General tech questions

Eb

1

My band has been tuning to 432hz for some time now. I notice it helps my voice hit some higher notes. This morning I tuned my main guitars ; Jag Tan Annie and White Penguin to Eb and damit I love the feel of Eb!
Anyone play in Eb? I know it’s pretty common. I think the guitars not only play easier, but have also come to life from a tonal perspective. Both seem much more “open” and just sing. I’m gonna give it a try. My hands enjoy the lower tension on the strings.

2

I have all of my guitars except for one setup and tuned to Eb. I love it. The one that is tuned to standard is the one I use to learn songs by ear.

3

I go the other way with my acoustic quite often. I will tune it to 444. It just seems to sound better.

4

Hendrix, Stevie Ray, Slash...loads of music you know were tuned to Eb. Look at this list.

5

My band does. Took them years to convince me...glad they did.

6

I was in one band that did that years ago, but never again. If you can't sing high enough, how about learning to play in E flat & A flat. It'll force you to come up with more orginal parts.

7

I was in one band that did that years ago, but never again. If you can't sing high enough, how about learning to play in E flat & A flat. It'll force you to come up with more orginal parts.

– Billy Zoom

More than anything my hands like the lower string tension. I don’t have an issue playing in different keys. I think capos are the devil.

8

More than anything my hands like the lower string tension. I don’t have an issue playing in different keys. I think capos are the devil.

– Hipbone

Lighter strings? Seems an easier solution and way easier to play with other people?

9

It could make it easier to play with horns (Bb or Eb)

10

I once was asked "why don't you use any alternate tunings?" I replied "when I learn everything there is to know in standard tuning I will" I'm glad I'm not that stubborn anymore.

11

I had a very good time, once upon a time, tuning a Carvin DC-150 down an OCtave - with the regular 10-46 strings.

THAT had some low string tension. I could bend strings clear off the neck. And, as you'd expect, it played kinda funny. BUT, with concentration and a very light touch, it was possible to play it in tune. I used it on a recording, both clean and dirty, and it had a sound you couldn't really get any other way. Not with a pitch shifter (not that I have anything against them, but when they just transpose the overtone series down an octave they don't sound "natural"), and not with a 6-string bass.

I'll probably do it again someday. Great entertainment.

12

The band I was recently in tuned down a half-step. We were a cover band that played a lot of Beatles and as well as other harmony-laden vocal groups of that era, so it did help with hitting certain notes.

It's a nice tool to have in one's kit, but I'm not sold on it enough make it a permanent thing or do my orginals in it.

13

Exactly! If you're doing covers of English bands, it can be helpful. Americans jast can't sing as high as the Brits. As far as horns go, I've played sax in enough guitar bands to be most comfortable in E, A, & C.

14

What was that thread a while back...something about a Whole-step Flat, Capo-ing up one?

It puts all the dots in the wrong spots....Ha!

15

What was that thread a while back...something about a Whole-step Flat, Capo-ing up one?

It puts all the dots in the wrong spots....Ha!

– Twangmeisternyc

Yes, and I think I commented on that thread. Later I was looking through a Robert Johnson TAB book and remembered the thread. The OP didn't mention it but I would not be surprised if that's where his dilemma began.

It seems RJ tuned down a half step for standard and then certain strings up and down for alternate tuning and capoed up to cover a couple extra keys. For example When You Got A Good Friend says "tune down 1/2 step, capo II" and another tune says "open A tuned down 1/2 step".

Our bass player is an excellent clarinet and sax player (and pianist!). He says he has no problem playing in any key.

16

when i detune i prefer going all the way down to D. it really changes the timbre and string feel. that's not really practical if you're doing covers, though, because if you're sticking close to the original and you get farther away from the original key it starts to sound weird. that degree of downtuning works better on acoustic because the strings are heavier. it's especially cool with the low string dropped to C which makes it boom like crazy.


Register Sign in to join the conversation