Modern Gretsch Guitars

Gretsch adjustable pinned bridge bases?

1

Don’t know if this has been mentioned previously but I was changing the strings on my vintage select 59 6120 and noticed the bridge base has 2 lines instead of the customary small holes for the corresponding pins. My 2016 55 golden era didn’t have it. Pretty nifty I thought.

2

Don’t know if this has been mentioned previously but I was changing the strings on my vintage select 59 6120 and noticed the bridge base has 2 lines instead of the customary small holes for the corresponding pins. My 2016 55 golden era didn’t have it. Pretty nifty I thought.

– Hollerbody

My new Black Falcon has those too. I’m on the fence. On one hand you can intonate to your own taste, but doesn’t that defeat the purpose? Also, you have to reintonate between string changes unless you put tape underneath. Which is what I did.

3

I see your point. Hmmm guess you can’t have your cake and eat too I suppose.

4

Bridge pinning: the solution in search of a problem.

5

A lot of the kids freak out when they first change strings and the bridge falls off.

6

I know. And I'm all for pinning...if just the pinners always get the base at the long-established, industry-standard, accordin'-to-physics correct position for best straight-line, uncompensated intonation. Sure, an adjustable-saddle bridge with enough travel will usually let you compensate for a misplaced base - but (besides complicating my life as an bridge-aftermarketeer) it's a little like using a trim strip to cover up sloppy joinery.

This slotting on the bottom of the base shown is obviously an attempt to provide fore-aft adjustability while keeping most of the benefits of pinning. But most Gretsch bases have just two holes on each side underneath. It's possible this one ended up with a groove because its optimum position on the grub screws in the guitar top ended up coming BETWEEN where the holes were - and the tech responsible for final assembly and intonation did what he had to do.

That's not a bad thing; it's what "custom" really means.

And, either resulting from the intersection of several subtle factors - or from sunspots - the perfect position for a bridge can differ between two examples of the same model. Nutty, but validated by the experience of any techs who've worked on enough guitars.

7

My 2017 VS jet just had the round holes, maybe they only do this on the hollowbodies since they may be more unstable with climate changes etc and you may need a little more adjustment? I thibk its a good idea, the bridge can't shift from side to side still but you get a little intonation option.

8

I've found the direct contact of an unpinned, well sanded bridge base is best bet for good tone. A bit of rosin underneath keeps the base in place.

9

Isn't the purpose of pinning to stop side to side movement when bending using lighter strings? Don't different gauge strings require slightly different bridge locations for correct intonation? I think the slots are a GREAT idea if you have to have a pinned bridge.

Line up a piece of blue painters tape behind each foot of the bridge before you take the strings off and you'll know where the bridge is supposed to be.

10

Why is anyone taking all the strings off when changing them? One at a time.

11

Why is anyone taking all the strings off when changing them? One at a time.

– Charlie Vegas

Makes it too difficult to clean the fretboard and polish n buff the frets

12

Makes it too difficult to clean the fretboard and polish n buff the frets

– Hollerbody

That's what I'm talking about.

13

I agree, good idea. My ‘59 VS has the grooves.


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