Modern Gretsch Guitars

It’s Been a While - Last Ditch Gretsch Attempt For Me

26

The early Super Chets have a wider neck that's chunky to the point of being flat across the Bottom. Might work for you.

Mine didn't suit me so I had my luthier sand it down from a fat D profile to the lovely shallow C of my Gibson Gent. A thick neck doesn't suit me at all as I wrap my hand around to fret the low E with my thumb.

27

G6241 Deluxe Hardshell Case.

– Wade H

Sorry I forgot to respond Wade. Nice guitar! I'll think about it, though I'm kind of leaning towards another ProLine.

28

Ya know you could go and find a nice big box from the mid 30s to the early 50s and put a floating pickup on it? My old 1935 Imperator "C" would fill that nitch place as would my 1948 Cats eye Gretsch. Very round, chunky necks that are comfortable to play? Might be an option for you? AND, if you get the right one it could become more valuable as you use it?

– RCgold

That's a thought, though I would prefer to have a cutaway (sorry - it's the lead guitarist in me; though it's been nigh on to impossible for me to get in a rock band, since I moved to the Milwaukee Metro Area for my Job in 2004 [the last time I auditioned for a band was in 2016, and neither myself, or the band members were feeling it, when I played with them [It was a top 40 rock covers band, which has never been my thing]).

29

I'm thinking a used custom shop.

– hammerhands

If you know what to look for.

Custom shop guitars (be they Gretsch, Fender, etc.) cost serious money, even used, and you'd better be good at getting information out of the seller about the specs. I'm kind of shying away from Custom Shop. The closest I considered was a Fender Custom Shop Nocaster Thinline, and it turns out that they are no longer available, and the used ones that are selling cost more than I can afford without doing guitar trades (which is kind of hard to do with a private seller).

30

Hi Ellen,glad to see you in this neck of the woods ! I'm interested in this thread as I'm in the fatter/wider better camp. I have a gibson based off the 350t that has the widest neck I've played outside of classicals.Just shy 1 3/4''. It's an anomaly though. My Country Club neck doesn't bother me as much as the scale,though I play Fenders all the time with no issues, and the aforementioned 350 has a strat scale of 25.5''

31

The early Super Chets have a wider neck that's chunky to the point of being flat across the Bottom. Might work for you.

Mine didn't suit me so I had my luthier sand it down from a fat D profile to the lovely shallow C of my Gibson Gent. A thick neck doesn't suit me at all as I wrap my hand around to fret the low E with my thumb.

– Windsordave

Yeah the Super Chets are kind of cool, but I will admit that I have some concern about the durability of the pickguard mounted controls. Also, I just checked Reverb, and other than one in so-so shape from 1977, that's going far about $2055 (which makes me cringe, due to its condition), the rest are going for well over $3000 each, and the earlier ones are going for over $5000. I'm a bit hesitant to spend that much coin. I don't want to use up all of my unemployment back-pay money on a guitar. I want save a little for the unexpected rainy day.

32

I can't help you with Gretsch neck sizes. I'm not sure it's entirely predictable, even within the same model group, as specs change slightly with different variations through the models through the years. You'd have to keep a database of the specs you're concerned about for each model number, for each set of tweaks, ideally as kind of a registry with serial numbers and manufacturing dates.

You're never going to get that, because no one consistently collects data in that detail, and because even if someone tried (ask Bax, TartanPhantom, and Ed Ball), individual owners can't possibly be relied upon to measure the same points on their guitars, in the same way - especially not for neck profiles. The industry as a whole has struggled with a ways to quantify and characterize neck shapes. (Which, also, can't be measured in just one place because profiles can change along the length of the neck.)

I'm not even sure that if we said, "yeah, you want to look for model#XXXX, from this year to that year," you could be sure that an individual example you found in the wilds would be consistent with that prediction.

This isn't to say that Gretsch necks get random profiles - I'm sure there's some pattern of consistency, particularly if we consider specs falling across a kind of definable range as "close enough." And I guess it's true that Gretschs generally have kinda thinner necks than the general run of guitars.

But, to my hands, not very obviously so. I don't have the benefit (and sometimes, obviously, liability) of having developed good classical technique - or good technique of any kind - so I find I'm not terribly sensitive to neck profiles. I can certainly feel the difference when I switch from one guitar to another, but I adjust quickly, and don't even find that I can do things better on some necks than on others. String gauge makes more of a difference for me.

