Modern Gretsch Guitars

How to remove the ring from the rear pad?

1

This is the “near mint condition “ guitar I bought from a member on this site. Any suggestions on how to get rid of the ring in the finish from the pad?? It’s a 2003 62 Chet.

2

Looks like the gold edging on the backpad is responsible for the residue/discoloration on the finish. If power buffing with polish doesn't take it out, just put the pad back on and enjoy the guitar. I know it bothers you and that's your privilege of course but this issue isn't on the front of the guitar where it would be instantly noticeable to others when you play or to yourself when on display in a stand or on the wall. While not pretty, it would be an "out of sight, out of mind" situation for me.

When I had my '64 Gent, the only time I even saw the back of my guitar was when I put it on or off and then only at a glance. Hope someone comes up with a solution for you.

3

Looks like the gold edging on the backpad is responsible for the residue/discoloration on the finish. If power buffing with polish doesn't take it out, just put the pad back on and enjoy the guitar. I know it bothers you and that's your privilege of course but this issue isn't on the front of the guitar where it would be instantly noticeable to others when you play or to yourself when on display in a stand or on the wall. While not pretty, it would be an "out of sight, out of mind" situation for me.

When I had my '64 Gent, the only time I even saw the back of my guitar was when I put it on or off and then only at a glance. Hope someone comes up with a solution for you.

– Windsordave

That's well and good, but if there is a way to get rid of it I'd like to try.

Thanks

4

Polishing compound for auto finishes; Meguires or any other paste. Go slow and easy and should buff right out, especially with a poly finish.

5

Can one buy a replacement backpad somewhere? Or do you still have it?

My 67 Nashville had the same issue, but I kept the pad on and never saw it. I think this is common with older guitars--I haven't seen it on a poly finished guitar (but then I've never looked for it, either!). I use Meguirs as been suggested earlier. Good luck.

6

David- please try the same suggestions we gave you in the other thread. They should work.

There is really no point in belaboring things by starting another thread on what is really the same finish issue.

7

I thought I’d get more responses in this category. I tried McGuire swirl and haze remover and it didn’t make any difference.

11

OK, sorry for being flippant.

The next move is more aggressive rubbing compound. And when I've been sufficiently determined to clean up a scratchpile or discoloration, I've resorted to fine sandpaper.

But with either of these, there's perfect assurance that you could rub through the finish if you get too zealous, and that it will require multiple passes with progressively finer compounds to get out the haze you'll create in the process.

And if you sand deep enough, you'll end up with uneven depressions in the finish that are more unsightly (to me) than a slightly discolored ring which is hidden when the standard-equipment backpad is in place.

I'd normally advise to try anything first in an inconspicuous location, but I'd also normally consider under the backpad to be as inconspicuous as a finished area on a guitar gets.

12

I good source for advice may be a quality furniture refinisher. Someone working with refinishing antiques perhaps may have the answer.

13

You could buff it out, like all said above, but unless you're going to set it on a stand and never touch it, it will come back. It's just the nature of it. It's like those bra's people used to put on cars. Sure they keep the bugs off but it's a loose fitting attachment and there will always be some movement/rubbing. the wear signs will return again. They all look like this, after a few years of play.

14

The scratches go below the surface so you'll need to sand them out then buff. Since it isn't too deep I'd start with 800 then go up the chain, 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, 3000 then buff. Make sure you use a small block and keep wiping it with a clean white rag. If you see any traces of color on the rag you need to stop sanding.

16

Sounds like a lot of work for little reward. Once I get the guitar sorted out I'll probably play without the pad to reduce weight.

17

I never understood why Gretsch put a "pad" on the back of guitars?

18

I know this kind of advice is likely to be annoying to you, but I would put the pad back on and commit to doing nothing, at least for a while. Some of the more aggressive treatments being described here are not without risks. If a couple of months from now, the knowledge of the existence of that ring under the pad is still driving you crazy, then I guess you need to exorcise that demon. But you may also find that once the initial irritation that you obviously feel towards this transaction fades, you may no longer care.

19

Originally, I think, the pad was there to hide the big honkin' plastic panel that provided installation and maintenance access to the mute mechanism on guitars so equipped.

Then it migrated to guitars without mutes or that panel, presumably because it seemed (to someone) a deluxe feature. In fact, when I first saw a backpad on a Gent (in my sheltered life, about 1974, I think), it made for a couple moments of awed boggle as I contemplated the majesty of an instrument whose makers so carefully and luxuriously protected it from finish damage.

Seconds later, it dawned on me that protecting the lovely wood on the back from buckle rash came at the cost of screwing 8 big snaps right through the wood. (Like you might prevent sunburn on your back by searing it with a blowtorch first.)

On this particular guitar, there ARE no mutes, so neither the pad nor the panel serve the original purpose. (Yes, the panel makes it easier to get to the wiring harness - but Gretsch routinely installs everything through the pickup holes anyway, so that's no excuse.)

My Falcon bass also has the pad, also for no purpose other than to honor Gretsch tradition.

Bottom line: the pad is historical. If it was there when a model became "iconic," it's there forever.

20

I never understood why Gretsch put a "pad" on the back of guitars?

– Hipbone

Allegedly for comfort. And to prevent buckle wear. I suspect the real reason it was devised was to hide the large access panel required by the mute system. But they did occasionally use it on models with no mute, like some Princesses, so I guess they really did use it for comfort too. In the case of the early muteless 6122-62, I would presume it was used for historical accuracy.

21

Proteus beat me to it.


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