Modern Gretsch Guitars

Streamliner center block or telecaster plus

1

Hi all Firstly, I'm an owner of a 6120BST, 6128T electric guitars and absolutely love Gretsch guitars. Now, I've been looking for a new sound to go with some stuff I've written that does not match my Neo-Rockabilly band sound, first I thought the jet would do a good job but then I'm thinking I'd love to try the telecaster so I can reach high up to the second 'A' and play on the 20th fret without breaking bones. Also would like to have that overdrive sound and whilst my guitars are awesome at what they do, I want something different. The Streamline offers this at a low price and I can buy the modern telecaster plus for a similar price. Of course, I need to and will test these back to back in a shop but thought I'd ask your opinions first. thank you Si

2

Everyone needs a Tele. I'd love Streamliner. Can you get both?

3

The new Streamliners and Electromatics are above and beyond what one would expect for a less than pro-line guitar. Heck, I'm not sure I could tell the difference, blindfolded. Welcome to the GDP.

4

What year is the Telecaster Plus? The Plus versions came with a bridge humbucker or a 3-pu configuration. Why the "Plus"? I'd rather get a 50s Classic, Baja or even Squier Classic Vibe. And as hilosean already stated: Everybody needs a Tele.

5

I've never found a problem getting to the high frets on a Jet.

I think it depends if you want the airy mid range in the tone your seeking or if you are looking for the more present mid range of a solid body. The Jet will give you the airy mids, the Streamliner will most likely be more of a hybrid and a Telecaster will smack you in the face.

I've found that on recent recordings I preferred my chambered Duo Jet and my hollow Casino as rhythm guitars and my solid HSS Strat and Gretsch Corvette with HiLotrons as lead guitars. Another great combination is a hollow or chambered guitar on one side and a solid guitar on the other side for rhythm tracks which is the recipe for AC/DCs great guitar sounds on their albums.

6

I didn't know it til I knew it, but You gotta have a tele.

7

Streamliner AND Classic Vibe.

Because (if you haven't, and if you have, ignore the rest of this) you GOTTA have a Tele. But you don't (or shouldn't) want a humbucker at the bridge until you've spent a lot of time with the classic Tele single-coil bridge pickup. Which is the heart and soul of Telecaster after all. It's so self-sufficient it's not really like any other bridge pickup (well, maybe a P-90 - but very different).

Until you've come to terms with a Tele and its bridge pickup, you're missing an important part of your electric guitar education. And the CV Tele hews mighty close to Leo's original intention: cheap, reliable, and good.

Take advantage of the incredible value in the CV, and get the Streamliner TOO. A Gretsch centerblocker is an ideal midpoint between solidbody and hollowbody, with the sustain, stability, and feedback resistance of the solid but some of the body and air of the hollow.

But I observe that you seem to be working your way in tiny increments toward hollowbodiness. The BST is slab, the 6128 is chambered, and you're considering the center-block Streamliner, which is another step. Sure you don't want to go all the way to a real thinline hollowbody, like maybe yon Electromatic 5422?

https://www.gretschguitars....

But DON'T think of combining the two notions with a thinline semi-hollow Tele. It's a great guitar, and it combines hollow and solid in ways similar to a centerblocker, but calibrated to a Tele's tonal contours. However, it's NOT a substitute for a standard-issue original-concept Telecaster, which has a purity of intention and execution translating to a voice every guitarist should be familiar with.

8

Streamliner AND Classic Vibe.

Because (if you haven't, and if you have, ignore the rest of this) you GOTTA have a Tele. But you don't (or shouldn't) want a humbucker at the bridge until you've spent a lot of time with the classic Tele single-coil bridge pickup. Which is the heart and soul of Telecaster after all. It's so self-sufficient it's not really like any other bridge pickup (well, maybe a P-90 - but very different).

Until you've come to terms with a Tele and its bridge pickup, you're missing an important part of your electric guitar education. And the CV Tele hews mighty close to Leo's original intention: cheap, reliable, and good.

Take advantage of the incredible value in the CV, and get the Streamliner TOO. A Gretsch centerblocker is an ideal midpoint between solidbody and hollowbody, with the sustain, stability, and feedback resistance of the solid but some of the body and air of the hollow.

But I observe that you seem to be working your way in tiny increments toward hollowbodiness. The BST is slab, the 6128 is chambered, and you're considering the center-block Streamliner, which is another step. Sure you don't want to go all the way to a real thinline hollowbody, like maybe yon Electromatic 5422?

https://www.gretschguitars....

But DON'T think of combining the two notions with a thinline semi-hollow Tele. It's a great guitar, and it combines hollow and solid in ways similar to a centerblocker, but calibrated to a Tele's tonal contours. However, it's NOT a substitute for a standard-issue original-concept Telecaster, which has a purity of intention and execution translating to a voice every guitarist should be familiar with.

– Proteus

His BST is a 6120...Setzer? Not a slab, I think.

9

OH! Well OK. Bad reading on my part.

Never mind then! What I said about Telecasters still holds, but he can safely ignore the hollowbody part. (Except there is a difference between a hollowbody, a THINline hollowbody, and a centerblock.)

10

I cant imagine life without a Gretsch AND a Tele

11

I cant imagine life without a Gretsch AND a Tele

12

If not the Setzer model, maybe 6120 BST = Blue Stain Tremelo?