There are extremes I have trouble dealing with. I'm comfortable with ball-bat necks of any dimension - until they get so rotund that my teeny tiny you-call-those-man-fingers? simply can't reach their intended targets. (To quantify this, my longest left hand finger is 3.125" from the web to the tip, and my thumb 2.125" using the same coordinates.)

Like you, though, too-thin, too-flat shredder necks wreck me, and for a similar reason. It's not that my thumb gets tired standing higher off the neck to get to the strings (because my thumb is rarely planted properly on the back of the neck); it's more that the whole web of my hand aches from trying somehow to stay away from the wood that isn't there.

I've been lucky that I've only had to part with one guitar (partly) for this reason - a Charvel Surfcaster - but I'm not attracted to shallow, flat shredder-neck guitars in the first place.

Within the wide range of neck depths and profiles I'm comfortable with, I'm much more sensitive to string spacing at the nut - and radius - than to neck shape. I seem to be OK with radii from 9" to 14" or so - and can tolerate a radius steeper than 9" much better than anything flatter than 14". And too-skinny nut-width, forget it. I've offed more guitars for that deficiency than any other.


All that said, maybe I can help a little. I have both an Electro 5420 and a Streamliner 2420, and it's always been my subjective impression that the Streamliner feels chunkier and more substantial. I just dragged them out and put a micrometer on them.

(Part of the reason you'll have trouble getting reliably comparable measurements from owners is that to do a truly accurate job, you have to get strings completely off the neck so you aren't measuring string diameters - and dealing with the variable of "how hard did the guy press the strings down with the jaw of the micrometer?" - not to mention controlling for exactly where along the length of the neck your volunteer layman scientist is taking his reading. Few people are going to take the strings off their neck and take obsessively-controlled measurements to help someone else solve a problem they aren't having. Now, I like you, so I did get the guitars out of their cases for in-hand comparison, and find a protocol that may be useful. I didn't take the strings off the neck, though.)

So here's how I measured: right AT the first fret, I clamped the micrometer on the neck just hard enough to press the strings down to the fret. (So, yeah, you're getting string diameters in my readings - but the comparisons should still hold.) Then I did the same thing at the 9th fret (because at the 12th fret there's too much slippery-slope heel to provide an anchor). These measurements, then, give you the front to back thickness of the neck as your hand would feel it at those locations when fretting.

The meatball measurements bear out my impression (with my "old" Country Club included as a representative of the pro line):

Electromatic 5420
First fret: .932" / 7th Fret: 1.01"

Streamliner 2420
First fret: 1.13" / 7th Fret: 1.45"

2004 Country Club 6196
First fret: .907" / 7th Fret: 1.44"

(Bearing in mind that these are all ish readings, and the presence of digits to the thousandth erroneously implies more precision than actually achieved. Also note that the Electromatic and Streamliner are both strung with 11s, the Country Club with 12s - which matters because, remember, I'm measuring through the strings.)

Still, clearly a difference.

I know you said you're inclined to the pro series - but let me say that I've found the Streamliner an astonishingly good guitar, and not just for the money (which is all I was expecting). I'm delighted it far more than exceeds expectations.

Besides the clearly beefier neck, the neck profile is also noticeably rounder than the Electromatic's. It simply feels like more neck in the hand. Picking up the Electromatic after playing the Streamliner, it's like "wow, now this is a dainty little thing, ainit?" (A sensation which fades quickly, at least for me, as I adjust.)

The Streamliner is also appreciably deeper in body: 2.75" (measured right beside the Bigsby bracket at the butt) vs 2.56" for the Electro. It also feels more open and resonant to me - because it's wide open, lacking the Electro's soundpost. While the Electromatic is refined and composed, very well-mannered, the Streamliner feels more responsive and alive. It actually feels like it's built lighter, more resonant, than the Country Club. (In fact, depending on how loud you're playing, it might want some additional damping - but it's way easier to add this than try to take it away from a too-stiff guitar.)

Now, I wish the Electromatic and Streamliner series had 17" guitars (other than the Tim Armstrong), but until they do, the 2420 kinda serves as the affordable series' big-box model.

