On the 'tube

What makes this song great - Led Zep - Watch before it’s taken down

1

Whole Lotta Love, broken down. This probably won't stay long before it's flagged by YT.

2

Excellent, thanks very much

3

Bad ass. Soloing the “caveman” drum fills into triplets is loads of fun. These fills influenced my playing.

4

Yeah that was a nice look into the tune. I was 11 when this came out, I was lucky to have a brother that was three years older so I got to hear things I might not normally find for myself. The first few times I heard this song it scared me to the point I couldn't sleep. My brother and I shared a bedroom and his stereo was between our beds. The first time I listened to this was about 10pm and that was it I was up all night, horror movie adrenaline scared. I couldn't get the Theremin out of my head combined with the screams made it super dark and haunting. Then after a couple nights I was hooked and this song is probably the reason I play guitar. I wanted to figure out where those sounds came from and how it's possible to get a guitar to sound like that.

5

I guess it’s not the lyrics.

6

It's just a love song... Anti Good Vibrations I guess.

7

How does he extract the different instruments in such a clean way? Anybody familiar with the tools used for that?

8

How does he extract the different instruments in such a clean way? Anybody familiar with the tools used for that?

– blueflame

I wondered that myself. Perhaps he had access to the original tapes where he was able to more easily isolate the various parts.

9

Yep, I learned a lot from Jimmy Page. Second "lead solo" I ever learned was "Livin' Lovin' Maid" (after the intro to "No Time"), and I spent a whole lotta time on "Whole Lotta" before trying to climb "Stairway." Not that I ever got the timing right (or ever will, on anything of anyone else's I play).

One also learned the riffs that went with the songs - though the intricacies of "Black Dog" dogged me down, and I didn't figure out "Kashmir" till youtube came along (before that, I considered the song too magical, too mysterious to sully by actually playing it). I also spent a lot of time on the acoustic stuff: "Babe I'm Gonna Leave," songs from III, "Over the Hills," and of course "Stairway."

I don't think I ever ever considered Page my favorite guitarist - or even a "good" guitarist, when considered in technical terms. Clapton, Beck, Green, Gilmour, and so many others seemed to me cleaner in execution. But I could never deny the power of his imagination - the riffs and the layering and studio texturing. Nor - as demonstrated on the live triple set How The West Was Won (but NOT the live concert movie) - his monstrous swaggering live groove, and how much sonic space one little guitar (and a few stacks) took up in a giant room with just two other instruments and thousands (or tens of thousands) of concert-goers. He taught the guitar division of the How to Own the Room 101 course.

There was a time it was a hip thing to disavow one's youthful devotion to Led Zeppelin, to consider them dinosaurs of excess and even posers, and to decry their influence on the hard rock that came after - which was often too long on swagger and prowess and too short on ideas. But as the years have passed, Zeppelin has emerged as not only a template for later hard rock (so were Sabbath and Purple), but as utterly unique in their composition, groove, delivery, embrace of odd and fractured time signatures, even variety of influences - the way their recordings subsumed microtonal and other "world" music influences into rock. JPJ's and Bonham's musical skill sets - but also their sensibilities and dispositions - were indispensable to that, as was Plant's preening and keening. (And what a rich and enriching post-Zep career Percy has had.)

A thing unto themselves is the mighty Zep, similar to the Beatles in that each unique member is so important, none remotely replaceable, all creating a whole greater than the sum of its parts.

All these years later, I hear more JP in my playing than I ever would have intended - or even wanted, like I soaked it up osmotically. Especially the messiness. Jimmy threw off clouds of crumbs like Charlie Brown's Pigpen, all in the process of carving out what he was going for - the going-for-it being the point. (Steve Howe too, for that matter.)

The messiness. That's the part I learned best. Now I can't even help it - doesn't matter how meticulously I practice to execute cleanly. It's gonna be a mess. It's not fun if there's not some mess.

10

That was interesting. Never knew that a theremin was used, always assumed it was some sonic feedback/whammy bar wackiness. As to his isolation of tracks, I know that on some things he has access to the master tapes. I think on others he uses studio/protools magic to get close. The one he does on steely dan's kid charlemagne is really cool.

11

I dare any guitar player to say they weren't influenced in some way by Jimmy.

The drum tracks are intense! Bonham was amazing with great attack and timing.

I remember my 2nd grade music teacher had a device back in the early 70's that he could put the record on the record player and separate the vocals and certain instruments. I always wondered how that was done.

12

I played guitar in a Led Zeppelin tribute band for several years, and learned a huge number of Zeppelin songs. Jimmy Page was a master song writer, and would make timing changes right in the middle of riffs (think Black Dog). I owe a huge amount of my guitar playing skills, to my years in that band. There is new band out called Greta Van Fleet, they've been accused of sounding too much like Led Zeppelin, but I beg to differ. I'm a total Greta Van Fleet supporter, because they're bringing rock music back, kicking it old school! Zeppelin was far more sophisticated than Greta Van Fleet, the only real similaritie I hear, is that they have a singer with a tremendous vocal range. These are young men 19 - 22 years old (3 of them are brothers), they're a 3 piece band and a killer singer. The reason we're still talking about Led Zeppelin 50 years later, is that it was just very good blues based rock music! I still listen to the them, fairly often.

