Gretsch Garage Sale

FS: “And now for something completely different…”

1

For sale is my 1994 Patrick Eggle Guitars New York Broadway model electric guitar with Eggle-branded, Hiscox form-fitting hard shell case. A rare bird very infrequently seen or heard in the U.S. and Canada (not to mention in this condition, but there, I mentioned it anyway), this built in the UK, small batch production (i.e., lots of hand work) guitar is a lightweight, professional grade instrument that sports a petite, chambered / "thinline" body, and cops a variety of Gibson, Fender, and Rickenbacker tones.

This 7 lb, Cherry Sunburst finished example is in perfect electronic, mechanical, and playing order, and despite the instrument's vintage, it remains all original and in excellent cosmetic condition with, IMO, only two issues worthy of noting to prospective buyers: there is a lengthy, curving, fine-line scratch on the surface of the finish on the rear of the body (which would not photograph), and small area of mild dulling in the shine of the clear coat on the front of the body beyond the forward tip of the sound hole where a player would rest his or her right forearm (which I also could not capture on camera) -- I suspect both of these defects would buff out to a mirror gloss with a judicious application of fine-cut automotive glazing compound and either good old fashioned elbow grease or a motorized polish pad.

Here are the specs:

Body: Semi Hollow Select Mahogany with acoustic chambers, Rickenbacker-style "slash" soundhole

Top: Figured Maple

Neck: 22 fret Maple bolt-on

Inlays: Pearl Dot Markers

Pickguard: 3-Ply Black / White / Pearloid

Fingerboard: Rosewood, 254 mm (10") radius

Headstock: Natural

Tuners: Sperzel USA non-locking

Bridge: Wilkinson USA GB 100 one-piece bridge with intonatable saddles for G string and B string

Tailpiece: Custom Eggle Trapeze

Pickups: Kent Armstrong designed Sky brand Bridge Humbucking Pickup (HPAO-PE) Kent Armstrong designed Sky brand Neck Humbucking Pickup (HPAN-1)

Controls: Master Volume / Master Tone / Treble Bleed Network (all passive)

Switching: 5-Way, Pickguard-Mounted, Strat-style lever SuperSwitch, with coil taps on both pickups -- position 1 -- bridge humbucker position 2 -- inner coil of bridge humbucker with outer coil of neck humbucker position 3 -- both humbuckers position 4 -- outer coil of bridge humbucker with inner coil of neck humbucker position 5 -- neck humbucker

Scale length: 634 mm (24.96”)

Width of neck at nut: 41.7 mm at 12th fret: 50.3 mm

Depth of neck at 1st fret: 20 mm at 12th fret: 21.7 mm

String spacing at nut: 35 mm at bridge: 52.5 mm

Action as supplied from factory at 12th fret treble: 1.8 mm at 12th fret bass: 2.0 mm

Here's are excerpts of a rave review from the same model year as mine (NOTE: review example equipped with different humbucking neck pickup)...

Source: The Guitar Magazine (12/94) Author: Dave Burrluck

The New York originally appeared in 1992, its roots more Rickenbacker than the PRS/Gibson mould of its cousin, the Berlin. As the new design boss at Eggle, Gary Levinson, explains: “We’ve lengthened the body, pulled the waist back a little and made the lower bouts a little more rounded. The traditional outline was a little squat looking to me, I wanted something that would flow a little more.” Even so, the guitar is still compact at barely 37” long. The Broadway is a thinline semi-solid; the mahogany body routed from the top on the bass side of centre before it’s sealed, baring the slash soundhole, by a maple ‘lid’ of about 8 mm thick. This creates an overall thickness of 48 mm. There are no body contours, only a medium edge radius but it’s not an uncomfortable guitar by any means. Played seated the lower triangular horn is a good leg rest and combined with the more rounded upper horn gives excellent top, 22nd fret access.

All previous New Yorks have been solid so why go to a thinline now? “There’s very few on the market” says Levinson “and for me it gives a slightly more rounded tone. I didn’t want to go too far, I still wanted a guitar that you could stand close to your amp or monitor and get a nice creamy, bluesy tone without it going nuts and feeding back uncontrollably.”

