadn’t considered and a few I’d never heard of. Time for more research and test drives. I’ll have to rely on youtube for some.

A honey pot indeed. Too much choice can be a bad thing. It can lead to indecision. There are worse problems to have.

29

Finding "The" amp can be like looking for the Holy Grail.

Enjoy the hunt!

30

I have been playing since the early 60' and have played through many amps. I tried solid state amps but never liked them so I'm a tube guy. I have played through Marshall, Fender, Orange and Hiwatt amps and I like them all but most have been too loud. With the advent of channel switching I have been able to keep my volume reasonable. Solid state amps never did, and still don't provide you with the sound of a tube amp especially when soloing.

31

Go cheap and cheerful, or take the plunge and build your own, Most fender designs will give you plenty of versatility Buying a boutique amp is like buying anything with 'marine' written on the label. I wouldn't spend more than $2-500 on a small amp to play around the house. (I wouldn't even do that as I can build one if I want from scavenged organ parts )

32

I have exactly three amps these days. My old, reliable and tough as nails Roland JC, the original Beltone 10W that my parents bought me in 1968 and a little practice box in the form of a Roland JS-8, which occupies a small piece of the floor behind my chair in the living room and comes out to play almost daily. (usually through headphones).

They're small, you can jam with built-in backing trax (not the best) and rhythms (which do help you stay in time) or using the built-in USB connection, play along with virtually anything you can put on a memory stick in 44K mode. The fact it has a full COSM modelling patch in it is just a bonus. I play clean for the most part, and there are several clean modes that suit each of my guitars- even the newish Taylor!

Have a read...

http://ca.boss.info/product...

Since I bought this little toy my other amps have largely gathered dust unless needed for out-of-the-house work.

33

You may want a low watt Tweed style amp. I guess that can mean a Tweed Champ but they are costly.

– ThePolecats

I built a Champ from a kit for under 500 all in. Still too loud for an apartment.

34

find you an old Gibson GA-15RVT from 1966. they have reverb and tremolo built in already. I've had mine since 1966. it's been a good amp.

35

If you like the yamaha -- and I agree, it's a near-perfect bedroom amp -- you may want to look at it's bigger brothers: http://www.guitarworld.com/...

I agree that that the PR sounds pretty perfect for what you want, but I also think it's 15 watts may be a bit much for the home. Depends on the speaker, and the tolerance of your neighbors. In a tube amp, I suspect you'd be happier in the 5-10 watt range, which can still be a lot for the house.

I agree with Roadjunkie, it would definitely be worth a call to Jer at DeLisle or some other folks. You will definitely be surprised what they can do for you.

And the quilter's really are very very nice.

So yeah, i like most all the above suggestions

36

That's why you put a VVR circuit into a PR. Plenty of crunch at bedroom levels.

37

That's why you put a VVR circuit into a PR. Plenty of crunch at bedroom levels.

– Powdog

That is one heck of a lovely amp....if it sounds as good as it looks, it is surely a winner!

38

A good PR is almost the perfect amp. Do a couple things to it and it is the perfect amp. This one has a 12" Weber P12N, a larger OT, a switchable fixed bias/cathode bias and a VVR circuit. Covers a lot of ground.

39

Thanks for the mention, fellas!

I was going for the Robinson / Ford era Crowes sound when I developed the Nickel Box. Some people use it for jazz. Go figure

5W through 12" speaker and large cab is more than plenty at my house. But higher watts are fairly easy to tame in bedroom settings. The de Lisle Variodyne is linearly variable from <1W to full power. It controls both the DC operating voltages in the power amp and incoming signal voltages with one knob. And there's no high voltage DC on the pot

40

Thanks for the mention, fellas!

I was going for the Robinson / Ford era Crowes sound when I developed the Nickel Box. Some people use it for jazz. Go figure

5W through 12" speaker and large cab is more than plenty at my house. But higher watts are fairly easy to tame in bedroom settings. The de Lisle Variodyne is linearly variable from <1W to full power. It controls both the DC operating voltages in the power amp and incoming signal voltages with one knob. And there's no high voltage DC on the pot

– mugsy

I myself was thinking of the double nickle with the variodyne for the OP. I still find reverb not needed and somewhat redundant in a single ended amp killing the natural harmonics plus it keeps the price under a grand.


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