Modern Gretsch Guitars

G6120EC case issue ?

1

Hi everyone, Don't know if I have to make a presentation as in other forums. If so let me know and show me where to do it I didn't find the place. I'm a happy owner of a brand new G6120EC and I love it. I'm wondering about the case coming with it and specialy about the handle that I find one of the fixation point too loose and may break and lead to a accidental opening exposing the guitar. Even if my case is a little bit different this a video in which you can see what I'm trying to explain (in a correct english I hope). Link Does any of you have to deal with such issues ?

2

If it is brand new I would return the case and request a new one.

3

G6120EC...

Didn't know Clapton played Gretsches...

4

Welcome to the GDP frdc13. I'm glad you found us. I watched the video, and cringed a bit, if your case is anything like the one in the video, I would return it and see if if a different one would be any better. Good luck with it, I hope hope you get a better one, should you decide to exchange it.

6

Welcome to the GDP frdc13. I'm glad you found us. I watched the video, and cringed a bit, if your case is anything like the one in the video, I would return it and see if if a different one would be any better. Good luck with it, I hope hope you get a better one, should you decide to exchange it.

– Wade H

Thanks all for your answers. I tried to exchange it. The dealer sent me another one quite fast, but it was worst than the one coming with the guitar. So I returned the second one and explained what I've found anoying with those cases. I sent the video as example and sent a video of my faulty case. The dealer brought Fender in the discussion (hope this is correct english... ). The dealer checked another guitar he had in stock ; same faulty case ! Fender answered to the dealer : it's NORMAL to have one handle fixation point loose and the other one tight. So I brought the story to Gretsch USA : they could'nt do anything else than proposing to reach Fender GB (the Fender consumer service for France). After many mails, trying to make them doing their job, no way ! The answer was : the case coming with the guitar is just like that and is free. If you're not satisfied with the product, return it (guitar + case). If this guitar had a greater quality case, the price would be higher (???? don't you just told me the case is free ????). This is how Fender treats their costumers, it"s not acceptable but I can't do nothing else except trying to harass the dealer who's not in cause ! It's a shame for Grestch and Fender. Don't know what can I do now.

7

I own an Eddie Cochran model and checked my case, mine does the same thing. So what. What a silly thing to get worked up over.

8

Yeah, I checked mv cases and Ray do that too. It’s just how they are made. You can buy heavier duty cases, but they cost 2 to 4 times as much.

9

I own an Eddie Cochran model and checked my case, mine does the same thing. So what. What a silly thing to get worked up over.

– Bluecap

Just sharing experience. If you're OK with your case, that's fine. I'm not and think that play on the handle is not the way it should be, no matter the price of the case.

10

Yeah, I checked mv cases and Ray do that too. It’s just how they are made. You can buy heavier duty cases, but they cost 2 to 4 times as much.

– JBGretschGuy

Thanks for checking. You're right but IMHO the way they are made is wrong and not safe for the guitar. My silly working up post is just there to report the "failure" and may be lead to product improvement.

11

Not a “failure”. I’ve been checking my cases. Gretsch, Gibson, Hofner, Guild, cases from the 40s, 50s, 60s, 70s, new cases and guess what. They are all designed that way. They all have play in the handle, most with one connector stationary, solidly locked down and the other with play and some with play on both connectors. There is likely a reason they chose to design cases like this as it is so internationally common. So, it’s not a failure and not a function of modern cases or Gretsch cases or less expensive cases. As they say in software development, It’s a feature, not a bug.

12

Not a “failure”. I’ve been checking my cases. Gretsch, Gibson, Hofner, Guild, cases from the 40s, 50s, 60s, 70s, new cases and guess what. They are all designed that way. They all have play in the handle, most with one connector stationary, solidly locked down and the other with play and some with play on both connectors. There is likely a reason they chose to design cases like this as it is so internationally common. So, it’s not a failure and not a function of modern cases or Gretsch cases or less expensive cases. As they say in software development, It’s a feature, not a bug.

