On the 'tube

Spencer Davis “Gimme Some Lovin”

1

Interesting for a number of reasons including: 1. Audience is so subdued. 2. Song is tad slower but still rocks. 3. Winwood's voice is torn (but still rocks). 4. On some close-ups of Winwood, he looks a lot like Conan O'Brien.

http://www.bing.com/videos/...

2

One of the truly great songs in rock history. Fantastic prominent bass line and the exposure for many for the first time to an increasing vibrato sound on an organ. And then, of course, Winwood's vocals are superb. This has always been a favorite of mine.

5

The mighty Emin7! Best chord ever!

This is one of the songs that solidified my love for the Mighty Hammond Organ---"Green Onions" was the first. By the time SDG did their first US tour, Stevie had left the band for greener pastures. The band tried reproducing the organ parts with an electric 12 string. It didn't work. He seems to have done alright for himself since then. He's not a bad guitarist, either.

6

Not to be overlooked is Muff Winwood's Harmony H22 bass. It has that great sound. Ronnie Laine used one for pretty much all of the Small Faces' career.

7

One of the truly great songs in rock history. Fantastic prominent bass line and the exposure for many for the first time to an increasing vibrato sound on an organ. And then, of course, Winwood's vocals are superb. This has always been a favorite of mine.

– Ric12string

Ric, I know it's nitpicky, but the distinctive sound is due to the Leslie speaker's rotation speed increasing.

The vibrato on a Hammond organ is controlled by a six-position knob that has three Chorus and three Vibrato settings. The slow Leslie speed is labelled "Chorale," and the fast speed is labelled "Tremolo." I know there have been posts here before about Leo Fender's reversal of the terms on his guitars and amps (the amps actually produce tremolo, a fluctuation in volume, but are labelled "Vibrato," and a guitar's whammy bar produces vibrato, a fluctuation in pitch, but they're more often called tremolo).

A Leslie speaker is a whole 'nother thang, as it produces both, and is acoustically a Doppler effect. Or as those of us who fell in love with it early on from Booker T, Steve Winwood, Felix Cavaliere, and their ilk called it, "rad and bichen'"). Once bitten by the Hammond bug, Farfisas, Vox Continentals and the like just wouldn't do.

8

Why, it's acoustically the best effect!

9

Then this is gonna make your day.

Not to mention...the guy with the hood.

10

Man, that guy's a worse presenter than I am. All the compelling excitement of an educational film at school, circa 1964. And more roundabout and repetitive than your average prog epic.

How did you find Mr Hammond Science, anyway?

Kept waiting for him to run the stick into one of the rotors.

Now he wasn't really highly technical, was he - but it was good to see the guts of the 122. And the 20 seconds of mighty B in the intro was bracing.

Fisher's hood was pretty funny, and it was interesting to see how busy Robin Trower (I assume) was on that SG - and not to hear any of it. But it was always Matthew Fisher's showcase, wunnit? Thanks for the post. Always happy to get a little Whiter...

11

THIS will make the day of any Hammond fans --- or appreciators of fine guitaring as well.

Chester Thompson, Barry Finnerty on guitar, Howard Wiley on sax and Ron E. Beck on drums. Don't need no bass with feets like CT's!

12

Yeah, baby. Because sometimes ONE Leslie just ain't enough!

13

Well, Leslies are only 40 watts unless you get one of the modern ones. They were built with output connectors so you could daisy chain them.

Notice that the rotors spin in opposite directions. I cringe when I see a sound guy jam one mike up my the HF horn. You need 3 stereo pairs, HF and LF, another pair at a distance, all in a room to itself to mike a Leslie properly.

14

You need 3 stereo pairs, HF and LF, another pair at a distance, all in a room to itself to mike a Leslie properly.

I learned that the hard way, stereo close-mic'ing a small rotating speaker in the studio.

'bout got seasick on the playback.

15

Parabar, I am not familiar with Chester Thompson, but I do love his playing in that clip you shared. Really great stuff.

16

Chester "CT" Thompson was the original keyboardist with Tower of Power from their third album onward for ten years or so, and co-wrote several of their hits. In 1983, he took over the keyboard chair with Santana, and was Santana's keyboardist for 25 years. After that he decided he had had enough of touring, and since then has fronted his own jazz group based in the SF Bay Area. The man is one of my all-time favorite organists, along with Jimmy Smith, Khalid Yasin (Larry Young), Steve Winwood, Booker T. Jones, Gregg Rolie, Tom Coster, Joey DeFrancesco, Bill Champlin and Geoff Palmer.

18

I will always remember to use only Hammond Organ Oil (3-5 drops only!).

Very fun thread. Thanks everyone for posting.

19

To name just a few, of course.

– Ric12string

There are lots more worth listening to, but those are the ones that consistently knock me out.

20

There are lots more worth listening to, but those are the ones that consistently knock me out.

– Parabar

If I were forced to compile a list, I would turn to you as my first resource.


Register Sign in to join the conversation