Construction, build, fit, finish are all excellent on mine. It's a little simpler, a little plainer than the pro-line - and I'm not judging the materials - but it doesn't feel like a down-market, cheaper guitar. Still, in bone-stock form, I wouldn't call it a replacement for a pro-line.

Issue number one: the pickups just aren't very characterful or distinguished - at least to my ears. They may be better than the generi-buckers in other archtops in something like its class (Ibanez Artcores, for instance) - but they don't make magic Gretsch noises for me. BUT they're in the industry-standard humbucker form factor, so can be replaced by anything. I think I recall you liked Dynasonics; TV makes T-Armonds in humbucker mount, as well as the humbucking-but-Dyna-like Magnatron - and you can get traditional Gretsch surrounds to bring the appearance up a notch. I'm putting Mel Waldorf's amazing Off-Kilter'Trons in mine to cover ever conceivable tone.

Next up for attention would be the nut; if I was tricking out a Streamliner as my main ride, I'd just have a pro-line quality bone-or-otherwise nut installed, with pro dressing. Until that was done, I wouldn't know if the tuners are up to professional snuff. And I might want to replace the tuners with something traditionally Gretschy anyway: Sta-Tites, Imperials.

Strangely enough, I have a Tru-Arc bridge on mine, which seems an improvement over the stock Adjustamatic. I'd also put a Reverend soft spring in the stock Bigsby.

And at that point, we're down to cosmetic niceties. I've come to really like the plastic dome knobs (which remind me of pre-1953 Electros), but standard G-logo Gretsch knobs would be nice. Same with the switch tip: the Gibsonny black plastic could be replaced with the Gretsch variety. The plain black pickguard could be replaced with something dressier.

That leaves the big block fret markers - I'm not crazy about them, but they're kinda baked in and you get used to them - and the undersized, unbound f-holes. They could use some binding (faux or otherwise), but from a design perspective I think they're sleek and elegant, and by no means aesthetically inferior to Gretsch's famous (from some perspectives grotesquely) oversized variety.

ANYway, moral of the story: knowing you both have high and particular standards - and historically operate within some form of frugal financial constraint which would make ordering something to spec from the Custom Shop a significant challenge - just from a money standpoint I think you owe it to yourself to try a 2420. I also remember you as a bold player who relishes something of a wild ride from a gained up full hollowbody, a la The Nuge (or, more tastefully, Steve Howe).

Far from a just-make-do or compromise guitar, I think the 2420 just might be a guitar you thoroughly enjoy for its unique virtues. It's sorta a pre-evolutionary Gretsch, wild and untamed and not particularly polite - a guitar that both demands and rewards some mastery.

Given the price of admission - and if it turned out you liked the ergonomics, feel, and response - you could trick one out with pickups and other hardware upgrades and still come out a little under the price of an Electromatic. And you'd have a guitar I just suspect would suit you better. Given its wide open lively and resonant construction, maybe even as well as a more highly evolved and refined pro-line.


Yeah, and besides all THAT, it's wonderful to see you around the ranch again. You shouldn't feel like you have to own or talk about Gretschs all the time to hang with us. I think of you as an old friend, and it would be nice to have you around regularly again.

33

Hi Ellen,glad to see you in this neck of the woods ! I'm interested in this thread as I'm in the fatter/wider better camp. I have a gibson based off the 350t that has the widest neck I've played outside of classicals.Just shy 1 3/4''. It's an anomaly though. My Country Club neck doesn't bother me as much as the scale,though I play Fenders all the time with no issues, and the aforementioned 350 has a strat scale of 25.5''

– Opie

Hi Opie. Scale length is no big issue for me. I've had Jaguars with 24" scale lengths, and have had 7-strings with 26.5" scale lengths. I've been comfortable playing all of them. For my acostics, I've actually gravitated towards 1.750" wide necks (my Waterloo WL12-MH) and even wider (1.875" for my Taylor 150e 12-string, which is my church band guitar). I can tolerate narrower necks to a point on electrics (no, I will not play a guitar again, with the infamous uber narrow "Speed Neck," Gibson had on their hollowbody, and semi-hollowbody guitars from the late 60s through the 70s [my 70s Les Paul Signature had one of those necks - yeesh!, I don't think it was much wider than 1 9/16" at the nut!]), but thin profile necks are just not my thing.

