The Workbench

Truarc VS Rocking Bar

1

Hello, I just got a new Anni 6118.she has the pinned rocking bar bridge Great guitar. My question is, Is a Truarc a needed upgrade? Any advice is very much needed and helpful, as well as appreciated. Also which one do I want? Thanks Mark

2

Tru-ARc makes a rocking bar for use with the Bigsby.

3

With a pinned bridge, I would get a Tru-Arc Serpintune. Ask Tim. He knows.

4

Thanks, and I do know this subject has been beaten to a pulp

5

I have a 6118 with a Serpentune. It is a great setup.I highly recommend it.

6

While it might not be strictly NEEDED, a Tru-Arc bridge can provide tonal enhancements, depending on the tone you're after and what material bridge you choose. Each one (brass, copper, stainless, aluminum, glass) has different tonal properties. Proteus can advise you on which one would best suit the sound you're looking for.

The other reason for going Tru-Arc would be if the radius mismatch between the standard rocking bar bridge and your particular fingerboard bothers you. If it doesn't, then the tonal differences are what it's all about.

7

Does make me wonder about the current Gretsch bar bridges : are the still as bad as the were a while ago, radius-wise, or did Gretsch finally adress that?

8

Does the “rocking” mean is rocks back and forth, or its a rock and roll thing?

9

It tips slightly, more than actually "rocking." Bigsby use doesn't provide enough string travel to really create rocking. (Other than the rock & roll kind.) The bridge is designed to tip freely enough to travel with the strings (they do NOT "slide" over the bridge), and then tip back to a consistent resting point.

10

The short answer is: If your guitar stays in tune and the action doesn't bother you, you don't need to do anything.

The long answer is: If your guitar has really light strings (0.008"- 0.009" e-string) with a plain g-string you don't need to do anything.

If your guitar has medium light strings (0.010"- 0.011" e-string) with a plain g-string you might need a Tru-Arc Serpentune.

If your guitar has medium light strings (0.010"- 0.011" e-string) with a wound g-string you don't need to do anything.

If your guitar has medium strings (0.012"- 0.013" e-string) with a plain g-string you do need a Tru-Arc Serpentune.

If your guitar has medium strings (0.012"- 0.013" e-string) with a wound g-string you might need a Tru-Arc Serpentune.

An even longer answer:

String up with your favorite strings. Remove the bridge pins. Tune your bridge into place to the strings with the largest cores. With plain g-strings, this will be the E-string (6) and the g-string (3). With wound g-strings, this will be the E-string (6) and the b-string (2). Try your guitar for awhile, If it stays in tune easily, pin down the bridge at this location and live happily ever after. If not talk to Tim Harmon about a Serpentune bridge.

Lee

11

Besides radius match and intonation, Tru-Arcs (as mentioned) also allow you to tune the tone of your guitar beyond the stock plated brass option. Aluminum, copper, stainless, and titanium each has its own characteristic tone and dynamic response.

Tone-tweaking is at least part of the rationale for probably 2/3 of our business - and the sole reason for a great number of buyers as well.

12

I'm inclined to say that get your string quest straight first, then the bridge after that. I like solid bridges. The Gretsch bar bridges take care of many situations. Tim Harmon's Tru-Arc and Serpentune bridges pretty much cover the rest.

As for material, go brass fist, after all, you bought a Gretsch.

Lee


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