The one-piece maple bolt-on neck joins the body adjacent to the 21st fret. It features a well carved heel and a tongue that extends under the neck pickup. It’s held in place with four countersunk screws though on the production model the lower two will be replaced with ‘T’ bolts that’ll locate into metal inserts in the neck itself for added rigidity. “The neck now sits lower into the body” adds Gary “and we’ve made the body ¼” (6.35 mm) thicker to allow for that. I always felt the neck stuck out too far; it just didn’t feel right from a playing point of view”.

In width, the neck has been broadened slightly though big-handed players may still find things a little tight in the upper fret positions. With a good oval (not too chunky) shaping and a satin finish the neck plays really well. Fretting (from 2.5 mm high x 1.9 mm wide) is exemplary; there’s plenty of height but not too much bulk and they’re well rounded too. The frets sit on the 10” (254 mm) radiused rosewood board, adorned simply with pearl dot inlays on the face and side.

The non-locking satin Sperzel heads are laid out to give a straight-in-a-line string pull over the mycarta nut, the slight headstock back angle ensuring a clean open-string ring. The trapeze tailpiece adds a good retro touch and like the ‘tone-o-matic’ bridge is made by Trevor Wilkinson. The bridge itself features a non-adjustable ridge for pre-set intonation with the exception of a small movable and lockable B and G string ridge; certainly easier to adjust than on the combined bridge/tailpiece due to the lesser back-angle over the bridge. Overall intonation is set via the two grub screws at the back of the bridge which locate onto the height adjustable posts; the two grub screws at the front lock the bridge firmly in position once intonation is set.

In keeping with its retro vibe the Broadway features a chrome covered Seymour Duncan ‘Seymourised’ mini humbucker, mounted on the small pearloid scratchplate along with the 5-way selector switch [...] The bridge humbucker -- a Kent Armstrong Sky HPAO-PE model -- is mounted in a chromed plastic ring. The master volume (with treble-bleed cap) and tone control with Tele-style knurled knobs mount from the rear while the jack is side mounted on an oval chromed metal plate.

The wiring on a 5-pole switch maximises the pickup’s potential in a straightforward fashion. Position 1 gives you bridge humbucker; position 2, inner coil of the bridge humbucker with the outer coil of the neck humbucker; position 3, both humbuckers; position 4, outer coil of the bridge humbucker with inner coil of the neck humbucker; position 5, neck humbucker.

Sounds If you’re expecting a big round woody tone then you’re on the wrong wicket with the Broadway. While it may well sound slightly rounder and softer than the other New York solids the voicing here -- especially on the bridge pickup -- is quite toppy and, in certain instances, a little hard [...] Position 2 captures a good single-coil mix handy for both cleaner Hendrixy rhythm fills or a rawer-edged older blues distortion. Because of the clarity and percussion the twin humbucker mix works well; full-bodied yet with a jangly edge. It’s only position 4 that sounds a little too thin for a comfortable Fender-type mix though with some gain added, it captures quite a wiry and tortured blues solo voice [...] However I would conclude that the semi-solid nature and the trapeze tailpiece give the guitar a slightly rounder, seemingly more resonant voice than than you’d get from the equivalent solid-bodied version with a standard wrapover bridge. To my ears, it gives a quite textured sounding solid-body tone worthy of the Fender camp, but with a power that will happily aid country blues or even hi-gain grunge styles. Ergonomically it also happens to be a great on-stage, high energy rock rhythm guitar with some pretty energetic sounds to match.

The Verdict Eggle’s Broadway builds on the fun, funky New York design, the slight alterations certainly welcome on both the visual and playability side. It’s been a crucial year for Blade-Eggle but from what I’ve recently seen, this guitar included, they are at last building guitars that match their glossy marketing.


And here are some pix...

To sum up, this super versatile li'l beauty -- which is also a beast -- holds tuning stable while covering sounds from LP roar to twangy Tele to sparkly Strat to Ric jangle, is easy to tote and extremely playable. If you're a fan of the early Ernie Ball MusicMan Axis Sport guitars, this compact, resonant package will feel very familiar, and does everything those could -- but doesn't need a battery to do it! Also? The dark green, well-padded HSC holds the guitar very snugly and feels like its exterior could withstand a mortar bombardment.

