On the 'tube

The Human Synthesesse, or How to Sing Harmony With Yourself, or …

1

... Adventures in Overtone Series? I've heard polyphonic singing before - as in Tuvan throat singing. This is a whole nother level of control.

But that's all just click-baity phraseology; there's a lot more going on with Anna Maria than her one freaky skill.

The best place to start for an orientation overview is the 4th vid down. (And the very first is not one of my favorites.) But I promise if you watch all these videos, she'll take you far far away.

https://anna-maria-hefele.c...

2

I’m able to do something similar if I eat beans and sauerkraut before a gig.

3

This just blew my mind! I watched the 4th video first, and just had to see the rest of them. As well as her freakishly odd vocal technique, Anna Maria's harp playing is very accomplished and beautiful, it's something that we rarely see/hear in modern pop music. Very enjoyable, thank you for sharing, Tim, it gave me a Sunday daybreak smile!

4

Speechless.

5

In a good way.

7

The Lady & The Cat for the win....for me anyway.

8

+1 for Lady and the Cat... And tthat MRI imaging one is pretty wild.

It's a wild skill, and has that strange alien quality. I couldn't help thinking of this singer — only Anna Maria is real.

Inva Mulla in The Fifth Element

9

My favorite is "Ritus," with the other players. I love it when acoustic instruments sound exotic / "alien."

10

Okay, that's uncanny. She does remarkable things with her pipes and whether it sounds good or not that's very talented. (video #4)

When I was recording my most recent album, there was a song of mine, that when I was singing it, I had this same effect and it wasn't good. We had to stop and listen to my isolated vocal channel. We were all like WTH? So evidently I have the ability to do this, but not the control. I had to re approach the way I was singing that song.

11

This is how it works apparently. 'Resonant cavities' we can 'control'. I'm pretty pleased if I hit a third straight off.

*Overtone singing – also known as overtone chanting, harmonic singing, or throat singing – is a type of singing in which the singer manipulates the resonances created in the vocal tract, in order to produce additional overtones above the fundamental note being sung.

From a fundamental pitch, made by the human voice, the belonging harmonic overtones can be selectively amplified by changing the shape of the resonant cavities of the mouth, larynx, and pharynx.[1] This resonant tuning allows singers to create more than one pitch at the same time (the fundamental and one or more selected overtones), while actually generating only a single fundamental frequency with their vocal folds.

Each note is like a rainbow of sound. When you shoot a light beam through a prism, you get a rainbow. You think of a rainbow of sounds when you sing one note. If you can use your throat as a prism, you can expose the rainbow – through positioning the throat in a certain physical way, which will reveal the harmonic series note by note.

— Jenni Roditi, The Secret Life of the Universe: The Quest for the Soul of Science, Amy Corzine (2012) [2]*


Register Sign in to join the conversation