Gretsch Events

It was just a week ago today - or - All you need is Abbey Road on t…

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A little belated, and a lot brief, being my tired-old-man impressions of a day in the life of Abbey Road on the River, 2018 edition.

We know where we all live, right?


Held for the second year on the Hoosier side of the Ohio River across the re-purposed pedestrian bridge from Louisville in the newly refurbished Big Four Park...in the re-gentrifying downtown of sleepy Jeffersonville, Indiana...Abbey Road on the River featured dozens on bands playing on 5 or 6 stages over an (official) 5-day period.

"Official," I say, because while the scheduled performances began before noon on Thursday May 24 and didn't end till 10 pm Monday May Memorial Day 28, truly committed Beatle fans (like our own Paul "FF909" Overly and Olivia Anne "Oliva Anne" Morris Fuchs) - and the tireless Joey the C - started gathering with the faithful as early as last Tuesday.

I understand the socializing among Abbey Roaders and the bands is part of the point of the event, the same kind of extended family reunion as Gretsch Roundups, with impromptu late-night sets and singalongs and no doubt slumber-party all-night rap sessions.

But, you know. I'm essentially asocial. Too many people gathered in one place mess with my brainwaves.

From its early incarnation 17 years ago as a Beatles-only event, Abbey Road on the River has morphed slightly to major in the music of the last half of the sixties (and maybe a year or two into the seventies) with a heavy concentration in Beatle studies.

Which is to say, it treats the Beatles reasonably enough as the core of the pop music of that period, but casts its nets wide enough to take in the musical environment the Beatles both helped create and reacted to. And that makes for a satisfying smorgasbord of increasingly historical (and historic) music, brought to life for your listening, dancing, and rememberin' pleasure.

I yield to no one in my admiration for the Beatles, and the back half of the 60s certainly encoded my musical DNA, so such a fest should be a feast for me. And so it might be...except that it involves a list of things I increasingly can't tolerate:

• driving (basically, I prefer not to go anywhere, anytime, for any reason). An easy 90 minutes through the verdant rolling green of southern Indiana is as nice as driving gets, but it's still driving...
• hot, humid weather (the only thing worse is hot, dry weather), almost guaranteed for Memorial Day along the Ohio
• direct sunlight (by nature I'm a cave-dwelling albino mutant and too much sunlight literally makes me ill)
• crowds (the roiling psychic turmoil cranks me up and wears me down)
• sonic chaos (one audible band: good if the band is good; several audible bands: bad no matter how good they are).

All of which is my excuse for not having made more of this opportunity, despite the event being in my figurative backyard - my roundabout way of admitting I only made the scene on Sunday. Twas all I thought my fragile constitution would bear. (Even under the best of conditions, five 10-hour days of multiple stages of ANY kind of music seems more Woodstock than Woodstock, and more stimulus and excitement than the human frame is built for.)

Thus Cheryl and I drafted our handyman John (an exuberant music lover) and pointed Quest the Wondervan toward Louisville, arriving a bit after noon.

What follows in the way of belated reporting can't be a comprehensive overview of this pan-phantasmagorical rocking roll circus of a love fest - just some highlights I most enjoyed.

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Whatever else it is, ARotR is certainly all about the Beatles.

My understanding is that in the ARotR community, and among aficionados of such things, Beatle tribute bands which dress the part are called "boots and suits."

Boots-and-suiters either specialize in particular Beatle eras or offer suited sets of music drawn from those eras. Thus you get the early (commercial) Beatles in the original suits doing the music of 1963-64, Shea Stadium Beatles doing the music of 1964-65, Sgt Peppers' Beatles dressed in the satin band uniforms of the album cover and playing the music the Beatles themselves never played live - and occasionally a rooftop Beatles doing the January 1969 set.

(If I had to choose a boots-n-suits era, it would be Sgt Peppers. Not only do I have a particular affinity for that music, but the suits are lighter weight. I would not want to do shag-coated rooftop Beatles when the temperature and the humidity both hover in the mid-90s.)

But the intrepid boot-suited boys of Abbey Road's summer don the handsome black formalwear the early Beatles wore so well, heat be damned. Ah youth! Ah stamina!

While I'm on the topic of Beatle sub-specialties, there are also bands who don't try to look the part, and simply play the material - usually faithfully, because after all the records themselves are our primary source, it's all right there, and it's become at least a monastic if not an academic discipline to play it right. But sometimes, too, bands offer their own unique interpretations.

