Meet & Greet

2 Gretsch’s 1 week. Hi i am new here

26

Thanks y'all.

I am a gear nut positively suffused with G.A.S.

I also hope to make that neck heel.

Yeah low brow levity but hey this aint network.

Thanks again for the welcome.

27

Welcome, I see that you live in Tucson, I'm a few miles up the road in Glendale. That's a sweet guitar at a great price, Congratulations.

28

Well an update to the double anny model.

The place I am taking it to for the real serious work says that 600 to 800 is the basic estimate for the repairs.

The neck is twisted and needs refret, shaved, re-set and rebound.

the tail pin repaired.

the pots replaced.

and who knows so far what else.

I wonder if it is worth it to pay so much.

I paid with tax and all 650. with the repairs I will be in the 1200 to 1600 hundred range.

OUCH!!!!

What y'all think?

30

I would get a second opinion on the neck or even a third, compare and go to the one you feel is most reasonable. Are they talking about removing the fretboard?? Or just correcting by 'shaving/planing/sanding the fretboard itself If the latter then rebinding(unless the binding is rotten) isn't really necessary.

Definitely get a couple more opinions before making any decisions.

I wouldn't bother with replacing the pots, a bit of contact cleaner sprayed in them would probably clear any issues up with them. I've never had to replace any outright. That sounds dubious.

What's up with the end pin?? Isn't it the screw in type with a knurled strap knob.

31

If that total is in fact the final costs, I'd say you're in the ballpark for its value. It is a double pup model so that adds a bit more value as 2 pup versions tend to be more sought after.

Obviously the majority of the repair cost will be to the neck and my first impression from your post regarding the neck being twisted is a huge red flag if this were my guitar. I know the guitar is old, but following all the work that could be required to repair that twist plus the refret, finishing etc costs who's to say the twisting has stopped? My gut says to replace the neck with a new one from Gretsch. A new neck needs new frets and rebinding, finishing too, so that cost is the same and you'd be getting a neck that is straight. Given the end value, I wouldn't want to sink that much cost into a guitar I still might have doubts about, regardless of how fine a luthier doing the twisting repair might be. And with a new neck you might consider having the headstock bound as well.....just sayin'.

Depending on costs and how much or if you may covet this guitar when the work's done, you could go whole hog and refinish the entire guitar to the cool two tone smoky green. Though I'm not sure by how much, I'm certain it would add a bit of value, that color combo being far more sought after than a sunburst. It's been considered one of Gretsch's finest finishes.

Edit: I'd like to hear Curt's comments on the costs listed for the neck vs a new neck and putting on it what's required.

32

However you approach it, it's time, money, and an investment of attention.

Unless this guitar is especially meaningful to you, or you're pretty sure it will be when it's done, I'd sell it along to someone who really wants this model, and relishes everything about the process.

From the fact that you're here asking about it, and experiencing some sticker shock at the probable restoration costs, I'm thinking maybe this guitar isn't meant for you.

Move it along and get something that completely lights you up.

33

If that total is in fact the final costs, I'd say you're in the ballpark for its value. It is a double pup model so that adds a bit more value as 2 pup versions tend to be more sought after.

Obviously the majority of the repair cost will be to the neck and my first impression from your post regarding the neck being twisted is a huge red flag if this were my guitar. I know the guitar is old, but following all the work that could be required to repair that twist plus the refret, finishing etc costs who's to say the twisting has stopped? My gut says to replace the neck with a new one from Gretsch. A new neck needs new frets and rebinding, finishing too, so that cost is the same and you'd be getting a neck that is straight. Given the end value, I wouldn't want to sink that much cost into a guitar I still might have doubts about, regardless of how fine a luthier doing the twisting repair might be. And with a new neck you might consider having the headstock bound as well.....just sayin'.

Depending on costs and how much or if you may covet this guitar when the work's done, you could go whole hog and refinish the entire guitar to the cool two tone smoky green. Though I'm not sure by how much, I'm certain it would add a bit of value, that color combo being far more sought after than a sunburst. It's been considered one of Gretsch's finest finishes.