34

Note: turns out the current batch of 2420s has humpblocks instead of block markers, and a dressier laminated pickguard. Shazam! Nice colors too. Mine is from an earlier round, in gloss walnut (but it's nicely reddish).

35

I can't help you with Gretsch neck sizes. I'm not sure it's entirely predictable, even within the same model group, as specs change slightly with different variations through the models through the years. You'd have to keep a database of the specs you're concerned about for each model number, for each set of tweaks, ideally as kind of a registry with serial numbers and manufacturing dates.

You're never going to get that, because no one consistently collects data in that detail, and because even if someone tried (ask Bax, TartanPhantom, and Ed Ball), individual owners can't possibly be relied upon to measure the same points on their guitars, in the same way - especially not for neck profiles. The industry as a whole has struggled with a ways to quantify and characterize neck shapes. (Which, also, can't be measured in just one place because profiles can change along the length of the neck.)

I'm not even sure that if we said, "yeah, you want to look for model#XXXX, from this year to that year," you could be sure that an individual example you found in the wilds would be consistent with that prediction.

This isn't to say that Gretsch necks get random profiles - I'm sure there's some pattern of consistency, particularly if we consider specs falling across a kind of definable range as "close enough." And I guess it's true that Gretschs generally have kinda thinner necks than the general run of guitars.

But, to my hands, not very obviously so. I don't have the benefit (and sometimes, obviously, liability) of having developed good classical technique - or good technique of any kind - so I find I'm not terribly sensitive to neck profiles. I can certainly feel the difference when I switch from one guitar to another, but I adjust quickly, and don't even find that I can do things better on some necks than on others. String gauge makes more of a difference for me.

There are extremes I have trouble dealing with. I'm comfortable with ball-bat necks of any dimension - until they get so rotund that my teeny tiny you-call-those-man-fingers? simply can't reach their intended targets. (To quantify this, my longest left hand finger is 3.125" from the web to the tip, and my thumb 2.125" using the same coordinates.)

Like you, though, too-thin, too-flat shredder necks wreck me, and for a similar reason. It's not that my thumb gets tired standing higher off the neck to get to the strings (because my thumb is rarely planted properly on the back of the neck); it's more that the whole web of my hand aches from trying somehow to stay away from the wood that isn't there.

I've been lucky that I've only had to part with one guitar (partly) for this reason - a Charvel Surfcaster - but I'm not attracted to shallow, flat shredder-neck guitars in the first place.

Within the wide range of neck depths and profiles I'm comfortable with, I'm much more sensitive to string spacing at the nut - and radius - than to neck shape. I seem to be OK with radii from 9" to 14" or so - and can tolerate a radius steeper than 9" much better than anything flatter than 14". And too-skinny nut-width, forget it. I've offed more guitars for that deficiency than any other.


All that said, maybe I can help a little. I have both an Electro 5420 and a Streamliner 2420, and it's always been my subjective impression that the Streamliner feels chunkier and more substantial. I just dragged them out and put a micrometer on them.

(Part of the reason you'll have trouble getting reliably comparable measurements from owners is that to do a truly accurate job, you have to get strings completely off the neck so you aren't measuring string diameters - and dealing with the variable of "how hard did the guy press the strings down with the jaw of the micrometer?" - not to mention controlling for exactly where along the length of the neck your volunteer layman scientist is taking his reading. Few people are going to take the strings off their neck and take obsessively-controlled measurements to help someone else solve a problem they aren't having. Now, I like you, so I did get the guitars out of their cases for in-hand comparison, and find a protocol that may be useful. I didn't take the strings off the neck, though.)

So here's how I measured: right AT the first fret, I clamped the micrometer on the neck just hard enough to press the strings down to the fret. (So, yeah, you're getting string diameters in my readings - but the comparisons should still hold.) Then I did the same thing at the 9th fret (because at the 12th fret there's too much slippery-slope heel to provide an anchor). These measurements, then, give you the front to back thickness of the neck as your hand would feel it at those locations when fretting.

