On the 'tube

This made me happy.

1

This will (should) cure whatever ails you.

2

"Freebird" was the Graduation song for my wife's Westfield, NJ Class of '76.

4

Thanks. I needed that. It was also the theme to my high-school grad too. Hadn't listened to it in years. The kids are all right.

6

I was laughing so hard! His reaction is amazing!

7

It gives hope on many levels.

I’ve been in a bit of reflective funk lately and seeing this brought the sun out. A tune that we’ve all kind of dismissed but recognized it was a great one. It might have been my graduation song, don’t know because I didn’t attend. Anyhoo fast forward to this guy and his generation that didn’t hear it every ten minutes and we get to see the reaction most of us had, maybe not that dramatic on the outside.

I think there’s some hope but we need help from the people that control the media.

8

I remember thinking “is this song ever gonna end.”

But I loved Collings and Rossington trading off leads. Later on when I saw them live it was a three guitar attack that was pure poetry.

Lots of bands from that era seem to have been reduced to a punchline, but at the time those songs tightened your gut, got you on your feet and inspired you to pick up a guitar.

9

Sweet Home Freebird! Great reaction to an iconic tune!

11

A quick study on the rise and popularity of Reaction Videos and the controversies surrounding them might be good about now...not that I want to rain down on anyone's happiness...but you know me I'm a caring guy always looking out for my fellow human beings.

12

Could it be good theater, hell yeah but if it is I’ll take fake happy over fake news everyday.

“We got the bubble-headed-bleach-blond Who comes on at five She can tell you 'bout the plane crash with a gleam in her eye”.

13

Awesome!

I remember asking a girl to slow dance to Free Bird.

What the hell was I thinking?

14

Cool. Has anyone ever NOT played air guitar to Freebird? Never saw Lynyrd Skynyrd, but John Michael Montgomery tore the house up with his version at a concert several years ago.

15

I'm real happy to say I caught THIS TOUR, you know the REAL band and all. A local radio station that was part time and a solid station had played a show from a local night club a couple years prior so it was easy to hear that they were a solid band. And a kid in my class knew more about the band than the band did I think.

General admission at The Aragon, we were 7th row stage left, they played less than an hour and when they finished it was a little like a hurricane passed through. I think that the Climax blues band opened up but I don't remember that at all but I remember the headliner like it was yesterday.

16

That was hilarious! "Lynrd Skynrd, Ya'll some playahs!" I about lost it!

17

There are still bars and fraternal clubs in the midwest which, as a sort of secular church (with services on Saturday night) serve all the social, personal, and even spiritual purposes of the church churches whose doors their habitués rarely darken. Beer is the communion sacrament. Lynyrd Skynyrd is the greatest of the jubilee choirs, and Free Bird is a hymn of redemption. The puerile lyrics raise the rejection of adult responsibility to a positive virtue, making the same misty-eyed plea that the Monkees' I Wanna Be Free packaged so much more sweetly: that mens have some yearning right to love'm and leave'm without emotional or other consequence. I could never tell if the bodies were swaying and the lighters were being raised as congregants warmly remembered the sense of possibility and freedom they felt before they took on, stumbled into, or were ensnared in responsible adulthood - or whether the sentiment of the song reflected what hope they still nursed of ever breaking free.

But I think people respond to something that transcends the prosaic (and oh-so male-privileged) context of the actual lyrics. Given the sombre portent of the liturgical intro - and the spiraling repetitive ecstasy of the soaring triple-guitar ascension at the end - the emotional arc of the song (like the equally iconic Stairway) suggests an archetypal hero's quest, journey through trial and darkness, and final victory. It's Black Friday through Easter Sunday summed up in song for the irreligious - but delivered in the universal terms of music for anyone capable of responding to music, regardless of race creed color religion or orientation. It uncovers and awakens hope.


Mr Trouble! Sean? Good to see you posting. It's been a long time. (If it's a different Mr Trouble, howdy to you as well.)

18

In 1979 and 1980 I was in a band that toured all around the South. No matter which tiny town honkytonk or beach resort we were playing, someone would, around the third round, 10:30 or so, call out for Freebird. We soon grew tired of the song and would announce Freebird and play Cocaine instead. No one complained, the lighters went up just the same and everyone yelled “Cocaine” at the right spot.

19

I've aways been partial to this version (from the fine folks who brought us "Smoke Two Joints").

20

Just stood up and left. Nothing else to say.....

21

It gives hope on many levels.

I’ve been in a bit of reflective funk lately and seeing this brought the sun out. A tune that we’ve all kind of dismissed but recognized it was a great one. It might have been my graduation song, don’t know because I didn’t attend. Anyhoo fast forward to this guy and his generation that didn’t hear it every ten minutes and we get to see the reaction most of us had, maybe not that dramatic on the outside.

I think there’s some hope but we need help from the people that control the media.

– Curt Wilson

I was feeling the same way. Until.

I watched a special on TV monday night- "The Queen and Adam Lambert Story".

Now... I'm not a "fan" of Lambert. He's an amazing singer (Roger Taylor thinks he's literally the best singer on the PLANET), but I'm a HUGE Queen fan. While there is only EVER ONE Freddie Mercury, I have to say, Lambert really is the only guy who could pull off fronting Queen nowadays (all due respect to Paul Rodgers, who I also love). He's too theatrical and "broadway" for me, but there's no denying the guy can sing his ass off.

Here's the cool part: because Adam Lambert, who rose to fame through the American Idol show, is singing for Queen, a NEW GENERATION is getting exposed to Queen, and learning what REAL ROCK AND ROLL actually is. It did my heart mighty good to see that.

There may not be hope for the government, country, or planet, LOL.... but I'm praying there's still hope for RNR.

22

Song that defined an era still holds up, haven't heard it in a while. Nice to see it being rediscovered. Well worth the watch/smile , thanks

23

I'll have to admit, as much as I love Skynrd, I have avoided that song like the plague for years. Just like Stairway to heaven. Overplayed so many times that every note is embedded into my soul. listening to it this time with this young gentleman's narrative was wonderful fun.

24

I know alot (if not all) reaction videos are staged but I'll applaud anyone who's not afraid to step out their (musical) bubble.


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