Vintage Gretsch Guitars

The first Country Gent - Vintage Guitar Magazine

1

I received my electronic VG teaser this morning and there was a nice article on the first Country Gent and I thought I'd share it. Link

2

I noticed it is written by Ed Ball. Thanks for posting it Bear.

3

Actually that article helped to ferret-out yet another of the rare prototypical 2-tone Gents. The earliest example, noted in the article is from the #233xx batch. This newly discovered guitar was a little later, and the one the article featured was the first serial number from the debut production batch (#26400). The two earlier specimens both have plugged holes on the respective guitar's top... evidence of experiments with knob placement. The knobs are still in different positions when comparing the (now three) guitars. The #264xx guitar has no plugged holes in it's top, and was perhaps the result of the previous experimental examples. My guess is there are a couple more of these out there, based on some word of mouth legend of one sighted with the faux f-holes at one point. These are really cool, and provide insight into the Gretsch laboratory of guitar development in the late 1950s.

I just checked out the VG mag site, and someone needs to tell them that they've mis-spelled "Gretsch" in the article's title!

4

Actually that article helped to ferret-out yet another of the rare prototypical 2-tone Gents. The earliest example, noted in the article is from the #233xx batch. This newly discovered guitar was a little later, and the one the article featured was the first serial number from the debut production batch (#26400). The two earlier specimens both have plugged holes on the respective guitar's top... evidence of experiments with knob placement. The knobs are still in different positions when comparing the (now three) guitars. The #264xx guitar has no plugged holes in it's top, and was perhaps the result of the previous experimental examples. My guess is there are a couple more of these out there, based on some word of mouth legend of one sighted with the faux f-holes at one point. These are really cool, and provide insight into the Gretsch laboratory of guitar development in the late 1950s.

I just checked out the VG mag site, and someone needs to tell them that they've mis-spelled "Gretsch" in the article's title!

– kc_eddie_b

I wonder if the one with faux holes were the large size of a 6120.

5

Reading your great book Ed the thing that got me was how little Country Gents were made during the late 50's.

But i was just as surprised by the low numbers on a lot of other models too,most interesting .

6

JCHiggy... I agree! I feel like that production info is one of the more valuable deliverables of this book. If you think about it, we've never had production data for Gretsch guitars, and since "value" of a collectible tends to be based on supply vs. demand, it will be interesting to see if we recognize any adjustments in vintage Gretsch values now that we have access to "supply" data.

7

Great article Edward and solid info all around! Thanks for sharing Bear...

8

That was a a good read, thanks bear, Ed

9

I noticed it is written by Ed Ball. Thanks for posting it Bear.

– BuddyHollywood

I'm sorry about forgetting to add that in my initial post. Sorry Ed.

10

Reading your great book Ed the thing that got me was how little Country Gents were made during the late 50's.

But i was just as surprised by the low numbers on a lot of other models too,most interesting .

– JCHiggy

JC,

Yes, that is one of the most important aspects of Mr Ball's recent book i.e. that these instruments are rare.

Yours

Drew


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