And there are solo performers who channel individual Beatles, even from specific very short periods of Beatletime (or post-Beatle history). At least one Wilbury band and two Wings bands were in attendance, and multiple Johns, Pauls, and Georges.

What I've never seen is a Hamburg/Cavern black-leather Beatle set. From a Gretsch-centric perspective, it would be good to hear the black Jet get a good and thorough thrashing - and it would serve to remind us what a fine, relentless live rock & roll covers band the Beatles were. Without those deeply planted and authentic roots, the band could never have evolved later as it did.

So that's my request: Hamburg Cavern Beatles! (Dry-ice smoke machines could produce the atmospheric cigarette smoke not even tobacco-land Louisville permits in public.)


All these bands (from around the world) take the music very seriously, and listening to a series of them play pretty much the same songs becomes an exercise in increasingly detailed critiques of individual technique, tone, equipment, looks, posture, mannerisms, and overall effect. It's possible there can be too much of a good thing: any one of the 48 acts at ARotR would slay you with their Beatles set (and many make a good part of a living at it back home), and seeing too many of them back-to-back seems a little unfair to each of them.

Certainly some are "better" than others, but they all pretty much nail the parts, and differ mostly in detail (or in their mood and the luck or vibe of an individual performance). This wears me out - so much nuance to absorb - but I have to say the core ARotR crowd seems never to tire of those songs, played in that way. It brings the music to life not only for those who remember, but those who never got to hear it live at volume in the day - and several generations who weren't even born when the Beatles broke up. It wasn't only old people swaying along happily and mouthing the words, it was enthusiastic youngsters (mostly female - some things never change) taking it all in, having memorized every detail.

(Except for the one 20-something long-haired guy who went bareback all day to exploit the magnificence of the huge tattooed portrait of the Beatles on his back, and the BeaTle T-roof logo on his chest.)


To serve as a single image of a classic Beatle Boots-n-Suits band, herewith Rubber Soul (I hope that ID is correct), noteworthy for their youth, energy, boyish waistlines, command of their early-mid Beatles material, vocal finesse, and sense of madcap moptop Fab-4 fun they demonstrated during their set. (Which I watched from up close, under the shade of the stage roof, with Paul Overly, the two of us noticing minor details of performance and execution.) The band's George is exceptionally engaging.

It's probably worth mentioning that, while of course the "right" guitars and amps are exhaustively well known, not all players (from choice or economy) brandish Gretschs, Rickenbackers, and Epiphones - nor were Vox amps prevalent (the provided backlines being Fender). Rubber Soul demonstrated that Beatle music can be played just fine on other instruments.

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Meanwhile, back at Gretsch Central...

As an event sponsor, Gretsch got a shady tented pavilion under the long arching ramp from Big 4 Park up to the old highway bridge which has been refurbished as the Ohio River pedestrian bridge.

Here Joe manned the ramparts for the long duration of the event - arriving Tuesday to unpack his road cases of gear, set up the display, attend to the guitars and T-shirt sales, and generally be the friendly face of Gretsch. (And he didn't leave till the following Tuesday.)


The Brothers Cardooch

Joe's older brother Bernie coincidentally lives in Jeffersonville, where he is a world-renowned academic, and spent a couple days with Joe at the booth.


It's all we have left!

When the event started, the display racks were full. By Sunday, with two full days left, all had been sold right off the rack but these two Electromatics. They sold during the day on Sunday, leaving Joe with nothing but T-shirts to sell on Monday!


Full Service

Joe goes nowhere without a fairly complete set of tools for setup and repair, and he spent several hours each day working on performers' guitars: string changes, setups, emergency repairs, whatever it took to keep the music going. He even glued and clamped a bridge on an acoustic.

And it didn't have to be Gretsch instruments.

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Abbey Road: It's More than the Beatles

In fact, one of the year's standout acts, Classicstone, offered tribute sets to Queen and Pink Floyd - and Saturday night's headline acts on the biggest stage were America and Vanilla Fudge.

I suppose in this context, it's necessary to point out that it was the actual goin'-to-the-desert America, not a tribute - and three of the four original members of Vanilla Fudge. I regret having missed that show; Joe reports that Mark Stein brought his B3 and Leslie cabinets and let forth with the full roar of that beast, that Vinnie Martell nailed the wiry psychedelic leads, and that all voices were in fine shape for the dramatic tremulous harmonies of the Fudge's classic pre-prog dirges.