The meatball measurements bear out my impression (with my "old" Country Club included as a representative of the pro line):

Electromatic 5420
First fret: .932" / 7th Fret: 1.01"

Streamliner 2420
First fret: 1.13" / 7th Fret: 1.45"

2004 Country Club 6196
First fret: .907" / 7th Fret: 1.44"

(Bearing in mind that these are all ish readings, and the presence of digits to the thousandth erroneously implies more precision than actually achieved. Also note that the Electromatic and Streamliner are both strung with 11s, the Country Club with 12s - which matters because, remember, I'm measuring through the strings.)

Still, clearly a difference.

I know you said you're inclined to the pro series - but let me say that I've found the Streamliner an astonishingly good guitar, and not just for the money (which is all I was expecting). I'm delighted it far more than exceeds expectations.

Besides the clearly beefier neck, the neck profile is also noticeably rounder than the Electromatic's. It simply feels like more neck in the hand. Picking up the Electromatic after playing the Streamliner, it's like "wow, now this is a dainty little thing, ainit?" (A sensation which fades quickly, at least for me, as I adjust.)

The Streamliner is also appreciably deeper in body: 2.75" (measured right beside the Bigsby bracket at the butt) vs 2.56" for the Electro. It also feels more open and resonant to me - because it's wide open, lacking the Electro's soundpost. While the Electromatic is refined and composed, very well-mannered, the Streamliner feels more responsive and alive. It actually feels like it's built lighter, more resonant, than the Country Club. (In fact, depending on how loud you're playing, it might want some additional damping - but it's way easier to add this than try to take it away from a too-stiff guitar.)

Now, I wish the Electromatic and Streamliner series had 17" guitars (other than the Tim Armstrong), but until they do, the 2420 kinda serves as the affordable series' big-box model.

Construction, build, fit, finish are all excellent on mine. It's a little simpler, a little plainer than the pro-line - and I'm not judging the materials - but it doesn't feel like a down-market, cheaper guitar. Still, in bone-stock form, I wouldn't call it a replacement for a pro-line.

Issue number one: the pickups just aren't very characterful or distinguished - at least to my ears. They may be better than the generi-buckers in other archtops in something like its class (Ibanez Artcores, for instance) - but they don't make magic Gretsch noises for me. BUT they're in the industry-standard humbucker form factor, so can be replaced by anything. I think I recall you liked Dynasonics; TV makes T-Armonds in humbucker mount, as well as the humbucking-but-Dyna-like Magnatron - and you can get traditional Gretsch surrounds to bring the appearance up a notch. I'm putting Mel Waldorf's amazing Off-Kilter'Trons in mine to cover ever conceivable tone.

Next up for attention would be the nut; if I was tricking out a Streamliner as my main ride, I'd just have a pro-line quality bone-or-otherwise nut installed, with pro dressing. Until that was done, I wouldn't know if the tuners are up to professional snuff. And I might want to replace the tuners with something traditionally Gretschy anyway: Sta-Tites, Imperials.

Strangely enough, I have a Tru-Arc bridge on mine, which seems an improvement over the stock Adjustamatic. I'd also put a Reverend soft spring in the stock Bigsby.

And at that point, we're down to cosmetic niceties. I've come to really like the plastic dome knobs (which remind me of pre-1953 Electros), but standard G-logo Gretsch knobs would be nice. Same with the switch tip: the Gibsonny black plastic could be replaced with the Gretsch variety. The plain black pickguard could be replaced with something dressier.

That leaves the big block fret markers - I'm not crazy about them, but they're kinda baked in and you get used to them - and the undersized, unbound f-holes. They could use some binding (faux or otherwise), but from a design perspective I think they're sleek and elegant, and by no means aesthetically inferior to Gretsch's famous (from some perspectives grotesquely) oversized variety.

ANYway, moral of the story: knowing you both have high and particular standards - and historically operate within some form of frugal financial constraint which would make ordering something to spec from the Custom Shop a significant challenge - just from a money standpoint I think you owe it to yourself to try a 2420. I also remember you as a bold player who relishes something of a wild ride from a gained up full hollowbody, a la The Nuge (or, more tastefully, Steve Howe).

Far from a just-make-do or compromise guitar, I think the 2420 just might be a guitar you thoroughly enjoy for its unique virtues. It's sorta a pre-evolutionary Gretsch, wild and untamed and not particularly polite - a guitar that both demands and rewards some mastery.

