On the 'tube

The History of the Guitar & Guitar Legends: From 1929 to 1979

1

I haven't watched this yet, I'll check back when I have. Would be interested to hear about any others you might like to add (the programme maker admits up front it's inevitable people will wish to disagree/amend.

http://www.openculture.com/...

2

I’ve written (and rewritten) three or four snappy replies to the learned Mr. Beato, but then I realized it just doesn’t matter and skipped it altogether.

3

More like a walk through Mr Beato’s jazz and rock record collection...

I know these things are subjective and everyone’s point of view is likely to be different, but I’ve never even heard of some of these guys - and not even a passing mention of Duane. Scotty and Eddie just about scraped in, but no James Burton, no Hank Garland. No Grady Martin.

I mean, really...?

If this list was entitled “My 20 Favourite Guitarists” then go ahead, knock yourself out. But to refer to it as a list of the most influential guitarists means you have to stand back and be neutral.

4

I’ve written (and rewritten) three or four snappy replies to the learned Mr. Beato, but then I realized it just doesn’t matter and skipped it altogether.

– Deed Eddy

You can't tell know-it-all types anything.

5

What a terribly poor video!!! I left a lengthy comment review on the You Tube page of his video. What a presumptuous ass.

7

I read the article but didn't watch the video. Deke got it right; a walk through his record collection. If these are players that we, "need to know", that to me suggests that they have influenced the development of guitar playing. What other reason could the statement imply?

Some on the list are influential, for sure. Segovia elevated the classical guitar from a place of low status in that world to one of respect, and he contributed greatly to the repertoire by arranging a large number of compositions not initially composed for the instrument. He also edited methods and taught.

Charlie Christian, Wes Montgomery, Jim Hall....all very influential and developed unique and innovative approaches to the instrument and in Jim's case, to an innovative approach to improvisation. Herb Ellis and Tal Farlow......you know, they were both great players and we can say that they developed personal approaches to playing jazz guitar and I don't mean to diminish their stature as performers, but influential they were not. The west-side Chicago guys...absolutely.

People have their favorites so I won't mention names, but in some cases, polished, marketed mediocrity reins supreme; they're very lucky people.

8

Lists of these kinds are always just someone's opinion, and usually biased, uneducated, and unqualified to paint with such a broad brush. I used to get all upset and reply with lengthy rebuttals, but the energy and time can be better utilized in other ways, particularly in spending more time with grand kids and playing guitar. Best, most popular, most influential, most likely to be remembered in history, etc., are all highly subjective.

His opinion, my opinion, and most likely yours, are all quite different. Moving on.

9

The guy is an extremely successful advanced guitar theory educator - not my thing but I'm not so smart. He's got some standing. Point being, lists are for entertainment. I can't imagine getting too worked up in either direction. He makes his case and talks about players that for the most part I admire, although you could end at 38 for me. Listening to other educated opinions about the guitar has value to me, especially if they are challenging my own beliefs - independently revalidating one's ideas, or heaven forfend, changing them every now and then, is an essential intellectual enterprise.

10

Bless his heart, he' s been educated beyond his intelligence.....

13

Bless his heart, he' s been educated beyond his intelligence.....

– farmerbrown

Sorta like the "Peter Principle" ?

14

The only list of all time greats is my list.

Who's better and why? No point. It's who I like.


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