But we did catch Magic Bus's Sunday afternoon set, and it was, so to speak, a trip.

From the schedule posted on the band's website, I'm guessing they're from Michigan (not too long a haul for their VM microbus, restored to vintage hippie splendor).

Their set opened with "Magical Mystery Tour," and (despite the obvious cues in their garb) I thought we might be in for a set of '67-'68 Beatles - but they quickly made it clear the bus's magic tour had arrived in San Francisco, 1967. And that's pretty much where we stayed - though we time-traveled as far as 1970.

With seven full-on hippie freaks onstage, there was plenty of instrumental and vocal firepower to properly present the music of that time and place in something like the appropriate size and splendor. I heard DNA-familiar music as loud and bold as intended, as it must have been at the time. I had the 45s and the LPs in my youth, you understand, and did all I could with my little "portable stereo" - and I heard cover bands of the day do some of this material. I covered some of it myself. But, other than Janis (my first concert), I never saw any of these bands live.

Magic Bus did it right, bringing it all to life - like all I'd heard before were vague echoes from two valleys away, and now I was front-and-center in Golden Gate Park. With so many players, it's tough to single out individuals - suffice to say everyone did his/her job with the perfect balance of precision and abandon. Lead guitar (the guy on the left with the non-period-correct Music Man Albert Lee model) was noteworthy for his command of a crazy range of period-correct tones, as were keyboards and bass - and the female singer (sorry, there were no introductions and no names are provided at the website) pretty much nailed Grace, Janis, and Joni.

The set included (among other songs) "White Rabbit," "Somebody to Love," "Incense and Peppermints" (yeah!), "Spirit in the Sky," an extended and thoroughly satisfying and true-to-life jam on "Magic Carpet Ride," "Me and Bobby McGee," Youngblood's "Get Together," "Woodstock," "Mama Told Me Not to Come," "No Time," and closed out on a reprise of "Magical Mystery Tour."

That's timeless music (for some of us), and Magic Bus recreated the era with the right (if perhaps a bit overdone) look and spirit. There were so many of them onstage it looked like a commune, and by the end of the set we all had a contact high.

Note the Ampeg bass amp in this pic - possibly half a modern SVT? In any case, this seems to have been the provided backline amp for the event, and man, is it great to hear an Ampeg in full-on glory, or WHAT? There's nothing like a Beatles-based event to bring out great bass players playing great basslines - and nothing like a Hofner Beatle bass to lay down the fundamental thunder. We heard a lot of that, all day long, and it was great!

And look! A Gretsch!

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(As always, I wish you could see these pics at something like the size I intend. Some of them are worth blowing up, just for the color and detail.)

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Shut Up and Drive

... is the name of this "classic rock" band from Cincinnati, and if ever a band was appropriately named!

SUAD got to "warm up" Stage #1 ahead of Sunday night's headline presentation of the entire "Love" soundtrack, and John and I took seats near the front mostly to stake our claim for the Rilly Big Shew, not so much for SUAD. But these guys more than warmed up the stage, they owned it, and I'm glad we had those seats.

These are obviously guys of a certain age, and they're up there with absolutely no pretense or drama. Trio with a singer out front - remind you of anything? Well yeah - and their entire set consisted of two or three Who songs and a whole slew of Led Zeppelin (none later than 1971). And they just plain delivered. The band features Paul Bromwell on lead guitar and vocals, Kevin Canafax on lead vocals, Rocky Lockard on Bass and Mark Tipton on drums - every one of whom did his job with power, authority, restraint, and pure class.

We can probably agree that Zeppelin vocals are no walk in the proverbial park, but Canafax just opened his mouth and out it soared. No theatrics, no drama, no self-congratulation - just the real thing. Samelike Zeppelin guitar - it's not the highest-technique stuff in the world, but it takes command and a touch, and Bromwell delivered, every time. (Including the breakdown in "Heartbreaker" and bowed guitar in "Whole Lotta" and "Dazed and Confused" (their set-ender). So there's the top half of the battle cruiser in full armor - but the rhythm section of Lockard and Tipton propelled the juggernaut with spectacular precision and controlled energy.

Here are four guys who I'd bet I have played together for decades, with an inside knowledge of their material only long experience can bring to maturity - and it all showed.