– Bob Howard

Thanks for the feedback. None of them have broke ?

13

None of mine have broke in 40 years.

14

Most of mine - from EVERY brand - have play in BOTH attachment brackets. Some have more wiggle, some have less. None show any indication of falling apart. Of many (many many) musical instrument cases in my custody, I have had these problems:

• 1932 National resonator: before I got it in 198x, the original leather handle apparently snapped, and was replaced. The brackets on the case remain secure, and the replacement leather handle has been reliable. However, both hinges on the back broke free of the chipboard at some point. I tie some thick closeline around it to keep it closed. (I'd use a bungee cord, but it doesn't seem period-correct for the instrument.)

• Wurlitzer Cougar/Wildcat case, 60s: handles have held, but the case itself has cracked under the tolex along several bearing edges. It's common to this design, found in most Wurli (and similar) cases of the type. No guitar has ever fallen out.

• Gibson "Protector" case, 80s: (all molded thermoplastic, with integrated plastic latches): one of the latches eventually snapped off. The other held (and is still holding). The guitar was never in danger.

• 1979 Gibson ES-335, standard wood/tolex case: plastic handle broke away from the brackets (which are nice and tight). I replaced the plastic with a buckled padded leather handle probably 25 years ago. No problem since.

In fact, I think the latter failure may illustrate WHY the brackets are designed with some wiggle room - because if they're perfectly tight, then all the stress (and sometimes rotational torque) from motion inherent in lifting and carrying the case is transferred ONLY through the molded ends of the plastic handle, eventually degrading them into likely points of failure. If the bracket is also free to wiggle in its housing, some of the energy can be absorbed there, preventing premature failure of the handle itself. As long as the bracket housing is securely fastened to the side of the case, none of these wiggles matter functionally.

So my failure rate for the connection of the handle bracket to the case, over 50 years and hundreds of cases...is exactly zero. It's true I'm not a touring professional. If I was a touring professional, I'd buy a proper road case for the road guitars, with better crush resistance, metal framing, etc. But experience leads me to conclude that TKL (and practically every other brand of) guitar cases are more than sufficient to the needs of most guitarists, for most purposes.

I think you've made the determination that the case is "faulty" based on insufficient evidence, and are now trying to hold Gretsch/FMIC/TKL's feet to the fire of your misplaced outrage.

the case coming with the guitar is just like that and is free. If you're not satisfied with the product, return it (guitar + case). If this guitar had a greater quality case, the price would be higher (???? don't you just told me the case is free ????).

Think this through. The case is priced into the cost of the guitar, "free" to you only because it's not a separate line item. You're still paying for it. Gretsch/FMIC has to pay for it. If they included a "better" case (whatever that would be by your definition), and it was more costly, the price of the whole package would have to increase.

With all due respect, I'd advise you to enjoy your guitar and let go of your obsession with this apparent non-flaw of the case. As I mentioned above, the wiggle in the bracket may well be an intentional design feature which makes the case MORE secure, not less.


And really, that video. Guy gets a new thing, doesn't like a wiggling handle - and the VERY DAY he gets it, makes a self-righteous morally-outraged whining entitlement video to tell the world? Without first doing any research (he apparently has the internet...), calling customer service, or whatever? Technological empowerment clearly has its downside. Please let him not buy something from me.

15

My thoughts exactly, Tim. Entitlement at its finest. Trying to shame a brand for some imaginary problem is.... shameful.

17

For what it is worth, I looked at a half-dozen of my guitar cases & also found one attachment point tight and the other attachment point loose on all of them.

I think they are all TKL cases. None of the handles have broken, and they range from about 2 to 20 years old.

Long story short, I believe that the metal pieces that are perpendicular to the side of the case, do not need to be immobilized to serve their intended purpose.

I wouldn't worry about your case's handle, but if you're still unhappy with it a luggage-repair shop could probably replace it for you.