Edit: I just checked my Country Club. The label says 6192/BS. There is not even a hint of blue in it. Therefore maybe Brown Stain although I can’t think of a brown 6120.

13

I thought the answer for BS or BST would be here but I don't see it.

14

I’ll vouch for the wonderfulness of the Squier CV Tele. It taught me that I really did need a Tele and did so at a real value.

15

A friend of mine recently acquired a 57 Reissue Tele and it felt the same as my Squier. It didn't sound the same though.

16

I'm here to tell you that everyone definitely does not need to have a Telecaster. Many, if not most, players want one, but you don't need to have one. I have one and I never play it. And it's a great one. I have never bonded with it but I hope someday that I do.

17

If not the Setzer model, maybe 6120 BST = Blue Stain Tremelo?

Edit: I just checked my Country Club. The label says 6192/BS. There is not even a hint of blue in it. Therefore maybe Brown Stain although I can’t think of a brown 6120.

– Baba Joe

I'd fire the marketing guy who wanted to name something Brown Stain.

18

I definitely don't need a Tele. I've played them enough to have a good sense of what they do, and it just isn't part of the guitar palette that I use all that often. Most of the Tele-tones that I could imagine using are available --- or close enough --- on my Peavey T-60. And since aesthetically I find Teles unappealing (a masterpiece of functional design, to be sure, but not, you know, sexy) I rarely even think about them, other than to notice who uses them for what.

Now, if someone were to GIVE me one, or if I were to stumble across a STUPID good deal on one at the same time I happened to have a little extra cash, I would certainly spend some time with it, as I've done with my Stagg Strat (which I only acquired some 50 plus years after I started playing guitar). But I won't and don't feel deprived in any way not having one.

19

I'm here to tell you that everyone definitely does not need to have a Telecaster. Many, if not most, players want one, but you don't need to have one. I have one and I never play it. And it's a great one. I have never bonded with it but I hope someday that I do.

– Ric12string

Same with me, I tried many Tele's, always with the same conclusion: does not work for me. My son does miracles with that, just not me. Same thing for Strat. However, I do love my Modern Player Marauder.

20

I'd fire the marketing guy who wanted to name something Brown Stain.

– NJBob

I’ll have to fire myself, but honestly wonder about this designation. Had my Club been identified as a 6192/ SB for sun burst instead of BS (which itself seems awkward for a couple of reasons) I would be less intrigued. Going back to the OP here, my vote is still on a blue 6120.

Haven’t found the Tele yet that does it for me. It seems like everyone should have one, but it’s not high on the bucket list yet.

21

I cannot imagine life without a Gretsch and an acoustic. And maybe some bagpipes. Get the Streamliner and some bagpipes.

22

Great thread, very enjoyable. For Me, I honestly can’t imagine life without a big Gretsch hollowbody and a good Telecaster. My newest fave is the Brad Paisley model, Comes with a big fat baseball bat neck, light as a feather, with a set of the amazingly great V Mod pickups,in silver sparkle.. I’m waiting for the prices to come down before I buy a used one,

23

I'm not saying everyone has to have a Tele - like in their stable, now and always. I don't play mine often, but I sure feel like I "need" it/them. But I can well understand someone deciding it's not their cuppa.

I'm saying every electric guitar player should spend enough time with a Tele to know what it's about, and find out if it's an important tool for them. The best way to do that is either to borrow one long-term (from someone who will practically forget you have it) - or own one. Not necessarily forever - but a Tele doesn't give up its goods overnight. And I feel like the CV is a good enough Tele to understand the beast, so it's not a big investment.

I don't really get genre-casting Teles either. Sure, they're country - in every flavor known to man from the beginning of electrified country music to the present. (Or close to the beginning. Bigsby was there a couple of years earlier.) But players as bafflingly diverse as Keith Richards, Syd Barrett, Bruce Springsteen, Joe Strummer, Jim Campilongo, Jimmy Page, and Bill Frisell have found their own profoundly different (and not-at-all Tele-clichéd) voices in the Telecaster. (And, geez, there are literally countless others, across most genres where the electric guitar has been used.)

It's a fundamentally "transparent" guitar that each player makes his own. There's no doubt the Tele bridge pup has a unique character of its own, but when balanced with the surprisingly un-colored neck pickup, the guitar becomes almost an empty slate for each player, a palette it's up to the player to find color in.

More than most guitars I can think of, the Tele demands you bring something to it - or, put more positively, helps you find and then rewards whatever unique thang you got.

24

For me, a simple '52 "Blackguard" Telecaster is essential . But so is a basic Gretsch 6120.

Of course,melt the two together and you have a Rickenbacker 330.

25

I'm here to tell you that everyone definitely does not need to have a Telecaster. Many, if not most, players want one, but you don't need to have one. I have one and I never play it. And it's a great one. I have never bonded with it but I hope someday that I do.

– Ric12string

Finally! After all the Telecaster praise hype here is the truth from Bob.

I had a Squier Affinity Tele that a friend gave me and sold it here. I stripped it, modded it and it was awesome but it had similar tones to my Duo Jet but thinner without the airy midrange. My Duo Jet sounded better in every position. If I didn't have a Duo Jet and a Stratocaster I could see me possibly wanting a Telecaster but I realize I don't need one.


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