Given the price of admission - and if it turned out you liked the ergonomics, feel, and response - you could trick one out with pickups and other hardware upgrades and still come out a little under the price of an Electromatic. And you'd have a guitar I just suspect would suit you better. Given its wide open lively and resonant construction, maybe even as well as a more highly evolved and refined pro-line.


Yeah, and besides all THAT, it's wonderful to see you around the ranch again. You shouldn't feel like you have to own or talk about Gretschs all the time to hang with us. I think of you as an old friend, and it would be nice to have you around regularly again.

– Proteus

Whoah Tim!! As usual, you have TONS of info!!! You pretty much answered my question!! I will look at a Streamliner tomorrow, but you confirmed my suspicion - that the pre-1959 Reissue Country Clubs have heftier necks than the '59 Reissues (when I think about it more, I really didn't have issues with the neck my 2011 'Club had - the neck thickness was acceptable to me).

If I'm wowed by the neck, I'll get a Streamliner, otherwise chances are good that I'll buy the 2012 'Club on Reverb.

A little further disclosure to everybody - I started looking at Country Clubs on Reverb (and to a lesser extent eBay) back in 2019. I just did not have the cash to outright buy one. Oh yeah, and from Day 1, I said "no!" to myself with regards to the '59 Reissue, after my less than stellar experience with one.

Still, Tim, I promise you that I will take a Streamliner for a spin tomorrow. You never know, it could wow me bigtime.

36

Also, though, ominously, I see the listing on gretschguitars.com says, about the current Streamliner neck: "22 medium jumbo frets sit atop the white-bound nato neck with a thin “U”-shaped profile"

Uh-oh. Maybe they've changed the neck from the first version, too. See what you find when you check one out, but you might need to look on the used market for an earlier one. I'd think the block fret markers would be the tell.


Sez Ellen: I will take a Streamliner for a spin tomorrow. You never know, it could wow me bigtime.

But remember, you're looking beneath the pups and hardware for the bones of the thing, as the house remodelers say.

37

Welcome back. Stick around. IIRC you live near Cream City. Can you go there and try various models? You might leave very happy. Good luck.

38

Welcome back. Stick around. IIRC you live near Cream City. Can you go there and try various models? You might leave very happy. Good luck.

– Baba Joe

Yep, I was just at Cream City Music this afternoon. They reopened about a week and a half ago, and as long as it isn't too full, and you wear a face mask (I have one that I wear for work), you can go in the place. They're open tomorrow, so I'll pay them a visit, and yes, they have quite a few Streamliners hanging from the wall.

39

Welcome back. You might want to check out Wildwood Guitars website, they give pretty complete neck dimensions (nut width, depth at 1st and 12th fret) and weights. Other than some really old vintage Gretsches, the biggest neck I ever played on a Gretsch guitar surprisingly was on an Electromatic Corvette. It definitely had a 50's Gibson Les Paul feel to it. Very nice guitar in general. I know you are really looking for a hollowbody and I don't think Gretsch even makes the Electromatic Corvette anymore but I think that Blackrider still has some NOS Corvettes and Street Sounds NYC had a really pristine used one the last time I looked for a super reasonable price. Good luck on your quest.

40

Great to see you back here. Another thing you may want to consider doing is what Howard Roberts did to make the neck on his original Gibson work: Bondo. I too am very specific on what I need for a guitar neck and I understand the frustration.

41

My recently acquired 2014 1959 would be other worldly if it had a fatter neck. I recall the 1967 CG I owned had a fatter neck which felt great for me.

Hi Ellen. I've been away from here for a while as well. I remember when you first joined, your obsession with CC's

42

I wouldn't call the neck on my 2013 6119-59 fat but it had a pleasing soft V to it that I liked very much.

43

Earlier, it was mentioned that the I might want to look into the 6122-1959 Country Gent, due to its nice, wide neck (1.750" at the nut - a nut width I like on my acoustic guitars). I sent off an e-mail to Rocky at Streetsounds asking for neck specs on a '59 Reissue he's sellling on Reverb.

Since my inquiry to Rocky, I remembered that the Country Gent, due to legal issues with using the Country Gent name, was called the 6122-1958 Cuntry Classic (basically a reissue of the 1958 Country Gent). I found one on Reverb, at a price of around $2000 with shipping, and another one on Guitar Center's used gear website going for CHEEEP at $1650.

https://www.guitarcenter.co...