Edit: I'd like to hear Curt's comments on the costs listed for the neck vs a new neck and putting on it what's required.

– Windsordave

uhhh Dave How many guitar's have you repaired? We're talking about a 50 year old piece of wood here. Annnd the opinion of ONE luthier, who on the whole are honest. but some , like mechanics want to exaggerate problems to make $$(It is a hard business.) Jumping to conclusions and saying a fellow should replace his guitars neck based upon your arm chair opinions, isn't exactly helpful.

And refinishing ?? refinishing an old guitar that has a decent existing finish with a new finish is NOT going to increase it's value at all, quite the opposite.

I say you might as well grind the whole guitar into dust, mix it with epoxy and shape it into a perfect copy of Dave's Super Chet which is an instrument designed in heaven by Chet Atkin's just for Dave with the help of angelic super aliens....just sayin....

Any opinions from afar are just that, opinions.

Before you listen to any of us armchair yahoos. Take it into a couple more local techs who can actually look at it in person and see what the real deal is. DON'T tell them how much you paid for it, make sure they know you can't invest a lot into it, and say you want a quote on just what HAS to be done to make the guitar playable.

Then make your decisions. Knowing you are likely better informed

Personally I would think most responsible techs would suggest you clean pots before replacing them, ESPECIALLY in a vintage instrument. the rest is speculation.

Get more hands on opinions (and not here !! )

p.s. Dave HATES sunbursts!!! (I'm not a big fan either but I can accept that others like them and they are allowed to exist)

34

Get a couple of estimates and then decide to either fix, sell or keep for a while as an unrepaired fun beater. My guess is that it’s value won’t drop much below the $650 regardless.

35

The pots are my idea. The tail pin is bent into the body. It appears to have been dropped from a somewhat significant height.

The guy I use I have for years and is a trustworthy guy him and his partner. Many of the techs here in Tucson Have already screwed me so they are a no go.

The neck appears to be twisted. He says with a shave and refret it may be just fine. The estimate given is a worst case scenario.

The binding is already mostly shot and the neck work will nail it's coffin shut. They are able to pretty well match the patina and make it look good.

The neck work is in 400 range. The reset if needed is 200 range and the other stuff is usually a throw in unless parts are needed.

It play pretty well up to the 12th fret as I have stated before, after that its bailing wire in a shoe box....if that good.

So I am trying to decide if its a money pit and should be ditched or if I am really wanting to add this old USA hollow bodied beauty to the stable.

I am digging the 5420 I just got so a non whammied version is a much desired plot twist. I am not an accomplished whammulator. I block my strats and have since the late 70s. Except of course wen I owned and love my hard tail strats like the 78 beauty in the pic of one of my play areas.

so this 6117 is wanted just the expense is a thought provoker.

I am not buying to resell but still..........

I like the guitar that's the problem

The last hollow I had was a 1956 Supro Ranchero and it was a blast but truly a different animal from either of these Gretsch's.

Thanks for advice folks please keep it coming.

37

Thanks for the 65 catalog. I do wish i could look at it. It keeps the pages hidden to the left of the screen and the shy little boogers wont come out.

Thanks for the welcome. I had many years ago a gretsch or two. I also jobbered and worked at a so cal guitar center, so many passed through my hands.

I am a tele/strat guy. The fact is though that the gretsch hallowbody sound is so unique and heard distinctly that i feel one needs an example or two in the git pantheon that is my lot in life.

Now all i need is to siphon the talent of Chet/Brian as Darth might say.

"My training is complete."

Thanks for the welcome folks look forward to mercilessly bending your ears (virtually of course).

– Eyerish

Get yourself to a "Gretsch Roundup" and bend our ears, literally. Welcome Home. Olivia Anne

38

Howdy Eye, welcome to the Round Up. Lottsa good folks and Gretsch info here .

