Modern Gretsch Guitars

How many wraps around the tuning pole do you go?

1

My 2006 6120 is having some tuning issues. Always has, but I'd like to play it more. Wondering if less or more wraps is better. With a zero fret, can I go a bit deeper on the nut and use the slots as more of an alignment guide? Thanks

2

More is better. Get as many on the ferrule as you can in a single file.

3

Our buddy Bear posted this video once. It's very helpful @ 3:14

3-4 wraps should be the most, IMO.

4

Make the first wrap above the string through, then 3-4 wraps below. This locks the string securely. Tip of the hat to Charlie Vegas who shared this hint a while back and it really works.

5

Make the first wrap above the string through, then 3-4 wraps below. This locks the string securely. Tip of the hat to Charlie Vegas who shared this hint a while back and it really works.

– lx

+1

This is how I have always strung up every single one of my guitars and I've never had a tuning issue.

6

I always use a minimum of 3 wraps on a wound string and 4 - 5 or so on a plain string. I've always heard that 3 wraps should do it, but the plain strings seem to stabilize more quickly when I use more.

7

I side with BB... 4 wraps on wire and 3 on wound seems to be the best for me over a fairly wide variety of necks and string combos. Also, the consistency is easier to remember, especially when you might be in a bit of a hurry (like say, onstage).

And yes, where possible, one wrap up and the rest down helps stability.

fwiw

8

I’m so glad someone asked. Was just about to restring.

9

What beatbyrd said.

10

Lube the nut and bridge saddles should be the first step in trouble shooting tuning issues. String winds matter too, but break out the lube.

11

Lube the nut and bridge saddles should be the first step in trouble shooting tuning issues. String winds matter too, but break out the lube.

– Mr_Christopher

Thanks for all of your winding tips fellas! What sort of lube would you suggest?

12

Lube the nut and bridge saddles should be the first step in trouble shooting tuning issues. String winds matter too, but break out the lube.

– Mr_Christopher

Thanks for all of your winding tips fellas! What sort of lube would you suggest?

13

Our buddy Bear posted this video once. It's very helpful @ 3:14

3-4 wraps should be the most, IMO.

– Suprdave

Thanks, that is one slick tip.

14

I'm with many here in having the first wind above the string through and 3 wraps below for the wound strings, and 4 or 5 wraps for the plain strings. I use a couple of extra winds on the plain strings as due to their thinness, this gets them lower on the post to match the wound strings. And all winds below the string through should never overlap!

One thing should be remembered here for the re-stringing exercise and that's that it's important to have the string low on tuning post so it has to rise going to the nut. This, combined with the slots being angled towards their respective tuner (where required) creates a strong break point at the front edge of the nut. Combined with the slots having the proper contour, you should be good to go for eliminating tuning issues at the nut.

Some swear by using nut oil and/or graphite in the slots but I never have and have no tuning issues. It's a case of whatever blows your skirt up.

15

Strings don't necessarily stretch much, but they do tend to settle into place and become more snug at the ends, especially where they make sharp turns. There can be gaps between the windings around the post that narrow or close with time as well. If you have tuning issues, check to make sure that the ends are stable (pull the turns tight, press bends flush if pulling doesn't work, skootch the strings up if they are wound low on the post) before you even look for problems elsewhere (nut, bridge, tuners, or vibrato unit).

The advice here is good; strings often don't need more than about one and half turns to be stable, but one over/three under is a very good rule of thumb.

16

Strings don't necessarily stretch much, but they do tend to settle into place and become more snug at the ends, especially where they make sharp turns. There can be gaps between the windings around the post that narrow or close with time as well. If you have tuning issues, check to make sure that the ends are stable (pull the turns tight, press bends flush if pulling doesn't work, skootch the strings up if they are wound low on the post) before you even look for problems elsewhere (nut, bridge, tuners, or vibrato unit).

The advice here is good; strings often don't need more than about one and half turns to be stable, but one over/three under is a very good rule of thumb.

17

I do two wraps on sta-tites on my jet and never have issues

18

As many as needed to get in tune. No more, no less.

19

If I were sassier with the internets, I’d post that clip from Monty Python and the Holy Grail - “Three! Three shall be the number to which you shall count!”

20

I pull the string through, give it a sharp bend and then go one over and about two under.
And for Fender type tuners the wound strings get two wraps and the thin strings 3 or 4. Only the G string gets more wraps to get a good break angle.

22

How awkward, I feel like a massive slob. I often don’t have a single full wind on the peg, I just thread the string through, bend it back and hook it under the string. I like that it reduces the need to stretch the new string and that it renders the tuning pretty stable with a Bigsby.

What am I missing? Does it affect the tone?

23

Guitar techs will tell you "less is best", too many wraps can take a long time to settle in, and cause you tuning difficulties until they're all snug.

I generally use 2 wraps on the low E, 3 wraps on the rest of the strings. It's how I was taught by a Luthier many years ago.

24

Our buddy Bear posted this video once. It's very helpful @ 3:14

3-4 wraps should be the most, IMO.

– Suprdave

Omg, I’ve been searching for that video! Thanks for sharing again!


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