The Workbench

NDPD

1

New (old) drill press day. Picked up this Craftsman 15” press, built in the late 40’s by Atlas. 150 lbs of cast iron that works like it was built yesterday. Very smooth operator. Larger than most bench top presses, it could easily be converted to a floor mount with a taller post.

3

Very nice. My drill press is pretty much my only power tool. Pro tip: they're not just for drilling! I use mine for myriad tasks - drilling, milling, grinding, sawing, buffing, etc. One of these days, I'm going to use it for digit removal. Just not sure when that's going to happen.

4

Very nice. My drill press is pretty much my only power tool. Pro tip: they're not just for drilling! I use mine for myriad tasks - drilling, milling, grinding, sawing, buffing, etc. One of these days, I'm going to use it for digit removal. Just not sure when that's going to happen.

– Afire

Here’s a Pro tip: collect a small army of these and set each one up for a specific task. I have two on the floor and two on the bench. I have one set up just to stake turrets when I build my circuit boards.

5

The Rockwell was my grandfathers and the Walker Turner has the slow speed pulley setup. The Delta 10” bandsaw is a real sweetie. Smaller than my 14” bandsaw, it’s still made of cast iron.

6

For CVA cab making ?

– DCBirdMan

I mostly use the Walker Turner for drilling and fabricating chassis. The Rockwell gets a lot of use drilling and countersinking the support rails in the cabinets.

7

This new Craftsman was just so clean I couldn’t resist. Notice the complete lack of an “arc of shame”.

9

Our theater shops had Deltas. A drill press is a very useful power tool for myriad purposes.

10

That thing looks serious. Congrats

11

Here’s mine. Montgomery Wards branded but with a Kenmore electric motor. Runs like a Swiss watch.

12

Wow, my comment was intended to be tongue in cheek. I thought my multi-purpose use of my drill press was somewhere between irresponsible and absurd. I guess I'm not alone.

13

It’s much more sane to multitask a tool. Unfortunately I‘m pretty compulsive. But to be fair, I only paid $50 for the Craftsman which is less than an oscillating drum sander attachment.

15

Nice. I recently scrapped a floor version of that Craftsman press. Motor needed to be rewound, needed to be re-wired, inter alia. I didn’t have the time or inclination to add that project to my list. Kept the heavy base and table, which now supports my bench grinder.

16

Nice. I recently scrapped a floor version of that Craftsman press. Motor needed to be rewound, needed to be re-wired, inter alia. I didn’t have the time or inclination to add that project to my list. Kept the heavy base and table, which now supports my bench grinder.

– Zigracer

You can always find another motor. It's a lot like swapping pickups.

17

When I inherited my grandfathers machines (drill press, jointer, table saw, 24” scroll saw) they all had Sears washing machine motors. Looking thru old tool catalogs, it’s clear that machines didn’t come with a motor. You had to pay extra. Gramps used whatever he could get his hands on.

18

This new Craftsman was just so clean I couldn’t resist. Notice the complete lack of an “arc of shame”.

– Powdog

"Arc of shame"?

Is that what happens when the user forgets to clamp the table in place, & a drill bit wanders across it?

19

I prefer a bench mounted drill press over a stand alone. It gives you the freedom to use your bench tops, on both sides of the drill press. I have an old Atlas table mounted drill press, that I'll never trade in. I picked it up for $50, about 20 years ago, at a garage sale. I use it for all kinds of things, not just drilling. These things make great rivet presses, and anything else you need a press for. I've even used mine as a punch. I've chucked grinding wheels and sanding drums as well.

20

Here's one of mine. Unused for a while but still works when assembled. 12 speed.

21

I have 8 or 10 extra motors. I have to look and see how many work. A couple may be early Edison or Tesla made. I'm pretty sure those two are frozen.

22

It’s more a series of holes created by drilling thru the material into the table top. As the years go by and the table position moves it creates an arc of holes. It’s cast iron but the bits are much harder.

23

Yeah that a nice one. Good price too.

I got this old craftsman for $15. It was part of a bundle of equipment that I purchased from a widow of a local luthier who passed away.

RIP Morris Johnson

24

Yeah that a nice one. Good price too.

I got this old craftsman for $15. It was part of a bundle of equipment that I purchased from a widow of a local luthier who passed away.

RIP Morris Johnson

– Setzer

Those King Seeleys are so cool. I’ve passed on a few cause I didn’t need one at the time, but wish I had.

25

I remember family drives through Reno as a kid on our way to visit family in Colorado, and my dad pointing out all the people standing with blank expressions in front of slot machines, repetitively pulling the handles over and over. My dad commented that most of them would go home with less money than they came with, but that if they got jobs as Drill Press Operators, they could do the exact same thing and be guaranteed to make money every day.


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