On the 'tube

How is this NOT copyright infringement?

26

OK, so it's a sample and not a copyright rip-off.

It's still TAKEN from someone else's work. The lyrics are original, the "music" is computer generated and devoid of musicianship. On top of it all, it's sleazy and cheesy. It's typical of the so-called "music" coming out of the hit machine that the recording industry has become. It's representative of the materialistic nonsense that has become all too pervasive. It's a sad view of what much of the world has become.

27

I don't imagine it would be hard at all to go back to the 20s, and probably much earlier, and find examples from the "I like sparkly expensive things" genre in pop music.

And one could probably find examples from each period where people decried either "these kids today" or "we've all gone materialistic"

– Baxter

I agree 100%

28

I would play in her live band if she asked me to.

29

The problem for me with modern pop is there is no there,there, as someone once said. It's like modern fast food, how is it even considered food, unless one has never experienced actual prepared food. It too often uses a sledge hammer when a 10 oz hammer is called for. Rick Beato in a video stated that exposure to complex chords is necessary to acquiring the ability to get much music, much I suppose as in exposing oneself to many cuisines is necessary to appreciate anything other than meat and potato fare. That said, the above example at least has a melody, even if it's not original. Funny though, when the guy who pulls next to you at the stop light with the stereo full blast and all you can hear/feel is the bass/drum drone, it sounds like any other modern pop tune.

30

Well I get it. I mean, Heck, Elvis didn't write his own music but the music that was written was usually written for him to perform and I know that a lot of musicians used to share songs with each other or multiple artists would do the same song and some did better on the charts than others on the same song. I'm sure it was all worked out among the artists and writers and composers and if this were the case still today, I guess I'd be more acclimated to it but they did the same song not a bastardized version of it, tag my name on it, and call it mine. It upset me the first time I heard it with rapp. It still does. To me, she really massacred what this song originally was. As reported in the article, at first, the composers were reluctant.

I guess I should just get over it, since it ends up being one of the top three songs on the charts but that even bothers me more.

It's like this band competition our band was involved in recently. A competition designed to find local original bands to open for national acts coming through town at a specific venue. Held on three seperate Thursday nights at a local bar. Our band was slotted for night # 2. I attended the first night to see how it would all flow and get an idea what the competition would be. The first band was three guys and they played some originals and some covers ad looked a sounded like they were "Chevelle". The second band came out for their sound check and the young man comes out with the new "Greta Van Fleet" scream and they go into that mode for their entire performance trying to emulate that band, IMO. Then the next artist was a guitarist and drummer and sure enough, they were set out to sound like the "Black Keys" or "Royal Blood." I thought to myself, Man we've got this in the bag just on originality. Don't get me wrong, they all did really well at what they did and were very talented. Long story short...the organizer of the event sent us an email, two days after our performance, stating that they were going a different route, this time, and look forward to working with us in the future. We were confused because there was still one week left of the competition. What about the last seven bands? Will they have a chance at all? Here we are NOW weeks later seeing that the "Greta Van Fleet" sound alikes won the competition, and in our opinion, congratulations but still, what about the guys that didn't get a fair shake? We were more concerned about how fair this could be rather than winning, at this point. We realize it will never do us any good to bring it up with anyone involved and they were likely just blowing us off when they gave us their explanation, is the feeling that we were left with. Man, what a rant. Sorry for the long post.

I guess my point is does it ever do us any good to keep trying to be original? It really doesn't hurt my feelings that we wont get to open for a national cover band that has a name that starts with HAIR but it would have been nice to feel like we were appreciated for our originality. I may be wrong. We may still get a call back, though out of the 17 bands competing, 5 already have and we likely wont. Despite that, our local entertainment magazine gave us a nice two or three lines in their write up about the night we performed. So we did get a nice "mention" in the local scene and we were happy about that.

I'm 55. I'll never get national notoriety at my age. So maybe I should just hang it all up and play acoustic in my living room for the Grandkids. If this all came out sounding like I'm whining, then I failed at my point. I've got a day job so I'm doing alright, as Mark Knopfler says.

No worries. TDC CD release party, coming soon.

32

Keep doing what YOU do, Dave. No one else can do it. If others gotta mine the memes for a routine to mime - either they got nothin’, or they’re willing to abandon themselves to get attention for what they’re not. Then there’s no them there - just a shadow of someone else.