And is it just me, or does Kevin Canafax look an AWful lot like TV Jones, or what?

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All You Need is LOVE...

a live performance of George Martin's brilliant remix of Beatles material for the Cirque du Soleil Vegas show.

The soundtrack is replete with crossfades between Beatles tunes of different eras, verses and choruses from different songs thrown together - sometimes over the instrumental bed of another song - sound effects taken out of context, and a modern version of the studio trickery Martin pioneered with the Beatles.

To present it live is a monster challenge: you need most of an orchestra, several complete sets of Beatles with full command of the whole range of the band's material (for crossfades and superimpositions), and tight timing under a music director's supervision. Abbey Road's presentation also used the Jumbotron to intersperse Beatle film footage with live shots of the stage - and amazingly got the Beatles onscreen to lip synch with the performers.

To make it all happen, strings and brass from the Louisville Symphony were joined by the members of three ARotR bands - All You Need is Love, Brit Beat, and The Newbees. Players cycled on and off-stage as the music required, while the core rhythm section and orchestral instruments stayed put. I didn't bother counting, but there were probably 30 musicians onstage in the most grandiose moments.

The show began, though - pretty promptly at 8:30 - with short spiels from the mayor of Jeffersonville (who's happy to have ARotR back in his town for the second year, and looks forward to many years of happy partnership), a representative of WAVE3, the local media station who sponsored, and finally ARotR festival originator and organizer Larry Jacob.

Jacob cast the entire weekend in the shadow of the momentous upheavals of "50 years ago today," the year of assassinations and unrest that was 1968 - offering up the Beatles' emphasis on the tired clichés of peace, love, and understanding as an antidote not only to the troubles of that time, but of our own.

And before Love, the Soundtrack proper got underway, the assembled multitude provided a long moment of reflection with a performance of ARotR regular keyboardist and arranger Kevin Ashba's gorgeous arrangement of "Abraham, Martin, and John," with orchestral strings, harp, and Kevin's own rich vocal.

And then it was time to make Love itself, about which there could be so much to say it's almost pointless to say anything. It spans not only all the Beatles' career, the remarkable variety and evolution of their music - but somehow what it meant in that time, and what it's come to mean to us 50 years later. It does all this with nothing but the music of the Beatles - arranged in novel juxtapositions and rearrangements that make it all fresh and mysterious again.

Along the way, all three bands demonstrate their command of the music of their areas of Beatle specialization (Brit Beat for early Beatles, AYNIL and Newbees for the later period). The highlight of highlights for me is always hearing 1967-1970 Beatles material performed at full live volume with orchestral instruments as required.

"I Am The Walrus" is simply spectacular in this context, with the crowd shouting along and pumping fists in the air on the "whoo!"s and everyone gleefully goo-goo-ga-joobing, proving once and for all that cellos rock. "Penny Lane" (with correct piccolo trumpet, of course!) and "Day In the Life" (with full orchestral freakout and that stupendous final E-major) were also about all you could hope for in terms of iconic vinyl come to life.

And loud! Becoming increasingly sensitive to the long-term viability of my ears, I frequently whipped out the dbMeter Pro app on the iPhone. Most of the day, at most stages, volume topped out at a majestic but temporarily tolerable 100 dB. At its peak - during Love's set-ending, all-hands-on-deck, possibly-not-entirely-appropriate jam to "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" - the meter hit 110. That's loud.

And "Gently Weeps" is a bit of a misnomer. While in fact the full-band freakout version was preceded by a quiet acoustic version based on Harrison's demo for the song, there was nothing at all gentle about the full-shred apocalypse which included not only 3 electric guitars not-at-all-gently screaming - but a Duesenberg Fairytale lap steel, a big honkin' bari sax, the aforementioned piccolo trumpet, and pretty much everything else three massed bands and part of an orchestra could put up on the front of the stage.

All at once.

After which anything else would have been an anti-climax (had I been able to hear it).

The last band of the night, Classicstone, is supposed to have been one of the highlights of the show, but it took over an hour for a sound crew which had seemingly exhausted its competence during Love to get the stage ready - and after several perfectly executed Classicstone renditions of orchestral-era Beatles which we'd already heard - we left.

And that's all I know about Abbey Road on the River, 2018 edition.


Brit Beat getting sensitive.

All You Need Is Love's Andy providing his ever-dramatic interpretation of a Beatles lyric, always bringing the magic.

