On the 'tube

Peter Green, Need You’re Love So Bad, just great.

1

Peter Green is hands down the best blues guitar player Britain ever produced. I don't need to explain, just listen and you'll agree. He kicks in at 3:14 and it's sublime playing as far as I'm concerned.

2

I much prefer Peter Green's playing and sound over Clapton's noodling. It's just classy and tasteful. He knows when to play. And when not.

Btw, that pictured compilation is great.

3

Amen brothers! Big fan of pre-Bob Welch Fleetwood Mac, back when it was a blues band. I almost destroyed a post-PAF signature Gibson humbucker trying to emulate Peter Green's out of phase '59 Les Paul sound.

4

Peter Green era Fleetwood Mac is the best version of that band IMO - hands down. LOVE his versions of "Black Magic Woman" and "Green Manalishi" (both of which are the original versions of the these songs - the Green 'Un wrote them). My favorite? - "Oh Well" Parts 1 & 2 (I have to agree with what Mick Fleetwood said - Parts 3 & 4 are too meandering, and end up sounding like maudlin sounding middle eastern music).

It's too bad that Peter and Danny Kirwan kind of lost their minds due to taking huge amounts of LSD when they were dragged off to that infamous party at a commune near Munich, when Fleetwood Mac was on tour in Germany. Thankfully Peter Green has recovered to an extent, and is back to playing some music, but he's definitely not the same. Nobody knows what happened to Danny Kirwan - the last anybody saw of him, he was homeless and living on the streets. The band was never the same after Peter Green left.

There's a great documentary about Peter Green, called Peter Green Man Of The World. If you do some searching, you can find it on YouTube, split up into multiple parts. It's also available on DVD.

5

Amen brothers! Big fan of pre-Bob Welch Fleetwood Mac, back when it was a blues band. I almost destroyed a post-PAF signature Gibson humbucker trying to emulate Peter Green's out of phase '59 Les Paul sound.

– Powdog

Speaking of Peter Green's '59 Les Paul - I wonder what it's status is nowadays. When Peter was seriously mentally messed up, he sold it to Gary Moore for peanuts. As far as I know, Gary owned it until the day he died of a massive heart attack several years ago. I wonder who has it now.

6

Yep, Peter Green's the only guitar player in that whole Brit Blues Boom that I really like. He was great.

7

Speaking of Peter Green's '59 Les Paul - I wonder what it's status is nowadays. When Peter was seriously mentally messed up, he sold it to Gary Moore for peanuts. As far as I know, Gary owned it until the day he died of a massive heart attack several years ago. I wonder who has it now.

– EllenGtrGrl

Gary didn't own the guitar since 2006 when he needed money and sold it. Part of the deal was the promise to keep it secret that the buyer broke immediately after the purchase which pi§§ed Gary off for sure. Later this 'fine gentleman' (who ran a music business IIRC) put it up for sale for about $ 2 million and it was actually sold to a private buyer. In 2014 Metallica's Kirk Hammett acquired "Greeny" and I think he still owns it.

8

Totally agree with the comments re Peter Green and the blues band iteration of Fleetwood Mac. Fantastic stuff in the early days of the band. I was never knocked out by Fleetwood Mac as a band after this era and I recall several times being gently derided by friends and acquaintances who were Fleetwood Mac fans when I declared that in my opinion they were much better when they were a blues band.

"Fleetwood Mac aren't a blues band!!" they would say with a chuckle. "No, not anymore...not anymore" I would reply.

By the way, I've had the same discussion several times about ZZ Top.

9

If your a fan of the guitar as well as the man, listen to Gary Moore's "Blues for Greeny". Not only did Gary do the leads spot on (with unusual restraint), but recorded the record using Greene's '59 LP. Killer tribute.

10

Totally agree with the comments re Peter Green and the blues band iteration of Fleetwood Mac. Fantastic stuff in the early days of the band. I was never knocked out by Fleetwood Mac as a band after this era and I recall several times being gently derided by friends and acquaintances who were Fleetwood Mac fans when I declared that in my opinion they were much better when they were a blues band.

"Fleetwood Mac aren't a blues band!!" they would say with a chuckle. "No, not anymore...not anymore" I would reply.

By the way, I've had the same discussion several times about ZZ Top.

– Wheelgrinder

Yep, once ZZ Top did the "Eliminator" album, I lost all interest in them. Give me "Nasty Dogs and Funky Kings", or "Precious and Grace" any day.

11

I see ZZ Top as more of a natural progression, wanting to try new things, etc. Fleetwood Mac on the other hand is two separate bands to me. There's the "Boston Tea Party" band and the "Rumours" band. I like both

12

If your a fan of the guitar as well as the man, listen to Gary Moore's "Blues for Greeny". Not only did Gary do the leads spot on (with unusual restraint), but recorded the record using Greene's '59 LP. Killer tribute.

– Powdog

Kirk Hammett has it now...

13

An interesting video in which Mick Fleetwood, Jeremy Spencer, and John McVie talk about Peter Green's LSD experience at Highfisch Kommune near Munich.

14

An interesting video in which Mick Fleetwood, Jeremy Spencer, and John McVie talk about Peter Green's LSD experience at Highfisch Kommune near Munich.