Got something original to do? Just keep doing it. No one else can be you. If you don’t do you, you’ll disappear. You’ll wake up and see someone else in the mirror - or no reflection at all. The first (and last) recognition that matters is you knowing and respecting yourself.

And it sounds to me like this particular contest was rigged from the beginning.

33

I made it all the way to 34 seconds.

Yeah, again, I apologize. I was trying to expand my musical knowledge. Heck, try listening to all three if you want a genuine head ache.

Tim, You know me. I ain't changing for nobody. It's just a bit frustrating at times. Someday I will disappear but now I will have left two CD projects out there in the real world, so there's that.

34

I can guarantee that My Favorite Things was licensed for a substantial sum. Here's a look into the world of two of the greatest American writers of all time. No longer with is, they’re busier than ever! Holy. Moly.

And THEN they wrote...Rogers and Hammerstein

35

I'm guessing that their copyrights passed down to their heirs, if that's possible but yes, that's an eye opener. I'm sure That the royalties are all being passed down in the most legal way, now that I've read that article. Now who do I contact so I can bastardize Chitty-Chitty Bang-Bang?

36

Weird Al's made a career out of this.

37

That's a good point, Wabash. I truly hadn't considered that but as an artist I would personally be honored to be lampooned (Especially by someone that talented)rather than had my song turned into something....I don't know....I can't really define it. Does that make me biased? Really trying to be open minded here. Again, that's why I try and listen to what's relevant in today's music and keep up with the kids. Maybe that's my first mistake.

38

It's a good thing to expand your musical knowledge and get out of your comfort zone.

That's how I found gems like Maximum The Hormone and guilty pleasures like Die Antwoord.

39

That's a good point, Wabash. I truly hadn't considered that but as an artist I would personally be honored to be lampooned (Especially by someone that talented)rather than had my song turned into something....I don't know....I can't really define it. Does that make me biased? Really trying to be open minded here. Again, that's why I try and listen to what's relevant in today's music and keep up with the kids. Maybe that's my first mistake.

– Suprdave

I recently saw Weird Al being interviewed by Dan Rather, and he made a point that he always gets permission from artists that he parodies. He said most are honored and gracious, and one even said he knew he had "made it" when Weird Al contacted him wanting to parody his song.

Al said very few artists refused, one being Prince.

40

I don't imagine it would be hard at all to go back to the 20s, and probably much earlier, and find examples from the "I like sparkly expensive things" genre in pop music.

And one could probably find examples from each period where people decried either "these kids today" or "we've all gone materialistic"

– Baxter

You will always be able to find examples. But examples alone are not a measure of the social or cultural relevance of any phenomena at any given time.

There are still examples of the bubonic plague that can be found today. Though no one would consider it an indication that it is still as relevant as it was in the Middle Ages when it wiped out one third of Europe’s population

41

That's a good point, Wabash. I truly hadn't considered that but as an artist I would personally be honored to be lampooned (Especially by someone that talented)rather than had my song turned into something....I don't know....I can't really define it. Does that make me biased? Really trying to be open minded here. Again, that's why I try and listen to what's relevant in today's music and keep up with the kids. Maybe that's my first mistake.

– Suprdave

I never tried to keep up with the kids. They had to try to keep up with me.

That seems to be the situation here. It's not about us copying them, but instead, they're copying the older guys.

42

You will always be able to find examples. But examples alone are not a measure of the social or cultural relevance of any phenomena at any given time.

There are still examples of the bubonic plague that can be found today. Though no one would consider it an indication that it is still as relevant as it was in the Middle Ages when it wiped out one third of Europe’s population

– eCastro

we're not even through March yet, but i'm still confident that this is the Best Simile of 2019. congratulations!!!

43

I don't imagine it would be hard at all to go back to the 20s, and probably much earlier, and find examples from the "I like sparkly expensive things" genre in pop music.

And one could probably find examples from each period where people decried either "these kids today" or "we've all gone materialistic"

– Baxter

There's nothing new under the sun.

NSFW:

44

I'm guessing that their copyrights passed down to their heirs, if that's possible but yes, that's an eye opener. I'm sure That the royalties are all being passed down in the most legal way, now that I've read that article. Now who do I contact so I can bastardize Chitty-Chitty Bang-Bang?

– Suprdave

Copyrights are renewable and are able to be passed to heirs or assignees. Now your idea regarding the use of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, you will need to contact the publishers for the amazing Sherman Brothers.