... when we really know all you need is a Gretsch!

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The message of the weekend? Give it a chance.

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Good review. I might have to go one of these years.

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How does the new venue compare with the prior one in Louisville?

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How does the new venue compare with the prior one in Louisville?

– Ric12string

Not to steal FF909's thunder but "it is an impossible venue for live music on 5 stages." The bleed was horrible the first year. After a year to fix it, it was so much worse this year that the bands on 2 of the stages lost 15 minutes of stage time each, all day, every day after the first day because they could not be onstage at the same time due to the bleed. Since we're here among friends, succinctly put, I hate it. But, Louisville's venue was perfect. So, the comparison to the "other side of the River" is a very rough one. I could go on and on, but the promoter wants us to love the new spot and if he reads this he'll ban me. So, I'll stop. But, as I said, I could go on and on and on and on.

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Not to steal FF909's thunder but "it is an impossible venue for live music on 5 stages." The bleed was horrible the first year. After a year to fix it, it was so much worse this year that the bands on 2 of the stages lost 15 minutes of stage time each, all day, every day after the first day because they could not be onstage at the same time due to the bleed. Since we're here among friends, succinctly put, I hate it. But, Louisville's venue was perfect. So, the comparison to the "other side of the River" is a very rough one. I could go on and on, but the promoter wants us to love the new spot and if he reads this he'll ban me. So, I'll stop. But, as I said, I could go on and on and on and on.

– Olivia Anne

I wondered if that might be the case. Indeed, the old venue in Louisville was ideal.

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In a limited space, there are only three approaches to abating the noise from stages being used simultaneously: build ridiculously expensive and unlikely noise barriers (ain't hapnin'); move the stages further apart (limited room); enforce a lower-volume standard.

Much below 95dB and your monumental rock band starts to sound like supper club entertainment. It's just hard to contain that kind of volume. Put a rock band on the street at 100dB, and you KNOW you can hear them from blocks away. Big Four Park doesn't have blocks of separation.

To me the event would make more sense with half the number of acts, on three stages, over three days. I can imagine it's exhausting as is, even for the faithful.

I thought the atmosphere of the venue was more pleasant overall than across the River, partly because it was more concentrated in a park-like area, not spread over several properties. Of course it felt more like an outing in a local park than a Big Festival, but that was OK by me. And I remember walking the grounds of the Louisville venue and hearing "Daytripper" being played by three bands at the same time on different stages - so it's not like that site had perfect noise isolation.

Still, the noise crosstalk is definitely an issue if your aim is to really enjoy the music and not simply be overwhelmed by the Beatle excess of the event - which brings me back to fewer stages, further apart. (That may be heresy, however.)

In at least one regard the Louisville site was unquestionably better: an inside. A grand (air-conditioned) hotel ballroom, as well as smaller banquet and meeting rooms accommodated any kind of gathering in comfort. It probably doesn't hurt to acknowledge that some former residents of the sixties are now in their sixties - and older - and may not thrive under hot muggy noisy festival conditions, reserved seating on plastic chairs in the sun or self-toted lawn chairs notwithstanding.

In any case, it's not my problem to solve - and I'd hate to leave the impression that these issues seriously marred what is a unique event, and the best opportunity I know of to hear all that great music in a few hours (or a few days). Well worth attending, in any form.

One MAJOR flaw for me, however, was that despite a period of rain mid-afternoon (which did cool things down a bit, and brought some shade)...not a single band played "Rain," which with "Walrus" (and 30 others) is my favorite Beatle song.

I suspect John would have taken a Rainy eastern attitude toward the venues: here or there, it's still everywhere.

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I’m unwilling to let my 3 hours work on these posts disappear over the topic-aging horizon so quickly, so I’m bald-facedly bumping my own thread.

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I mean, come on...doesn’t anyone else think the singer in Shut Up and Drive looks like TV Jones?

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Yes he does. Very cool and great coverage.

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Thank you Tim. I'm so glad you came . . . It won't be the same . . . When you and Cheryl don't come. Please make a repeat. And, just one time come to the all night singalong. You'll adore it: lots of PEOPLE, By a muggy swimming pool, wildly great singing, and some really great strumming. Just your style. NOT.

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Whatever else it is, ARotR is certainly all about the Beatles.

My understanding is that in the ARotR community, and among aficionados of such things, Beatle tribute bands which dress the part are called "boots and suits."

