General tech questions

Sanding a neck

1

Not on a Gretsch, but on a Gibson 335. I think I'd like to do it more. I wouldn't mind if I took it right down to seeing some wood. I'd be interested to hear how long it took you, and if it was just the blue Scotch Brite pad.

Funny that I have glossy neck Gretschs, but they've never felt sticky. Only on the 335.

2

I bought the blue ones,, I did not do anything. I had to use a green one. Probably all done in less than 10 mins. Out of all the guitars I had,, The Gretsch seems to be the worst! But I probably will do it tonight, due to that big fact. I'm not getting rid of the guitar and the experience with the other guitars. After so many years, I never thought of this!

3

The way I think I have seen this done more often is to work through several grades of steel wool, like woodworking. Glad to hear the Scotch Brite Pad caused no ill effect or green streaks.

You would need to mask off the pickups, they will attract the metal bits coming off...

4

I have a guitar that came to me used with a sanded neck. It made a lot less difference than I thought it would - to the point where I can't see bothering to sand any other guitar.

On the other hand, besides guitar, my other hobby is aikido, a Japanese martial art that incorporates wooden sword and staff techniques. The high end traditional weapons are oil rubbed, but modern production stuff is urethane finished. I can't stand the feel of the urethane. It's like it's simultaneously slippery and sticky whenever you least want it to be. I ended up sanding and oiling all my own stuff rather than using the dojo's equipment. The movements are a lot bigger, and your hands get a lot sweatier in martial arts than playing guitar, but I can understand why it might matter to some players.

5

The way I think I have seen this done more often is to work through several grades of steel wool, like woodworking. Glad to hear the Scotch Brite Pad caused no ill effect or green streaks.

You would need to mask off the pickups, they will attract the metal bits coming off...

– Twangmeisternyc

I am talking about the back of the neck.

6

Yes, that I understand.

I have done the steel wool treatment on several guitar neck backs, but none recently.

Lots of pool cues, too!

7

I used 8/0 steel wool to smooth out the gloppy poly finish on a first generation Terada 6120 neck. What a difference. I liked the look of it so much that I did it to the rest of the guitar. What a difference. Instead of a tacky shine I got a very warm satin glow that set of the beautiful quilted grain. Tape off your pickups as bits of the steel wool will get into poles and won't want to come out.

8

If you use 3m 3000 and 5000 Trizact sp?, you can leave it in the case and you don't have to worry 'bout metal fragments.

9

If you use 3m 3000 and 5000 Trizact sp?, you can leave it in the case and you don't have to worry 'bout metal fragments.

– Curt Wilson

Curt, I'm assuming that this will work well on poly finished and laquer necks?

10

Curt, I'm assuming that this will work well on poly finished and laquer necks?

– J(ust an old Cowboy)D

Yep, works great on any finish.

11

Yep, works great on any finish.

– Curt Wilson

Thank you Curt. I've got one Gretsch that I love everything about, except the feel of the poly neck.

I'll have to try this out.

Many thanks.

JD

12

I have a "kitty" of the fine sandpapers for whatever guitar herd need that arises, sourced or produced by Klingspor, from a German manufacturer.

600, 800, 1200 silica carbide on wet/dry paper.

Then I have a couple unmarked sheets that are white, feel like thin plastic... 3M?, ... like 1500 or 2000? I have the data sheet somewhere...

Those are like using a piece of white tight printer paper, you barely see (if) anything happen! Like a polishing cloth...

13

Only guitar I have ever owned that the back of the neck was sticky was a Gibson SG....the finish was soft also; you could make an impression in it with your fingernail. My guess is that SG may have been rushed out of the factory before the lacquer was fully dry. I presently have a made in Japan ESP/Edwards Les Paul copy with a real gloss Nitrocellulose Lacquer finish that's hard as a rock and back of the neck has a very slick feel. I will say that my son has an Ernie Ball Music Man bass that has a satin "oil and wax" finished neck that feels amazing; just a real nice organic feel to it that almost molds to your hand.

14

This is something I do on every guitar I've bought on the first string change.Tape the back off sorta 'stinger' style at the headstock and at the heal and with 3000 3M..lightly ,then with just a few light wipes(not a rub) with 0000 steel wool.Super slick and no stick every time.


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