The Workbench

1960 Country Gentleman Fretboard Replacement.

1

I post these so people can see the guts, some like guts and others don't. Personally I'm ambivalent, some guts are better than others and so are shells.

I'm not looking for thumbs, arrows, numbers or any of those things, just sharing guts as previously stated. Some pretend not to like guts, they keep their head straight forward but their eyes go hard left...

https://www.oldschoolguitar...

2

I'd like to see a picture of the finished fretboard with new inlays. Takes guts to do that work for sure.

Would be ironic if .... never mind.

3

It's incredible how these turn out.

4

Curt - Would you mind explaining your technique for cutting out the thumbnail shaped routes for the fingerboard inlays.

5

Curt - Would you mind explaining your technique for cutting out the thumbnail shaped routes for the fingerboard inlays.

– Planet_of_the_Heapes

I trace the shape and cut it out with this.

7

Thanks for that Curt I really appreciate seeing a craftsman at work. Well done

Davedee

8

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– Curt Wilson

Curt, I have an old Foredom similar to yours. Do you use graphite to lubricate the flex connector or grease? I've gone online to try and hunt this down and couldn't find the info. Thanx.

9

My eyes went left....

The picture essay is a brutal thrill!

10

I trace the shape and cut it out with this.

– Curt Wilson

Thanks man! That tool is a step up from my B&D Wizard tool

I've been procrastinating about replacing the fingerboard on my 60 Anniversary because I was hesitant about these thumbnail trenches. I guess I should just dive in, the worst outcome is my lost time and a botched piece of rosewood. Thanks again.

11

Curt, I have an old Foredom similar to yours. Do you use graphite to lubricate the flex connector or grease? I've gone online to try and hunt this down and couldn't find the info. Thanx.

– lx

I use graphite, same stuff I use on the TR6 speedometer cable.

13

How do I pin bridges, I'm happy you asked.

This way they're hidden under the wheel and can be easily removed. If that keeps you up at night the head can be cut off, the pin pushed down a little and the void filled with superglue and ebony dust.

14

I did the same to my SSU back in '05 but I placed the pins inside of the posts.

If you don't look for them, they're pretty much invisible

15

Beautiful,i love a happy ending!

16

Lots of times I will use the small Gibson pickup ring screws. I drill 2 holes through the base and counter-sink the top of the hole. Then I'll find out when the position of the bridge should be to so the guitar will intonate and tape off the bridge location. Put the screws into the base after drilling a very small hole into the top of the guitar and then screw it in, add the bridge and string it up. I use Pyramid Strings from Germany. They require about a day to settle in, so I wait until they've been on the guitar, up to pitch before setting the bridge position. That way it'll be pretty accurate as when a set is new it'll be different than when it settles-in.

17

I use the black Gibson pickup ring screws too! Drill a hole just inside the bridge post, mark where the bridge base goes with masking tape, start the screws in the top , remove and get rid of the burr with a larger drill bit, screw the bridge base down lightly - it doesn't have to be super tight - and you're done. If you counter sink the screws they are almost invisible, esp if you use the black ones. FWIW I countersink the bottom of the hole in the base lightly too, to allow for any wood being raised by the screw.

Now that Gretsch pin them at the factory I haven't had to do this for a while.


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