You all know their songs, and their catalogue is mind blowing! The Sherman Brothers

Bonus points: Name the author of the book Chitty Chitty Bang Bang

45

Copyrights are renewable and are able to be passed to heirs or assignees. Now your idea regarding the use of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, you will need to contact the publishers for the amazing Sherman Brothers.

You all know their songs, and their catalogue is mind blowing! The Sherman Brothers

Bonus points: Name the author of the book Chitty Chitty Bang Bang

– Deed Eddy

Fleming, Ian Fleming.

That said, much of the script for the movie was the product of Roald Dahl.. and this next two months, I will be seriously immersed in his other creation, though the music is Bricusse/Newley..

46

Well I get it. I mean, Heck, Elvis didn't write his own music but the music that was written was usually written for him to perform and I know that a lot of musicians used to share songs with each other or multiple artists would do the same song and some did better on the charts than others on the same song. I'm sure it was all worked out among the artists and writers and composers and if this were the case still today, I guess I'd be more acclimated to it but they did the same song not a bastardized version of it, tag my name on it, and call it mine. It upset me the first time I heard it with rapp. It still does. To me, she really massacred what this song originally was. As reported in the article, at first, the composers were reluctant.

I guess I should just get over it, since it ends up being one of the top three songs on the charts but that even bothers me more.

It's like this band competition our band was involved in recently. A competition designed to find local original bands to open for national acts coming through town at a specific venue. Held on three seperate Thursday nights at a local bar. Our band was slotted for night # 2. I attended the first night to see how it would all flow and get an idea what the competition would be. The first band was three guys and they played some originals and some covers ad looked a sounded like they were "Chevelle". The second band came out for their sound check and the young man comes out with the new "Greta Van Fleet" scream and they go into that mode for their entire performance trying to emulate that band, IMO. Then the next artist was a guitarist and drummer and sure enough, they were set out to sound like the "Black Keys" or "Royal Blood." I thought to myself, Man we've got this in the bag just on originality. Don't get me wrong, they all did really well at what they did and were very talented. Long story short...the organizer of the event sent us an email, two days after our performance, stating that they were going a different route, this time, and look forward to working with us in the future. We were confused because there was still one week left of the competition. What about the last seven bands? Will they have a chance at all? Here we are NOW weeks later seeing that the "Greta Van Fleet" sound alikes won the competition, and in our opinion, congratulations but still, what about the guys that didn't get a fair shake? We were more concerned about how fair this could be rather than winning, at this point. We realize it will never do us any good to bring it up with anyone involved and they were likely just blowing us off when they gave us their explanation, is the feeling that we were left with. Man, what a rant. Sorry for the long post.

I guess my point is does it ever do us any good to keep trying to be original? It really doesn't hurt my feelings that we wont get to open for a national cover band that has a name that starts with HAIR but it would have been nice to feel like we were appreciated for our originality. I may be wrong. We may still get a call back, though out of the 17 bands competing, 5 already have and we likely wont. Despite that, our local entertainment magazine gave us a nice two or three lines in their write up about the night we performed. So we did get a nice "mention" in the local scene and we were happy about that.

I'm 55. I'll never get national notoriety at my age. So maybe I should just hang it all up and play acoustic in my living room for the Grandkids. If this all came out sounding like I'm whining, then I failed at my point. I've got a day job so I'm doing alright, as Mark Knopfler says.

No worries. TDC CD release party, coming soon.

– Suprdave

I find it ironic that you are an original band wanting to open for a cover band. It should be the other way around.

Trying to think like a promoter, I'm guessing they chose the Greta Van Fleetwood MacDonalds band because they would best compliment the music that Hairball plays in their sets.

47

It's not infringement if you pay them for it.

48

Sometimes, people get busted and have to fess up:

49

At what point does sampling become copying? I can think of a couple of tunes that copy Zevon's "Werewolves of London" intro lick note for note. With a I-IV-V progression so prevalent in most pop music, there'll be some copying going on. There are only 13 notes in an octave. At some point there's going to be some repetition. Rowan Atkinson joked that Andrew Lloyd Weber has made a career of copying Puccini.

Everything is built on what went before. I really don't have a definitive answer. I doubt anyone does. It is a problem that won't go away.

50

Most every blues song you’re ever heard could probably be traced back to Willie Dixon or Howlin Wolf or Robert Johnson or Muddy Waters so there’s that.

I mean Stevie Ray Vaughn is Albert King licks on amphetamines so...


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