On the 'tube

Nora Jones cute as a bug (and very Texas) and Gretsch solos…

1

Really dig this song...

2

Norah Jones is a treasure. I really enjoyed this performance.

It looks like the Gretsch player has T'Armonds in a Filter mount.

3

I love Norah! She, of corse, wants me...but I’m playing hard to get.

4

Nice-looking Guild Starfire that she is using in the third tune, too.

I've long enjoyed her singing & keyboard playing.

Years ago I recall hearing one of the funniest lines I've ever heard uttered by Jimmy Fallon:

"Norah Jones turned 25 years old today . . . her fans turned 50".

5

Heard the name, but never heard the music. Thoroughly enjoyable! Thanks!

6

Norah Jones is a treasure. I really enjoyed this performance.

It looks like the Gretsch player has T'Armonds in a Filter mount.

– BuddyHollywood

Guitar player is Smokey Hormel. Looks more like a 50's Streamliner with stock neck Dyna, added bridge Dyna, and Bigsby.

7

I really dug her work in the Little Willies with Jim Campilongo.

8

Guitar player is Smokey Hormel. Looks more like a 50's Streamliner with stock neck Dyna, added bridge Dyna, and Bigsby.

– Charlie Vegas

His streamliner looks exactly like my 56’

9

For those of you who remember my tearing out of the Saturday night Nashville Roundup fun to catch a plane to L.A., here is Nora's part of why. She's really "Something," isn't she (Of course, you know that Ravi Shankar is her father, and George's great friend)[Bob, you're right; she wants you. But, I didn't want to intrude on your privacy by giving her your number]{And, yes, it was a delicious concert -- can't name my favorite, but Ann Wilson, and Brian Wilson with Al have to be right near the top}:

10

Has she always been rootsy like this, or is this a new thing? The extent of my Norah Jones knowledge is that she's Ravi Shankar's daughter, she's cute, and she's won a lot of awards. My vague conception was more of a torch singer, but that was based on nothing more than maybe a late night TV appearance or two.

11

There have always been country/roots elements, but her early work was more piano-based and less overtly country. Still very comfortable to listen to. Jazz, but not frantic or trying to prove anything.

She was and remains very much her own thing, a breath of fresh air, deceptively simple in tone and approach - heartfelt, yet meticulous. Jewel-like songs (not like Jewel-the-singer...or maybe there's some similarity...but like jewels), every facet seemingly effortlessly polished. The arrangements fit together like haiku, and every member of the band is a full partner. Always sounds like it's live in the room with consummate players interacting, always serving the song, and no showing off.

Pure music played purely musically. Complete integrity and authenticity, never the hint of a pose.

And she's a consummate pianist in her style and approach. From the evidence of this clip, she's clearly less comfortable on guitar, though she takes great care and acquits herself musically. On piano it's a different story: she's effortless, and much more accomplished.

This material is OK for what it is - but I prefer her on piano and in a "torchier" context.

Younger or older, I've never thought of NJ as anything but a completely mature musical personality. From the first note of the first album, it's been obvious she's the fully formed real deal. The Ravi Shankar paternity is interesting, and one can glibly surmise she got good musical genes from him, but it's wholly irrelevant to her path and her accomplishment. When you're immersed in the incredible grace of her (and her band's) performances on record, "cute" doesn't even enter into the lexicon.

Unless you just can't stand anything that isn't clearly and self-consciously rootsy-country, I can't think you wouldn't fall into her early work - where all the influences and genres are seamlessly subsumed in something you can only call "music."

12

My old friend Smokey Hormel on the Gretsch...can't see the amp but he usually plays through my old hot-rodded Fender Concert.

13

And she's a consummate pianist in her style and approach. She's clearly new to the guitar in this clip, though she acquits herself carefully and musically. On piano she's effortless, and much more accomplished.

This material is OK for what it is - but I prefer her on piano and in a "torchier" context. -- Proteus

I agree completely. I am glad that you said this because I was afraid that I was being chauvinistic and perhaps subconsciously thinking that "guys" should be playing guitar and "girls" should stick to the piano. But, she is so darn good on the piano, plays it effortlessly, and has such a well-defined style and approach to her playing that it seems like such a waste of her tremendous talent to be playing the guitar.