SOLD. Thanks to all for looking!

2

Well THAT's a mighty thorough listing!

Interesting guitar. I wasn't aware of it. In the domain of learning something every day, thanks for the thorough, pleasant, and painless lesson.

3

Eggle make amazing guitars, think of it along the lines of a UK PRS and you are getting close.

4

For sale is my 1994 Patrick Eggle Guitars New York Broadway model electric guitar with Eggle-branded, Hiscox form-fitting hard shell case. A rare bird very infrequently seen or heard in the U.S. and Canada (not to mention in this condition, but there, I mentioned it anyway), this built in the UK, small batch production (i.e., lots of hand work) guitar is a lightweight, professional grade instrument that sports a petite, chambered / "thinline" body, and cops a variety of Gibson, Fender, and Rickenbacker tones.

This 7 lb, Cherry Sunburst finished example is in perfect electronic, mechanical, and playing order, and despite the instrument's vintage, it remains all original and in excellent cosmetic condition with, IMO, only two issues worthy of noting to prospective buyers: there is a lengthy, curving, fine-line scratch on the surface of the finish on the rear of the body (which would not photograph), and small area of mild dulling in the shine of the clear coat on the front of the body beyond the forward tip of the sound hole where a player would rest his or her right forearm (which I also could not capture on camera) -- I suspect both of these defects would buff out to a mirror gloss with a judicious application of fine-cut automotive glazing compound and either good old fashioned elbow grease or a motorized polish pad.

Here are the specs:

Body: Semi Hollow Select Mahogany with acoustic chambers, Rickenbacker-style "slash" soundhole

Top: Figured Maple

Neck: 22 fret Maple bolt-on

Inlays: Pearl Dot Markers

Pickguard: 3-Ply Black / White / Pearloid

Fingerboard: Rosewood, 254 mm (10") radius

Headstock: Natural

Tuners: Sperzel USA non-locking

Bridge: Wilkinson USA GB 100 one-piece bridge with intonatable saddles for G string and B string

Tailpiece: Custom Eggle Trapeze

Pickups: Kent Armstrong designed Sky brand Bridge Humbucking Pickup (HPAO-PE) Kent Armstrong designed Sky brand Neck Humbucking Pickup (HPAN-1)

Controls: Master Volume / Master Tone / Treble Bleed Network (all passive)

Switching: 5-Way, Pickguard-Mounted, Strat-style lever SuperSwitch, with coil taps on both pickups -- position 1 -- bridge humbucker position 2 -- inner coil of bridge humbucker with outer coil of neck humbucker position 3 -- both humbuckers position 4 -- outer coil of bridge humbucker with inner coil of neck humbucker position 5 -- neck humbucker

Scale length: 634 mm (24.96”)

Width of neck at nut: 41.7 mm at 12th fret: 50.3 mm

Depth of neck at 1st fret: 20 mm at 12th fret: 21.7 mm

String spacing at nut: 35 mm at bridge: 52.5 mm

Action as supplied from factory at 12th fret treble: 1.8 mm at 12th fret bass: 2.0 mm

Here's are excerpts of a rave review from the same model year as mine (NOTE: review example equipped with different humbucking neck pickup)...

Source: The Guitar Magazine (12/94) Author: Dave Burrluck

The New York originally appeared in 1992, its roots more Rickenbacker than the PRS/Gibson mould of its cousin, the Berlin. As the new design boss at Eggle, Gary Levinson, explains: “We’ve lengthened the body, pulled the waist back a little and made the lower bouts a little more rounded. The traditional outline was a little squat looking to me, I wanted something that would flow a little more.” Even so, the guitar is still compact at barely 37” long. The Broadway is a thinline semi-solid; the mahogany body routed from the top on the bass side of centre before it’s sealed, baring the slash soundhole, by a maple ‘lid’ of about 8 mm thick. This creates an overall thickness of 48 mm. There are no body contours, only a medium edge radius but it’s not an uncomfortable guitar by any means. Played seated the lower triangular horn is a good leg rest and combined with the more rounded upper horn gives excellent top, 22nd fret access.

