On the 'tube

Gatemouth Brown & Roy Clark Takin’ The ‘A’ Train

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Alas we don't seem to get this sort of musicmaking on tv these days.

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Roy on a Byrdland, it appears... he used Gretsch, but really was a Gibson guy

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And using a capo nonetheless. I couldn’t do it. Using capos and playing solos are like tying my feet together and telling me to run.

Guys I’m my group capo at odd places and tune to Eb. I carry two guitars: one tuned to standard, the other 1/2step so I don’t have to capo. Works for some folks I guess...

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Gatemouth plays so effortlessly . I'll never forget meeting him. I told him that I played guitar and that he had impressed me a lot. he said, "well, hold on, I'm gonna show you some more." and he did !!!

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Yeah! What a blast to hear a band lay it down.

Roy was working pretty hard, and demonstrated lots of chops between the spots where either his ideas or his technique gave out - but Clarence was in the groove and swinging musically throughout.

Then the long-haired bushy-bearded expressionless pedal steel jockey effortlessly showed everyone how it's done.

I thought the third guitarist off to the right (who, I wonder) acquitted himself at least as well as Roy.

But Roy is always about the FUN of it, and Clarence was surely right there with him. What a great player.

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That 3rd guitarist off to the right was Leon Rhodes. Leon gained notoriety with Ernest Tubb. I thought he took the Billy Byrd style to a very pleasant level. He’s one of my favorites. Trying to outplay Leon would be an exercise in futility.

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Thanks, Richard. I knew he had to be somebody. He just nails it.

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I know someone who was fortunate to have been friends with the late great Leon Rhodes. Amazing guitar player and first class gentleman. Rhodes was also a well respected guitar tech and had input into the design of Gibson and Epiphone Thinline electrics along with working for acoustic builders Grammer Guitars and Gower Guitars.

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Great video and talents. That bass player could almost make Bill Wyman look energetic.

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Brown's playing is hard for me to fathom. It seems effortless, and his right hand technique...I can't quite see how he sounds that clean and precise using his fingers the way he does. Amazing.

And yeah, that steel player...just wow.

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here's some more Gatemouth :

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Rhythmisking: that's exactly what I was thinking when I posted the video. Without a doubt, Roy Clark is a great player, but at least you can see what he does. But with Gatemouth -- how on earth does he do that?! In my book he's just a great one-off.

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I just love the phaser on the steel. So ludicrously unnecessary, it becomes absolutely necessary.

I saw Gatemouth Brown. He was supporting Eric Clapton on his arena tour in the early 90s. Gatemouth was sat down in dark western outfit, hat and Firebird, effortlessly ripping out blues, Western swing and jazz just looking out nonplussed all around at this giant hall which was filling up as he played.

The arena was full by the time he finished and was half empty again by the half-hour mark into Clapton's set. He played no hits- no Cream, no Dominos, no nothing. Just the blues. Thousands of Glaswegians abandoned the show in vocal, gesticulating dismay as Clapton played a pub gig in an arena, with tickets at arena prices.

It was a bizarre evening. Gatemouth was the absolute highlight.

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I just love the phaser on the steel. So ludicrously unnecessary, it becomes absolutely necessary.

I saw Gatemouth Brown. He was supporting Eric Clapton on his arena tour in the early 90s. Gatemouth was sat down in dark western outfit, hat and Firebird, effortlessly ripping out blues, Western swing and jazz just looking out nonplussed all around at this giant hall which was filling up as he played.

The arena was full by the time he finished and was half empty again by the half-hour mark into Clapton's set. He played no hits- no Cream, no Dominos, no nothing. Just the blues. Thousands of Glaswegians abandoned the show in vocal, gesticulating dismay as Clapton played a pub gig in an arena, with tickets at arena prices.

It was a bizarre evening. Gatemouth was the absolute highlight.

– ade

when I saw Gatemouth, he was in a small bar. none the less, he put on a great show.

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Without a doubt, Gatemouth didn't get the acclaim he deserved. He's also a great swing fiddle player. Search the Austin City Limits archive, I think you find many things you will like.

Lee

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I think for many people, his name got him associated with old-line blues guys - and then the western outfits just didn't compute. And when you hear him, his playing - his lines, his approach - are very "modern" (for blues). There's almost as much Allman Brothers there as Delta. Or maybe it's the swing thing. But he wasn't deep dark gutbucket blues.

He just didn't color inside any of the genre lines that might have helped position him. And that's great - it's the uniqueness of the true originals that set them apart.


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