On the 'tube

Lightfoot / Gretsch = cool

1

I don't know why people make fun of this song. Describes a real tragedy, etc. Cool chords, whining steel, etc. So here's Gordon Lightfoot on his trademark Gibson B-45 12 and his seated guitarist w/ some kinda Baldwin era model... a Gent?

2

The song is epic. Was just talking about the guitar sound the other day when recording.

3

That would be Red Shea on guitar. And I love Gord! IMO he's right up there with Dylan, Lennon-McCartney as one of the greatest songwriters of all time.

4

Curiously, there seems to be only a single pedal attached.. wonder what he used, whoever he may have been. (edit- I see the question of who the guitarist was has been answered)

It's long been a tossup for me between this and the Railroad Trilogy which is Gord's most epic work.

5

There was his guy Pee Wee Charles, on steel and he had this haunted sound that I loved.

6

I highly recommend a 2 cd set of Gord's first 4 albums called "The United Artist Collection". It's a treat for those who only know his post 1970 work.

7

I thought the song was called The Rectum of Ella Fitzgerald.

8

Curiously, there seems to be only a single pedal attached.. wonder what he used, whoever he may have been. (edit- I see the question of who the guitarist was has been answered)

It's long been a tossup for me between this and the Railroad Trilogy which is Gord's most epic work.

– Kevin Frye

I'd vote for the latter. "Wreck" is a great tune, But "Railroad Trilogy" is more musically interesting and not as repetitive. It's also substantially less depressing lyrically.

I have listened to pre-Summertime Dream Lightfoot considerably more than post-Summertime Dream Lightfoot, and I find his early United Artists records way more engaging. In fact, the "United Artists Collection" (which collects his first four albums into one 2-CD set) stays in permanent rotation for me.

9

I highly recommend a 2 cd set of Gord's first 4 albums called "The United Artist Collection". It's a treat for those who only know his post 1970 work.

– Twom

Hidden gems in this collection for me include "Wherefor & Why", the alternate trippy version of "The Way I Feel", "I'll be Alright", and "The Circle is Small". "Canadian Railway Trilogy" and all of the other early hits are here too.

10

Gord's Gold song are at the top of my all time favorite music!

The last time we saw him live (5 ?? years ago) his side man played a double cut Country Gent (same as in the video).

11

Hidden gems in this collection for me include "Wherefor & Why", the alternate trippy version of "The Way I Feel", "I'll be Alright", and "The Circle is Small". "Canadian Railway Trilogy" and all of the other early hits are here too.

– vibrotwang

Tons of hidden gems in that collection.

One of my all time Gordon faves-- just his voice and an upright bass...

And another, from the same album.

And, this one. Glen Campbell did a great cover of this, but Gord's version is hard to top.

12

The original 60s version of "The Circle is Small" is superior to the later mid 70s version.

13

The original 60s version of "The Circle is Small" is superior to the later mid 70s version.

– Twom

Agreed.

14

I’m not supposed to care Is my favorite and is special to me as it takes me back to a special girl that went far away to college, while I went into the Army.

15

That would be Red Shea on guitar. And I love Gord! IMO he's right up there with Dylan, Lennon-McCartney as one of the greatest songwriters of all time.

– Twom

Think at this point it’s a young Terry Clements on guitar. He joined the band after Red Shea left around 1971. Both lived in the Aurora/Newmarket area of Southern Ontario Canada. Took a few lessons from Red as a teenager and was thrilled to be in the studio with Terry Clements as a youngster. Both great players.


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