Boots-and-suiters either specialize in particular Beatle eras or offer suited sets of music drawn from those eras. Thus you get the early (commercial) Beatles in the original suits doing the music of 1963-64, Shea Stadium Beatles doing the music of 1964-65, Sgt Peppers' Beatles dressed in the satin band uniforms of the album cover and playing the music the Beatles themselves never played live - and occasionally a rooftop Beatles doing the January 1969 set.

(If I had to choose a boots-n-suits era, it would be Sgt Peppers. Not only do I have a particular affinity for that music, but the suits are lighter weight. I would not want to do shag-coated rooftop Beatles when the temperature and the humidity both hover in the mid-90s.)

But the intrepid boot-suited boys of Abbey Road's summer don the handsome black formalwear the early Beatles wore so well, heat be damned. Ah youth! Ah stamina!

While I'm on the topic of Beatle sub-specialties, there are also bands who don't try to look the part, and simply play the material - usually faithfully, because after all the records themselves are our primary source, it's all right there, and it's become at least a monastic if not an academic discipline to play it right. But sometimes, too, bands offer their own unique interpretations.

And there are solo performers who channel individual Beatles, even from specific very short periods of Beatletime (or post-Beatle history). At least one Wilbury band and two Wings bands were in attendance, and multiple Johns, Pauls, and Georges.

What I've never seen is a Hamburg/Cavern black-leather Beatle set. From a Gretsch-centric perspective, it would be good to hear the black Jet get a good and thorough thrashing - and it would serve to remind us what a fine, relentless live rock & roll covers band the Beatles were. Without those deeply planted and authentic roots, the band could never have evolved later as it did.

So that's my request: Hamburg Cavern Beatles! (Dry-ice smoke machines could produce the atmospheric cigarette smoke not even tobacco-land Louisville permits in public.)


All these bands (from around the world) take the music very seriously, and listening to a series of them play pretty much the same songs becomes an exercise in increasingly detailed critiques of individual technique, tone, equipment, looks, posture, mannerisms, and overall effect. It's possible there can be too much of a good thing: any one of the 48 acts at ARotR would slay you with their Beatles set (and many make a good part of a living at it back home), and seeing too many of them back-to-back seems a little unfair to each of them.

Certainly some are "better" than others, but they all pretty much nail the parts, and differ mostly in detail (or in their mood and the luck or vibe of an individual performance). This wears me out - so much nuance to absorb - but I have to say the core ARotR crowd seems never to tire of those songs, played in that way. It brings the music to life not only for those who remember, but those who never got to hear it live at volume in the day - and several generations who weren't even born when the Beatles broke up. It wasn't only old people swaying along happily and mouthing the words, it was enthusiastic youngsters (mostly female - some things never change) taking it all in, having memorized every detail.

(Except for the one 20-something long-haired guy who went bareback all day to exploit the magnificence of the huge tattooed portrait of the Beatles on his back, and the BeaTle T-roof logo on his chest.)


To serve as a single image of a classic Beatle Boots-n-Suits band, herewith Rubber Soul (I hope that ID is correct), noteworthy for their youth, energy, boyish waistlines, command of their early-mid Beatles material, vocal finesse, and sense of madcap moptop Fab-4 fun they demonstrated during their set. (Which I watched from up close, under the shade of the stage roof, with Paul Overly, the two of us noticing minor details of performance and execution.) The band's George is exceptionally engaging.

It's probably worth mentioning that, while of course the "right" guitars and amps are exhaustively well known, not all players (from choice or economy) brandish Gretschs, Rickenbackers, and Epiphones - nor were Vox amps prevalent (the provided backlines being Fender). Rubber Soul demonstrated that Beatle music can be played just fine on other instruments.

– Proteus

Thank you guys so much! We were (and are still) so happy to be part of this festival!!! We usually use Gretsch instruments here in Brazil, but the cost to bring them with us was too expensive. Maybe next year! We love so much Gretsch instruments and they are essential to get those Fab Four sound. Thank you so much for the kind words about Rubber Soul Beatles! We appreciate it!

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Gustavo, glad to see you here on the Gretsch Pages. Indeed I enjoyed the band, and thank you for making the long trip to the festival.

I'll look forward to seeing you again.

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Your band is divine & the photo with Gavin excellent. We Love You, Yeah, Yeah, Yeah, Yeahhhhh.


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