39

uhhh Dave How many guitar's have you repaired? We're talking about a 50 year old piece of wood here. Annnd the opinion of ONE luthier, who on the whole are honest. but some , like mechanics want to exaggerate problems to make $$(It is a hard business.) Jumping to conclusions and saying a fellow should replace his guitars neck based upon your arm chair opinions, isn't exactly helpful.

And refinishing ?? refinishing an old guitar that has a decent existing finish with a new finish is NOT going to increase it's value at all, quite the opposite.

I say you might as well grind the whole guitar into dust, mix it with epoxy and shape it into a perfect copy of Dave's Super Chet which is an instrument designed in heaven by Chet Atkin's just for Dave with the help of angelic super aliens....just sayin....

Any opinions from afar are just that, opinions.

Before you listen to any of us armchair yahoos. Take it into a couple more local techs who can actually look at it in person and see what the real deal is. DON'T tell them how much you paid for it, make sure they know you can't invest a lot into it, and say you want a quote on just what HAS to be done to make the guitar playable.

Then make your decisions. Knowing you are likely better informed

Personally I would think most responsible techs would suggest you clean pots before replacing them, ESPECIALLY in a vintage instrument. the rest is speculation.

Get more hands on opinions (and not here !! )

p.s. Dave HATES sunbursts!!! (I'm not a big fan either but I can accept that others like them and they are allowed to exist)

– Toxophilite

I didn't jump to any conclusions but rather offered up a second route that could be taken depending on the costs to repair vs the costs to replace.....and that logic doesn't require being a luthier to comment on. And offering other choices is helpful. It may give an option not yet considered and then discounted due in part to information not put in the original post, ie costs for the neck repairs vs cost of a new one.

I suggested possibly changing the finish, again as a possible thought if the OP went the route of replacing the neck, which would need finishing anyway. Again, just a possibility to consider and besides, I wasn't suggesting he change the finish on a vintage 6120, but rather an Annie, of which the iconic two tone green finish most often, all things being equal, commands a higher price, and who knows, he may even prefer the green over the sunburst. This suggestion has nothing to do with my dislike of sunbursts but is just another opinion, which after all is what the OP solicited with his posting. Oh BTW, I didn't crap on sunburst finishes; you just assumed any comment from myself is derogatory.

The OP had what appeared to him to be a bit of an enigma and asked us our thoughts. My thoughts are as valid as anyone else's and don't deserve ridicule. The entire point of soliciting opinions is to see if there's something you hadn't considered, be it from an expert such as Curt or a member with some guitars and decide from there.

You offered helpful comments to the OP's predicament, some of which he addressed, and that just adds to his growing base of knowledge of what he has available to consider moving forward.

It deserves mentioning, that putting a smiley face after your comments directed towards myself and my comments doesn't negate the condescending flavor of your comments or be of any assistance to the OP.

I apologize to the OP for this minor derail to his interesting dilemma.

40

Your right Dave I was a little hard on you It was intended to be silly but I can see how you would take it otherwise You often play a little rough so I thought you could take it. I apologize!

However I will still maintain that refinshing a vintage guitar, unless it has a seriously compromised finish already will not increase it's value, rather the opposite to most people buying. I'm not against the idea i just don't at all agree it will increase in value. It will decrease.

And re-necking I think would be cost prohibitive and also have the same effect as refinishing to most buyers. If a twist can be fixed by a fretboard shave then it's probably not that bad to the point of replacing the neck in my opinion.

The OP paid $500+ for the guitar. he could still sink another $800-1000 into it and it would retain that value if not increase over time.

Anyway it sounds like the OP has things sorted out and he has a guy he trusts so that's cool and I hope he enjoys the guitar if he decides to keep it If he can fix it for $800 or under and get a good player I think he could still sell it and make money if he so desired. Even if it cost $1000 that's pretty well on the money for an Annie in good cosmetic and playing condition from what I remember.


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