Other Amps

Have any of you tried the Celestion X200 flat-response speaker?

1

It's designed for digital modeling amps, and the flat response allows it to be used with IR's/cab emulations, since you don't want to put a speaker-emulated output into a standard guitar speaker, or it will sound like snot.

I have a Marshall Code 100 head that I will be gigging with this year and I'm looking into this.

https://celestion.com/produ...

2

man, I thought this was about Flat Earth for second! I have one of these speakers in my cue w a supplier right now. quite tempted to use it with my Two Note box

3

man, I thought this was about Flat Earth for second! I have one of these speakers in my cue w a supplier right now. quite tempted to use it with my Two Note box

– TheNocturneBrain

My guess is that there are not a lot of people who have tried this speaker yet. It seems fairly new and I could not find any on the used market.

4

A flat-response speaker is moot without a flat-response amp driving it.

It's not clear to me from the specs that the Code 100's power amp is (or can be configured) to be such a thing. The specs say it has power amp models, but not that one of them is the pure flat-response engine you'd need. If the C100 "expects" a speaker with some version of a typical guitar speaker response curve, what you get out of an FR speaker may not be the tones you intend.

5

This is the first I've heard of it, but I have a speaker with a much-flatter-than-usual frequency response curve, the Eminence Wheelhouse, and it's magnificent. I use it with a Quilter 101 Mini Reverb, and it really helps with my more trebly guitars, especially Teles. It's not the same effect I'd get from turning down the treble, btw.

6

A flat-response speaker is moot without a flat-response amp driving it.

It's not clear to me from the specs that the Code 100's power amp is (or can be configured) to be such a thing. The specs say it has power amp models, but not that one of them is the pure flat-response engine you'd need. If the C100 "expects" a speaker with some version of a typical guitar speaker response curve, what you get out of an FR speaker may not be the tones you intend.

– Proteus

You read my mind. If a modeler is voiced to go through a guitar speaker, then presumably it's going to sound best through a guitar speaker. Maybe this is a product intended to spur some innovation in modeling and free up designers from having to cater to specific speakers.

7

There are lots of FRFR amps/speakers catering to the Kemper crowd. Good to see Celestion getting in on the action, even if it seems a decade late.

8

A flat-response speaker is moot without a flat-response amp driving it.

It's not clear to me from the specs that the Code 100's power amp is (or can be configured) to be such a thing. The specs say it has power amp models, but not that one of them is the pure flat-response engine you'd need. If the C100 "expects" a speaker with some version of a typical guitar speaker response curve, what you get out of an FR speaker may not be the tones you intend.

– Proteus

The amp itself has cab emulations built-in. They sound great DI into a P.A. system, or for recording, but through a normal guitar speaker they sound weird (I have the head version of the amp - the combo versions are loaded with a generic Celestion). I just shut the cab sims off going through a normal speaker, but then I'm not utilizing the onboard emulations, which I'd like to do.

That Celestion X200 is supposed to be able to work well with cab sims or IR's due to the flat response curve, as most other speakers roll off the high, and have other EQ curve characteristics which color the tone.

If any of you are familiar with any similar-type speakers that might be more affordable, please let me know. THANKS!!

9

Well yes, you'd definitely turn off the cab emulations. But the specs I read suggest it also has power amp models (as distinct from amp models and cab emulations); as you wouldn't want any coloration from a power amp, you would want to bypass those as well. Which would raise the question whether the Code 100's power amp (distinct from models of a power amp) is FRFR. It may be, I just don't know.

But the truth is always in the sound. Sometimes cab emulations into a combo amp sound good (if not as intended). I have pretty good luck using the power amp sections of combo amps with the output from modelers and the Kemper - ie, out of those into the effect return of the guitar amps.

But in that case, I'm still using the speakers which were presumably matched to the power amp sections of the amps.

I haven't looked at the price of the Celestion, but FRFR cabs tend to be pretty expensive.

10

Well yes, you'd definitely turn off the cab emulations. But the specs I read suggest it also has power amp models (as distinct from amp models and cab emulations); as you wouldn't want any coloration from a power amp, you would want to bypass those as well. Which would raise the question whether the Code 100's power amp (distinct from models of a power amp) is FRFR. It may be, I just don't know.

But the truth is always in the sound. Sometimes cab emulations into a combo amp sound good (if not as intended). I have pretty good luck using the power amp sections of combo amps with the output from modelers and the Kemper - ie, out of those into the effect return of the guitar amps.

But in that case, I'm still using the speakers which were presumably matched to the power amp sections of the amps.

I haven't looked at the price of the Celestion, but FRFR cabs tend to be pretty expensive.

– Proteus

I think the Marshall Code's power amp is simply a 100W Class D solid state. There are no cooling vents on it, indicating that it produces very little heat, which sounds like Class D. My guess is no coloration at all from the actual power amp; it simply amplifies the digital pre/power/cab emulation signal.

11

The Marshall folks have engineered a cab. No Thiele calculations needed, just some plywood. Tempting.....

13

I hate how every demo has to have some dude w a raging headbanger sound.. Some of us dont give a flying shit about your chug machine. The hardest thing it feels like, is for an emulator to produce REAL sounding clean tube amp tones. My helix was crap for clean sounds and my Two Note at present is ok using the power amp of my Pro Block 202 but thats into regular guitar cabs

14

I hate how every demo has to have some dude w a raging headbanger sound.. Some of us dont give a flying shit about your chug machine. The hardest thing it feels like, is for an emulator to produce REAL sounding clean tube amp tones. My helix was crap for clean sounds and my Two Note at present is ok using the power amp of my Pro Block 202 but thats into regular guitar cabs

– TheNocturneBrain

What I've noticed from watching a ton of videos is that people who like a good clean sound believe that emulators have trouble with clean sounds; those who like "edge of breakup" seem to say that edge of breakup is where modelers are weak; and those who like a heavy tone say that heavy tones are where you can really tell is digital is any good - most of these people seem to prefer tube amps, but I think what is happening is that since people like a certain type of tone, their ears are much more acute to it than others, and therefore are far more in tune to that particular sound.


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