On the 'tube

Herman’s Hermits and Gretsch

1

One of my favorite bands and like many British Invasion bands they played Gretsch -

2

There was a good reason for that.

Jimmie Webster did deals and played demos all over the U.K. in 1964 so the result was that Gretsch guitars were really the only quality U.S. guitars available until later in the 60's.

3

I went to Jimmie Webster's Gretsch promo in Liverpool in 1964. I went with our drummer who agreed to come along because I'd gone with him to a Joe Morello drum promo for Ludwig.

4

I went to Jimmie Webster's Gretsch promo in Liverpool in 1964. I went with our drummer who agreed to come along because I'd gone with him to a Joe Morello drum promo for Ludwig.

– Dave_K

Hard to say who got the better end of that deal! Morello is right at the top of the list of drummers I really admire and I worked out many many Hermans Hermits songs on guitar in the formative days. I remember how delighted I was in 1999 driving into Las Vegas and seeing that Peter Noone was playing that night at some casino. (My only mistake was not going to Bo Diddley who was also playing there then.)

I came upon this interview with Peter Noone not to long ago which I thought was pretty good. I never knew about the John Paul Jones connection to the band.

5

I thought I was the only Herman's Hermits fan left! It's cool seeing Lek sporting a Tennessean!

6

Knavel,

It was Sunset Station outdoor arena....... I lived near there at the time.

7

Dave K....then I'm sure you'll still remember the stereo White Falcon with all of the switches and the matching Gretsch amps, one for each channel.

8

In 1969 an English friend in elementary school taught me dirty lyrics to "Sunshine Girl." It wasn't until decades later that I learned it was a real song.

9

Knavel,

It was Sunset Station outdoor arena....... I lived near there at the time.

– Yavapai

Cool.

One thing that I found amusing was that Mrs Brown is the most obvious song (and maybe the only one) that proves the value of the 60s Gretsch muting system. And in a live situation, what is used instead......

10

Peter Noone seems to come from a background of classic workingman's club entertainment. Nothing trying to be pretentious or "prog"; rather, just sing a nice song that entertains the public. The songs were obviously chosen, in large part, for their melodic content. But, also, I would think, for their positive attitude.

I had the pleasure of meeting Peter Noone and hanging with him for about forty minutes before he performed one year at Abbey Road On The River. A more likable person would be hard to find. He has a very quick wit and one quickly sees that he is accustomed, after all these many years, to being entertaining. Stories, quips, and funny remarks are all a part of who he is. In this video that was posted above, he was pretty mellow. But, I saw him early in the afternoon at AROTR in a panel discussion with people like Laurence Juber, Peter Asher, and the like, and he was always "on." Super quick, excellent memory, and just quite funny. My perception of him is that he is likely quite intelligent to be able to handle that kind of snappy repartee.

11

Knavel: The Lovin' Spoonful's "Nashville Cats" also made use of a Country Gentleman with the mutes


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