The one on GC's website is a pre-2003 one (I can tell by looking at the photos), which isn't really my thing, but I am still kind of interested on the one on Reverb (which is being sold by a Canadian seller) $1900.

https://reverb.com/item/344...

Does anybody know what the necks are like on the Country Classics? I'm still kind of leaning more towards the 6122-1959, due to its longer scale and wider nut, but for the right price, and the right neck specs, I can be flexible.

44

When I think about "chunky necks" on Gretsch guitars my mind always goes to my '53 Scripty Duo Jet. What I don't know is if the reissue they produced a couple of years back emulates the original spec neck profile. I realize it's not considered a hollowbody... but it's close!! Good luck in your quest!

45

I believe that the 6122-1959 Gent, also known as the Nashville Classic prior to 2007, is the only Country Gentleman with the wider neck. I am pretty sure that the 6122-1958 comes with the standard 1.68 neck. I have a 2005 6122-1959 Nashville Classic and love it. The neck is full, yet not chunky. The Supertron neck / Classic Plus bridge combo is great.

Another consideration might be the Billy Duffy Falcon, which per Rocky’s description for a used one he has for sale, has a wider neck and deep body and Blacktops.

46

I've played the '58, and just don't remember. If JD hadn't quit the Pages, he could report, as he has one.

But I agree it doesn't have a wider nut. Question is whether the neck is chunkier front to back than the usual run of Gretsch necks. Somehow I think it might be.

Have the seller measure it.

And note the '58 is 24.6" scale. And the '59 is a shallower, enclosed body with very different bracing.

47

I've played the '58, and just don't remember. If JD hadn't quit the Pages, he could report, as he has one.

But I agree it doesn't have a wider nut. Question is whether the neck is chunkier front to back than the usual run of Gretsch necks. Somehow I think it might be.

Have the seller measure it.

And note the '58 is 24.6" scale. And the '59 is a shallower, enclosed body with very different bracing.

– Proteus

Yeah, I know the '58 it was shorter scale, than the '59, or any of my Country Clubs. The seller has it listed as being a 2004, with a 25.5" scale length. I just sent him a message about it to clarify things neck dimension-wise. I also sent a message to the seller of the 2012 Country Club asking for the neck thickness at the 1st and 12th frets.

Oh yeah, the 6122-1958 in question, has an enclosed body, with the faux f-holes.

48

Oh yeah, the 6122-1958 in question, has an enclosed body, with the faux f-holes.

OK, yep. I remember. It is deeper, though - which you tend to like. Alas, the '59 really isn't much of a rock guitar - and I'm not typecasting, because I'll use anything for anything, if it works. Or...maybe it's because I keep fatter strings and a wound 3rd on it.

49

Hello, Ellen,

Nothing much to add to this very informative discussion except how very glad I am to have you around. Now that I think about it, seems that it has been just Deed, occasionally, and me, these days. So, if not for our engaging information and banter, then for our need for another Girl around the place, please return often. Stay safe and well,

All My Lovin, Olivia Anne

50

Yeah the Super Chets are kind of cool, but I will admit that I have some concern about the durability of the pickguard mounted controls. Also, I just checked Reverb, and other than one in so-so shape from 1977, that's going far about $2055 (which makes me cringe, due to its condition), the rest are going for well over $3000 each, and the earlier ones are going for over $5000. I'm a bit hesitant to spend that much coin. I don't want to use up all of my unemployment back-pay money on a guitar. I want save a little for the unexpected rainy day.

– EllenGtrGrl

Hi Ellen. The pickguard mounted controls are a hit and miss sort of thing, with just spraying with cleaner often works fine. IMO I agree with you about the prices of those out there now. Only the early ones have the wider, chunkier neck - those went out around the time in '73 when they dropped the gold border around the pickguard. Anything priced over $3K would have to be perfect to warrant that price. Around $2K +/- for a nice one should be about right.

Now there's also the Deluxe Chet which should be cheaper, but rarer, and it doesn't have the control issues as they're the normal array. Can't recall the neck profile but it isn't overly thin and both have the unique cutaway which you need. There's 2 on Reverb, one at $2.5 and $1.9.


Register Sign in to join the conversation