13

I was a secret fan of Zep in the 80's, had to be as a Straycats wannabe band in high school. More so because my parents deemed them satanic. Rightly so I guess w Page's obsession w Crowley and living in his house built on the haunted grounds where christians were burned to death in a church... Strangely Plant's son died and then Bonham... Both perhaps offerings to the dark lord... ???

Seriously thanks for this video, I'm going to totally lose my mind binging ALL his stuff.

14

I played guitar in a Led Zeppelin tribute band for several years, and learned a huge number of Zeppelin songs. Jimmy Page was a master song writer, and would make timing changes right in the middle of riffs (think Black Dog). I owe a huge amount of my guitar playing skills, to my years in that band. There is new band out called Greta Van Fleet, they've been accused of sounding too much like Led Zeppelin, but I beg to differ. I'm a total Greta Van Fleet supporter, because they're bringing rock music back, kicking it old school! Zeppelin was far more sophisticated than Greta Van Fleet, the only real similaritie I hear, is that they have a singer with a tremendous vocal range. These are young men 19 - 22 years old (3 of them are brothers), they're a 3 piece band and a killer singer. The reason we're still talking about Led Zeppelin 50 years later, is that it was just very good blues based rock music! I still listen to the them, fairly often.

– Wade H

My younger Brother was recently added as the Guitarist for ZEPPELIN USA, they put on a great show. Its a dream role for him as He was always a die hard Led Zeppelin Fan. Its amazing how popular the "Tribute Bands" are, especially in Las Vegas. I agree that Jimmy Page was a trailblazer in a lot of ways, some may say sloppy, but try doing some of that stuff. I was lucky enough to see them tour in 1969 in my Home Town of Pasadena. They were scruffy and experimental, but look where they ended up. Individually they were very talented, together they created a Monster Library of music and Rock n Roll shows IMO.

15

I love it when he solos the John Bonham drum tracks. He's saying there is some echo on the drums but I only hear ghost notes that he is playing with some room reverb.

16

That was completely entertaining! Thanks! Is it just me or does he have a little Anthony Bourdain vibe going on there?

17

That was completely entertaining! Thanks! Is it just me or does he have a little Anthony Bourdain vibe going on there?

– Jopapa

Let’s hope not...

18

My younger Brother was recently added as the Guitarist for ZEPPELIN USA, they put on a great show. Its a dream role for him as He was always a die hard Led Zeppelin Fan. Its amazing how popular the "Tribute Bands" are, especially in Las Vegas. I agree that Jimmy Page was a trailblazer in a lot of ways, some may say sloppy, but try doing some of that stuff. I was lucky enough to see them tour in 1969 in my Home Town of Pasadena. They were scruffy and experimental, but look where they ended up. Individually they were very talented, together they created a Monster Library of music and Rock n Roll shows IMO.

– 949Norm

Oh man, how cool! I bet he's 10 miles high right now, what fun! I'd have to say that I had my dream come true as well. I'd always been a Led Zeppelin fanatic, and already knew a huge selection of their portfolio when I auditioned. It was a couple of years after I got out of the service, and I was still reasonably young and fit. It was very demanding work and I burned out in about 3 and a half years. The music scene was changing and rock bands had fewer and fewer places to play, competition for venues got very fierce. I hope that your brother will enjoy his time playing Jimmy as much as I did. I wore some pretty deep low spots on the frets of my Les Paul playing those gigs. I also ruined my first marriage (but that's another story)

19

Many thanks for posting this. I love Zeppelin and this is one of my all time favorites. I noticed everything he highlighted, questioned what the hell was making the noise (and of course guessed incorrectly) as I now know what a Theremin is, questioned everything I heard, and now I have answers!

The only thing I knew was it was Willie Dixon's and remember that when I learned of it, was not surprised.

The video is a gem, all of the posts add to the magic of it. Oh, and yes, Proteus' post managed to collect my thoughts and communicate them for me exactly how I would like to have posted it! Should I be surprised though? Tim is a gift in so many ways that I feel fortunate just to read his spelling mistakes (he's human so he has to have them although this is a complete guess) and all his magnificent input.

Awesome.

21

Yeah baby! That boy can play them drums!

22

Very cool!
But what I don’t understand is that he misses one of the most important parts of what makes the opening riff so cool and powerful. I hardly ever hear anyone playing the riff right.

There is a clear dissonance in the D note that is played in the riff (B-D-B-D) before going to the E chord. He does that by bending the D on the 5th string up and simultaneously playing the 4th open D string. You hear it very clearly in the first line before the bass kicks in. IMO that’s what makes the opening riff so powerful and scary!

23

Yeah baby! That boy can play them drums!

– Wade H

That’s a little girl and she RAWKS! Here’s another clip showing her remarkable right foot.

24

This video was the focus of a thread I started a couple of months ago called, "You play drums like an 8 year old girl!". Check out the giggle at the end.

I'm amazed that the Zep video is still active. The video Rick Beato did that broke down a Fleetwood Mac song lasted a matter of hours before being removed by YouTube.

25

He's got some interesting stuff. I've definitely learned things watching a few of his posts, Thanks


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