18

Not a “failure”. I’ve been checking my cases. Gretsch, Gibson, Hofner, Guild, cases from the 40s, 50s, 60s, 70s, new cases and guess what. They are all designed that way. They all have play in the handle, most with one connector stationary, solidly locked down and the other with play and some with play on both connectors. There is likely a reason they chose to design cases like this as it is so internationally common. So, it’s not a failure and not a function of modern cases or Gretsch cases or less expensive cases. As they say in software development, It’s a feature, not a bug.

– Bob Howard

Agree with Bob! I have 2 Gretsch, 1 Gibson, and 4 Guild cases I am looking at right now, all made by TKL for these specific guitars (all top-of-the-line instruments), and they are all like that. Even the two I have from the 80s don’t function or feel any different from the brand new ones. It’s simply the way they are made. And they work just fine! I use them all the time! I also have a couple of injection-molded jumbo cases that I use if my guitars are going to be packed in tight with a bunch of other gear, and the handles are exactly the same. It’s a feature, not a flaw. I have never, in decades of live performances, had one fail. And the video about the latches? Just. Plain. Silly.

So... how do you like the guitar?

19

All my cases are made this way; the handle wiggles from the attached point. I’m thinking the case is designed this way on purpose. I’ve never had a case handle fail, and I’m not to gentle with a case.

20

I'll be another endorser of "nothing to see here." Mine are all like that as well. It's never been an issue.

21

Now, the case on my 1981 BST, that's another issue. That one has had hasp issues from the beginning and I just know to carry it on my right side, and extend my first two fingers down the outside edge to keep it from popping open.

22

My thoughts exactly, Tim. Entitlement at its finest. Trying to shame a brand for some imaginary problem is.... shameful.

– JBGretschGuy

It's not my goal. The consumer service was not very explicit and their answer was a politicaly correct : don't care ! And THIS is a shame for any consumer service. Nothing more. If they took time to explain as folks are doing here, I wouldn't have share this story. I'm not an expert about guitars or guitar gear. So I take my questions to pages like here to learn from more experienced people.

23

None of mine have broke in 40 years.

– Bob Howard

Great news ! Thanx

24

@Proteus

I think you've made the determination that the case is "faulty" based on insufficient evidence,

You're right and this why I share that story seeking for experienced user advices.

and are now trying to hold Gretsch/FMIC/TKL's feet to the fire of your misplaced outrage.

Not really, I'm more angry about the way they answered in a "I don't care" manner (not Gretsch but Fender... well none of them have took the time to explain - may be they're ignorant as I am - hope I don't make english mistakes leading to be misunderstood ).

Think this through. The case is priced into the cost of the guitar, "free" to you only because it's not a separate line item. You're still paying for it. Gretsch/FMIC has to pay for it. If they included a "better" case (whatever that would be by your definition), and it was more costly, the price of the whole package would have to increase.

This was what I meant in my ironic question : (???? don't you just told me the case is free ????)

With all due respect, I'd advise you to enjoy your guitar and let go of your obsession with this apparent non-flaw of the case. As I mentioned above, the wiggle in the bracket may well be an intentional design feature which makes the case MORE secure, not less.

My obsession led me here to share the story. So thanks to it because I learned a lot from your contribution.

25

Agree with Bob! I have 2 Gretsch, 1 Gibson, and 4 Guild cases I am looking at right now, all made by TKL for these specific guitars (all top-of-the-line instruments), and they are all like that. Even the two I have from the 80s don’t function or feel any different from the brand new ones. It’s simply the way they are made. And they work just fine! I use them all the time! I also have a couple of injection-molded jumbo cases that I use if my guitars are going to be packed in tight with a bunch of other gear, and the handles are exactly the same. It’s a feature, not a flaw. I have never, in decades of live performances, had one fail. And the video about the latches? Just. Plain. Silly.

So... how do you like the guitar?

– Steve

Thanks for sharing your experience.

The guitar is awesome !


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