– Ric12string

I've seen this one - it's a part of the Peter Green Man Of The World Documentary. The whole documentary is really good. According to Mick Fleetwood, John McVie was absolutely furious when the couple he calls The German Jet Set, took Peter, and Danny to the commune party - it seemed to be an action that the couple had planned/plotted out ahead of time - not at all spontaneus. The funny thing is, that Peter Green and Danny Kirwan seemed to be reasonably sound of mind after the incident occurred, for a period of time (during that time period, Peter wrote and performed that last song he did, when he was in Fleetwood Mac - "The Green Manalishi (With The Two Pringed Crown), which is a fantastic song, it blows away the cover version that Judas Priest did several years later IMO [and I like Judas Priest]), but then both of them seemed to deteriorate rapidly mental state wise.

15

I surmise that this is the couple at the Highfisch Kommune that Fleetwood and McVie referred to. It is Uschi Obermaier and Rainer Langhans. She was a pretty celebrated woman of the time. There was a documentary about her that I saw on Netflix a year or so ago, as well, and it described that whole commune experience.

16

I was more a Bob Welch era guy, especially the 1971-72 Welch/Kirwan crossover era of Future Games and Bare Trees. Kiln House also cool. Hate to say it, here among a solid cadre of Tru-Believers, but the Green era didn't do much for me. No one's saying it wasn't great blues guitar and blues package tho. What about the Mac in Chicago LP. What say you?

What a vid. It appears that par-tay also was where Kirwan may have started to have issues. By the end of 1972 he was out of the band. Green, Spencer, Kirwan -- really the first 3 guitar lineup before all the 70s southern rock scene. Well, there was Moby Grape, the year before. There's some story about a party/crazy hippie freakout scene that messed w/ Skip Spence pretty badly

17

Along with Moby Grape, there was also Buffalo Springfield in 1966 with a three-guitar lineup (Stills, Young, and Richie Furay). The two bands even lived near each other in LA for a while and hung out some.

Peter was also a primary influence on Carlos Santana's tone and style --- and wrote "Black Magic Woman" too.

B.B. King famously said of Peter "He has the sweetest tone I ever heard; he was the only one who gave me the cold sweats."

'Nuff said!

18

We have had this chat a couple times now, the first few line-ups of Fleetwood Mac were great.

Guitar, cord, 100W Amp, maybe a Volume pedal.

19

Peter Green is on my Mount Rushmore of guitar players. As B.B. King said of Green "He's the only white blues guitarist who sends shivers down my back when he plays". It's a real shame that he flamed out so early from a lethal combination of mental illness and hallucinogenics. At least he is still with us at 70 but his playing was never the same.

20

I think the idea that Peter was absconded by some German socialites that fed him some drugs that lost his mind is not the issue. He had taken plenty before that and was willing to do so. The fact he lost it after that experience is for me just coincidence. He'd have gone the same way regardless because his mind was not able to continue taking heavy drugs. He did it to himself basically. I'll not lie to you guys, I've snorted, swallowed, sniffed, and smoked every drug out there bar heroin during my youth and decided at a point that I didn't like it anymore as it was having an adverse affect on my mind. If you're inner self doesn't come to that conclusion then you end up as Peter did.

21

I agree PG was a special player,sound wise alone. He got the quality out of a strat as well like on Need Your Love So Bad. Pity he didnt get to grow and develop through the years.

22

The issue with Peter Green was that he was very mentally fragile, uncomfortable with success, at times had an abnormally low opinion of his own musical talents, and had some emerging mental health issues to begin with. The use of hallucinogenics just made things much more severe. My guess is that he went of his own choice with those socialites in Germany and was a willing participant. I understand John McVie's anger toward the Germans, as it is coming from a very emotional place. Green was his close friend and he feels they stole him away, destroyed his talent and ruined his band. It's an understandably emotional reponse. McVie insists to this day that he would trade all the success that Fleetwood Mac had as a pop band to have continued on with a healthy Peter Green. I was in London last spring andwas able to visit the great old guitar shops on Denmark St. In one of the shops, Peter Green Fleetwood Mac music was constantly being played on the shops sound system. I got into a conversation with the shop owner who obviously was a Green/Mac fan but had also actually known Green back in the 60's. He was incredibly effusive in his praise of Green's talent and held him in higher esteem than even Clapton who he also had great admiration for. The thing in his opinion that separated Green from Clapton wasn't so much his guitar playing (which he thought at that level who is "better" is really subjective and a matter of taste) was that Green was a very talented songwriter who produced far more and better compositions in a short period of time before he flamed out than Clapton over an entire long career that is still going.

23

Denmark Street was somewhere I had to visit as a teenager knowing the music shops and general vibe was in Britain renowned. At the time in the 80's it was buzzing and really enjoyed it. What it's like now I don't know but I think it's not such the great place that it used to be.

24

I know Denmark St from the 80s and used to see Davy Graham above Andys Guitar Shop in The Forge. Getting off topic though. A friend and roadie used to jam w PG back then and sais sometimes he,s not there and sometimes amazing. End Of The Game was a brave improvised record.

25

Huge Peter Green fan here. That LP The Original Fleetwood Mac has been a listening staple for me for more years than I can count. And don't get me started on "Oh Well".

Simply the best.


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