General tech questions

Shure vs Nady Wireless

1

Anybody got any opinions on Nady vs Shure wireless for guitars? I've got a 90's era Nady 1001 unit that I've never used and broke it out for rehearsal the other day (in a really large space).

Since this really old unit isn't going to have the fancy channel switching, etc, that the new ones do I'm curious what your thoughts are between the two brands (or other?) before I pop for another one.

Spare me your "wireless is horrible, direct to amp with a cable and no effects" rhetoric, I realize this is not exactly the wireless crowd here.

2

I'm interested in this too. My primary reason is that my practice space is small and the cord spaghetti that happens with the microphones, PA patch cords, bass cords and pedal patch cords, plus the power cords gets old quickly.

I see older wireless systems on craigslist frequently and often wonder if it is the easy button.

3

I’ve been using an old Shure T4 / T1 combo for years with no issues. My sax players have been using Samsung AR1 / AH1/35X set. No experience with Nady.

Most new units are digital that I’m not egar to try.

4

@fistpicker - agreed, that tangle is actually mostly what I was trying to avoid. Worth it.

@Charile - thanks - I have a Shure lavalier mic that I use for other purposes. I'm happy with it, but it doesn't run the same level of abuse that I think my guitar one will. Good to know the Shure stuff lasts.

5

I have a Shure for my rig and I love it, never had an issue with it. One thing that bothered me being a left handed guitarist is that the input cable on my pedalboard is on the right hand side. Made for a constant dance of stepping over/ around the guitar cable.

6

I've worked with wireless on a large scale for decades. Get the Shure.

7

I've used a few different brands over the years and I've never been happier than I am now with the Xvive U2. It's small, easy, USB rechargeable and sounds NO DIFFERENT to a cable.

I recorded a take directly into a Line 6 then into Audio Logic X, then replaced the cable with the U5 and took another take, then I put some random edits in to switch between the cable and the wireless - you really can't tell.

It's digital and has approx 6ms lag, but don't let that put you off, you don't notice it. If it worries you remember this; sound travels at approximately 1000ft per second (give or take), so you only need to stand 6ft away from your amp and you're experiencing the sound with a 6ms delay. The time it takes for the sound to get from your amp to your ears is a much bigger issue when going wireless, especially when you're 50ft or more from the amp.

8

I've tested various wireless systems (all price ranges) over the years, and the thing that has kept me from getting one is the latency. I'm not a shredder by any means, but it's bugged the hell out of me when I've been in the other (read: mixer) end of a medium sized venue, and the notes I've been playing come a fraction of a second too late. Using a lo-o-o-o-o-o-ng guitar cable, with the same distance to the stage, the latency has been "in sync" with the rest of the band (distance related), while the wireless systems have given me an extra level of latency.

So I'm sticking with cable. Although wireless would've been really convenient on occasion.

Anders

9

Radio waves travel at the speed of light, about 186,000 miles per second. Just how long a cable are you using that you can tell the difference between that and a radio pack?

Even if the delay you’re hearing is one millisecond (which is inperceiveable to the human ear) you’d still have to be 186 miles away...

Digital systems have AD/DA converters and whatnot so there will always be a latency, but radio is to all intents and purposes instantaneous. The lag you hear is just the sound getting from the stage to your ears.

10

Radio waves travel at the speed of light, about 186,000 miles per second. Just how long a cable are you using that you can tell the difference between that and a radio pack?

Even if the delay you’re hearing is one millisecond (which is inperceiveable to the human ear) you’d still have to be 186 miles away...

Digital systems have AD/DA converters and whatnot so there will always be a latency, but radio is to all intents and purposes instantaneous. The lag you hear is just the sound getting from the stage to your ears.

– Deke Martin

I dunno, Deke - I never tested a digital one. But I stand by my experience as far as latency goes. Maybe the systems I tried were crappy ones (Shure, AKG, Mipro...).

I used to work in a music store, so I had the opportunity to bring stuff to gigs for "road-testing". As I said, I'm no shredder, but the thing I played as a test was the Rock Around The Clock-solo. I can't remember what system I tried this one time, but we had a gig at a big ballroom at an Oslo hotel. The sound guy was standing 20 - 25 meters from the stage, and when I was standing next to him, I actually had to play in front of the beat to be in sync with the band. Plus, the guitar sound was horrible. Once I used my 20 meter guitar cable instead, things fell back in place. At least we were in sync.

Of course, this was more than ten years ago (probably closer to fifteen), so things may have changed a bit, LOL

Anders

11

20-25 meters(?) You’d have the exact same latency if you were directly cabled. I know this because many years ago before I had a wireless I would run my guitar thru the PA snake so I could play out by the mixer to hear the band in sound check.

I’m still using 20 year old Shure analog wireless technology and I can tell you there is no sound degradation. Your non-true-bypass pedals alter your sound more.

12

20-25 meters(?) You’d have the exact same latency if you were directly cabled. I know this because many years ago before I had a wireless I would run my guitar thru the PA snake so I could play out by the mixer to hear the band in sound check.

I’m still using 20 year old Shure analog wireless technology and I can tell you there is no sound degradation. Your non-true-bypass pedals alter your sound more.

– Charlie Vegas

I trust my ears. I'm telling ya, the difference between standing 20 meters away from the stage with a wireless vs. with a cable was very easily recognizable. And it wasn't just me, the sound engineer and our singer said the same thing without me asking. Again, it could be that the systems I tested were no good. But I tried different brands and several price ranges.

FWIW, I don't use a 20 meter guitar cable. That was my soundcheck cable. And my pedals all have true bypass ;)

Five or six years ago, the government closed a whole bunch of the frequencies designated for wireless systems, and since I'm not in the business anymore, I haven't paid much attention to the wireless technology recently. A friend of mine has a Line6 Relay system, and he claims it's great. But I'm sticking with cable.

13

I’ll second the Xvive.

My only gripe is whenever people are using their phones (which happens all the time) I get a slight stuttering signal. Think it like a tremolo pedal in the fastest setting.

14

What are these "meters" you speak of? My American brain hates math.

Just kidding - all good input, I appreciate it.

15

I had a Nady wireless. Sound quality was fine. The whole idea was that I could walk through the entire room to check the sound. But just like gretchoholic I experienced that delay.

16

The further you get from your amp the more delay, cabled or wireless.

Radio waves (coming from a wireless) travel at the speed of light 299,792,458 metres per second. That’s not the source of the delay. The speed of sound (coming from your amp) is relatively slow in comparison at 331.2 meters per second.

So standing just 15 meters (50 feet) from your amp you would have a 45 millisecond delay even if you were cabled.


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