On the 'tube

Chinese Bluegrass

1

I like it! Maybe up in a Yukon goldrush town or Californian railway camp it really happened.

2

How do you say "Yeeeee -haaaaa" in Mandarin or Cantonese?

3

That actually works pretty well. I likey!

4

That actually works pretty well. I likey!

5

Very cool. In the context of the focus and articulation of the Chinese instruments, the guitar sounds pretty insipid. The mando and the banjo hold up pretty well.

I have a thing for Chinese and Mongolian stringed instruments. Wish the girl on the left had played that sittin'-down thing in front of her. Those sound amazing.

(Not enough of a thing to learn the names of the instruments, though.)

6

They's a whole lotta plinkin' & plonkin' goin on there; the Chinese instruments fit right in. The only one I know the name of is the pipa, pronounced pee-pa. That'd be the teardrop shaped one. The one with the long neck and small round body looks like a Japanese shamisen, but there is most likely a Chinese equivalent.

I imagine this would be akin to poking at a hornets nest for a lot of bluegrass traditionalists, especially in the context of the current trad VS modern bluegrass debate, but that's probably one pot that needs to be stirred.

7

Just goes to show ya that the banjo belongs to the world. I'm thinking of that fretless banjoid type instrument. It looked like an old-timey fretless banjo to me.

8

Just goes to show ya that the banjo belongs to the world. I'm thinking of that fretless banjoid type instrument. It looked like an old-timey fretless banjo to me.

– Jim Krause

Well, the fretless banjo was one of the original instruments used in bluegrass.


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