General tech questions

Solid State vs. Tube for Electric Bass

1

I've been getting my Bill Wyman on here, enjoying the new Bass.

How might I expect "clipping" at low frequencies on my Solid State set-up?

The Electric Bass is making much fuller use of the Power than any of my Electric Guitars. Much louder....might be a peculiarity of the Low Impedance pickup?

Just dialed everything full on the LR Baggs Para DI including Gain...what a House Rocker!

When will I blow everything up?

I built about a 20% Safety Factor into the Amp Head, and the C15N Speaker is sized just so to test being Overdriven.

That Low E note, 41hz?, is a curious thing...

2

I'm not sure what you're asking here.

What sort of bass are you using?

What sort of amp?

Bass amps want a lot more power than guitar amps as it sounds like you might already know.

I imagine your speaker will go first

Are you trying to overdrive the amp??

3

I'm just hoping for comments from folks who have experience with both SS and Tube.

My SS is 50W, a ChipAmp with nice specs, been using it now for close to a decade. It's just a Power Amp, and with it I have the LR Baggs.

What is surprising is how loud it is. The notion that an Electric Bass would need more Power seems backwards compared to when I use an Electric Guitar in the same set-up.

Odd observation I guess. But, I haven't heard "clipping" like on a Stereo HiFi. I would think Bass notes would clip sooner than Higher notes? I have heard what I think to be clipping with my Adamas A-E...but, only when I add too much Gain. In that case, it may be the Pre-Amp saturating, too, not the ChipAmp.

As I play the Bass more, it seems a great match.

I think it is the Low Impedance pickup...it is an Epi Jack Casady Bass.

It may also be the confined space and longer wavelengths...

4

Solid state is great for bass, especially if you're after a very clean tone at all volumes up TO the point where clipping occurs. Its deficiency (if it is one), is that when it DOES clip, it's a much uglier sound than when tubes do so progressively, and more harmonically.

With solid state, it's sudden, harsh, and very much more like something's wrong. Rather than a smooth contribution to the tone, SS clipping destroys the tone. When you get there (if you do get there before popping a speaker), you'll know it. I doubt if you'll like it.

5

It'll be interesting when I can get some time in a larger space...

6

Solid state is great for bass, especially if you're after a very clean tone at all volumes up TO the point where clipping occurs. Its deficiency (if it is one), is that when it DOES clip, it's a much uglier sound than when tubes do so progressively, and more harmonically.

With solid state, it's sudden, harsh, and very much more like something's wrong. Rather than a smooth contribution to the tone, SS clipping destroys the tone. When you get there (if you do get there before popping a speaker), you'll know it. I doubt if you'll like it.

– Proteus

There's nothing quite like the "distinct tone" of PNP square-wave clipping, particularly in the 40-200hz range... eh Tim?

brown-note city.

7

I'm just surprised it isn't clipping...it is the Texas Instruments/National LM3886 chip in a well-filtered circuit, then with a toroidal transformer.

I like this same Amp/LRBaggs set-up when I play slide on the StratPlus with Lace Sensors.

That's when I would expect it, but I haven't yet tested full gain and volume.

The chip does have some level of built-in oversaturation protection...I'm using a 4 ohm load.

http://www.ti.com/product/L...


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