Modern Gretsch Guitars

2002 T6122-12 (prototype?) on CL

1

I came across this 12-string on Craigslist: https://sfbay.craigslist.or...

I'm not interested in buying it, but I'm a little curious about it, and thought others might be interested. I tried to find something similar in the database here, and found a couple of similar things, but didn't find an exact match.

The "O.K. Card" indicates "T6122-12; Proto"; and the pickguard says "Country Classic I" (at least I think that's a "I" ?); and a date from 2002.

My initial gut reaction was that the shaping of the cutaways looked a little suspect, but other than that it looks legit to me. If it is indeed a prototype, perhaps this might be an exciting find for someone...?

2

It does look rather awesome! Shame they didn't reverse the order of the strings.

3

No way that this was made in the USA. By who at that time?

4

Should be a model/serial# label inside the f-hole and as well as gold numbers on the back of the headstock. If not, it could be as advertised. 2002 was before FMIC got involved so not made in the USA.

5

My guess is that it was made in Japan on the regular production line. I get that it’s a prototype, but there wouldn’t be any production facility here to make it.

6

Ive no Idea what it is but it comes close to...

7

Ive no Idea what it is but it comes close to...

– ChimingBell

Ha! I have that album. It’s pristine. I paid a dollar for it.

9

The more I look into this, the more confused I become. If this is a "prototype", how does that relate to the fact that this already existed: http://gretschpages.com/gui... Could it have been a prototype for the 5422-12?

And why does this guitar appear to have a "I" on the pickguard, rather than a "II", since it's a double-cutaway model?

10

I'm not sure "II" refers to double-cutaway. It's been my impression that it referred to a kind of second-generation take on the model, with some modernizing features as compared to the originals.

11

Also, a guitar from 2002 would not be a prototype for a 5400-series, which wasn't introduced till 2012. (Or was it 2014?)

Also also, the term "prototype" could mean almost anything. I suppose an advance prototype might be made at a factory in one country as a proof of concept for an eventual build elsewhere. But as "make a 12-string Gent" hardly pioneers any new territory, I would think a production prototype is all that would be needed. That would almost certainly come from the plant which would ultimately build the guitars.

From the model number, slightly wonky cutaways, and pre-FMIC tuners, I'd peg that as a Fred-era prototype for a model that never happened. (Notwithstanding its similarity to the 6122-12 that emerged around 2006 from FMIC.)

The notion that it's "incredibly rare" is unremarkable and self-evident. A prototype that led to no production model is by definition "rare" - but that doesn't necessarily translate to "valuable." The fact that it appears not to have become a production model (in that form) almost delegitimizes it, as if Gretsch didn't think enough of it to move to a production run.

Could be a fine guitar in its own right - but to me it's not worth more than a good example of the eventual FMIC model.

Guy's asking at least 1,000 - 1,500 more than I think it will prove to bring.

12

I'm not sure "II" refers to double-cutaway. It's been my impression that it referred to a kind of second-generation take on the model, with some modernizing features as compared to the originals.

– Proteus

Thanks Tim. Not being as much of a (real, authentic, long-time) Gretsch aficionado as many here, I was trusting the info on the linked database page.

13

I have no authoritative reference for that claim, it's just based on my observation.

14

Also, a guitar from 2002 would not be a prototype for a 5400-series, which wasn't introduced till 2012. (Or was it 2014?)

Also also, the term "prototype" could mean almost anything. I suppose an advance prototype might be made at a factory in one country as a proof of concept for an eventual build elsewhere. But as "make a 12-string Gent" hardly pioneers any new territory, I would think a production prototype is all that would be needed. That would almost certainly come from the plant which would ultimately build the guitars.

From the model number, slightly wonky cutaways, and pre-FMIC tuners, I'd peg that as a Fred-era prototype for a model that never happened. (Notwithstanding its similarity to the 6122-12 that emerged around 2006 from FMIC.)

The notion that it's "incredibly rare" is unremarkable and self-evident. A prototype that led to no production model is by definition "rare" - but that doesn't necessarily translate to "valuable." The fact that it appears not to have become a production model (in that form) almost delegitimizes it, as if Gretsch didn't think enough of it to move to a production run.

Could be a fine guitar in its own right - but to me it's not worth more than a good example of the eventual FMIC model.

Guy's asking at least 1,000 - 1,500 more than I think it will prove to bring.

– Proteus

Tim, Joe C kicked off the intro to the 5400 series at the 2012 KC Roundup. Several were given away, and availability to the general public was a few months later, once Gretsch got the pipeline full.

15

I remembered the event, but not the year.

16

I remembered the event, but not the year.

– Proteus

One of the few events that I remember, and the year that it happened! Lol


Register Sign in to join the conversation