14

Yeah, I fully support the notion that she (or any artist) should be free to go where their instincts lead them. There's been a clear country(ish) strain in her work from the beginning, and it's completely genuine. She's done all-country(ish) projects as well - and no doubt she's just plain enjoying playing guitar. Learning something new, focusing her melodic sense through a different voice...that's all fine. Go Norah go.

Unfortunately, though, for those who don't know her catalog, her relative inexperience on guitar - when she's fronting a band - might create the extremely inaccurate image of a "good-lookin' girl out front with a nice voice, and hey she's doin' OK on guitar." Which, in NJ's case, diminishes and patronizes her.

I was a bit taken aback to see "cute" used as a descriptor for Norah Jones. She's 39, with two children, multiple Grammies and #1 albums, has the unstinting respect of her peers, and has executed a near-flawless and very successful 15-year career while maintaining a very private life and displaying nothing but class and elegance publicly - and all of that based on the consummate musical accomplishment she displayed from the beginning. Yes, one can't help but note that she's beautiful - but I didn't know that when I first heard the masterful stillness and control of her voice, her playing, her arrangements, her recordings. It has no bearing on what she's really about.

Can't help but feel that "cute" kinda demeans it!

16

Been a fan since day one. She defines the word class. I love that she's into new sounds and is always seeking to expand her horizons.

17

Definitely a fan of Norah Jones. Jeff H, thanks for posting the "Billy Joe and Norah" track. What a treat that is! I just recently discovered that effort and was going to post something on it as well. Great stuff!

18

Foreverly is a stellar record with a pervasive creepiness about it. Each song is superbly performed. What an unexpected pairing of artists, but it works so well.

19

"This material is OK for what it is - but I prefer her on piano and in a "torchier" context."

I agree. I enjoy this. I really like The Little Willies. I LOVE her first 2 albums.

And I have had a crush on her from the first note I ever heard her sing. :)

I read an interview where she said the whole "torch" thing was not her/their idea- it was the record company's. The submitted a demo that was more countrified, and put "Don't Know Why" on there almost on a whim. The label said we'll sign you right now- but we want an entire album of "Don't Know Why". We don't want the rootsy thing, we want the jazz thing.

And that is....the rest.....of.....the story.......

20

Apart from the Little Willies records that I love, she also did some great cover versions at one off events. I really like her rendering of ‘Home of the Blues’ at the Johnny Cash Tribute and her version of OCMS’s ‘We’re All in This Thing Together’ from the Tsunami Relief charity event.

21

something different...

22

There are maybe a handful of times when an unknown artist moves you so much that it makes you run out and immediately buy their album the next day. Ten years after this, Duane had the opportunity to be on a show with Norah. She is not only a soulful genius, she is beautiful and charming and funny.

23

Her last album had a phenomenal cover of a classic but lesser known Neil Young tune. Also had an amusing lyric change for the alert listener.

Here’s a live version:

Also, always check the liner notes. Bill Frisell, Brian Blade and many other phenomenal players will be found there.

24

Proteus,

Fair point...

But...

She still cute as a bug!

(K, ducking and running)

25

Yeah, I fully support the notion that she (or any artist) should be free to go where their instincts lead them. There's been a clear country(ish) strain in her work from the beginning, and it's completely genuine. She's done all-country(ish) projects as well - and no doubt she's just plain enjoying playing guitar. Learning something new, focusing her melodic sense through a different voice...that's all fine. Go Norah go.

Unfortunately, though, for those who don't know her catalog, her relative inexperience on guitar - when she's fronting a band - might create the extremely inaccurate image of a "good-lookin' girl out front with a nice voice, and hey she's doin' OK on guitar." Which, in NJ's case, diminishes and patronizes her.

I was a bit taken aback to see "cute" used as a descriptor for Norah Jones. She's 39, with two children, multiple Grammies and #1 albums, has the unstinting respect of her peers, and has executed a near-flawless and very successful 15-year career while maintaining a very private life and displaying nothing but class and elegance publicly - and all of that based on the consummate musical accomplishment she displayed from the beginning. Yes, one can't help but note that she's beautiful - but I didn't know that when I first heard the masterful stillness and control of her voice, her playing, her arrangements, her recordings. It has no bearing on what she's really about.

Can't help but feel that "cute" kinda demeans it!

– Proteus

The Daughter of Ravi Shankar is BEAUTIFUL, not cute. I prefer her work with Jim Campilongo, The Little Willies are a delight!


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