All previous New Yorks have been solid so why go to a thinline now? “There’s very few on the market” says Levinson “and for me it gives a slightly more rounded tone. I didn’t want to go too far, I still wanted a guitar that you could stand close to your amp or monitor and get a nice creamy, bluesy tone without it going nuts and feeding back uncontrollably.”

The one-piece maple bolt-on neck joins the body adjacent to the 21st fret. It features a well carved heel and a tongue that extends under the neck pickup. It’s held in place with four countersunk screws though on the production model the lower two will be replaced with ‘T’ bolts that’ll locate into metal inserts in the neck itself for added rigidity. “The neck now sits lower into the body” adds Gary “and we’ve made the body ¼” (6.35 mm) thicker to allow for that. I always felt the neck stuck out too far; it just didn’t feel right from a playing point of view”.

In width, the neck has been broadened slightly though big-handed players may still find things a little tight in the upper fret positions. With a good oval (not too chunky) shaping and a satin finish the neck plays really well. Fretting (from 2.5 mm high x 1.9 mm wide) is exemplary; there’s plenty of height but not too much bulk and they’re well rounded too. The frets sit on the 10” (254 mm) radiused rosewood board, adorned simply with pearl dot inlays on the face and side.

The non-locking satin Sperzel heads are laid out to give a straight-in-a-line string pull over the mycarta nut, the slight headstock back angle ensuring a clean open-string ring. The trapeze tailpiece adds a good retro touch and like the ‘tone-o-matic’ bridge is made by Trevor Wilkinson. The bridge itself features a non-adjustable ridge for pre-set intonation with the exception of a small movable and lockable B and G string ridge; certainly easier to adjust than on the combined bridge/tailpiece due to the lesser back-angle over the bridge. Overall intonation is set via the two grub screws at the back of the bridge which locate onto the height adjustable posts; the two grub screws at the front lock the bridge firmly in position once intonation is set.

In keeping with its retro vibe the Broadway features a chrome covered Seymour Duncan ‘Seymourised’ mini humbucker, mounted on the small pearloid scratchplate along with the 5-way selector switch [...] The bridge humbucker -- a Kent Armstrong Sky HPAO-PE model -- is mounted in a chromed plastic ring. The master volume (with treble-bleed cap) and tone control with Tele-style knurled knobs mount from the rear while the jack is side mounted on an oval chromed metal plate.

The wiring on a 5-pole switch maximises the pickup’s potential in a straightforward fashion. Position 1 gives you bridge humbucker; position 2, inner coil of the bridge humbucker with the outer coil of the neck humbucker; position 3, both humbuckers; position 4, outer coil of the bridge humbucker with inner coil of the neck humbucker; position 5, neck humbucker.

Sounds If you’re expecting a big round woody tone then you’re on the wrong wicket with the Broadway. While it may well sound slightly rounder and softer than the other New York solids the voicing here -- especially on the bridge pickup -- is quite toppy and, in certain instances, a little hard [...] Position 2 captures a good single-coil mix handy for both cleaner Hendrixy rhythm fills or a rawer-edged older blues distortion. Because of the clarity and percussion the twin humbucker mix works well; full-bodied yet with a jangly edge. It’s only position 4 that sounds a little too thin for a comfortable Fender-type mix though with some gain added, it captures quite a wiry and tortured blues solo voice [...] However I would conclude that the semi-solid nature and the trapeze tailpiece give the guitar a slightly rounder, seemingly more resonant voice than than you’d get from the equivalent solid-bodied version with a standard wrapover bridge. To my ears, it gives a quite textured sounding solid-body tone worthy of the Fender camp, but with a power that will happily aid country blues or even hi-gain grunge styles. Ergonomically it also happens to be a great on-stage, high energy rock rhythm guitar with some pretty energetic sounds to match.

The Verdict Eggle’s Broadway builds on the fun, funky New York design, the slight alterations certainly welcome on both the visual and playability side. It’s been a crucial year for Blade-Eggle but from what I’ve recently seen, this guitar included, they are at last building guitars that match their glossy marketing.


And here are some pix...

To sum up, this super versatile li'l beauty -- which is also a beast -- holds tuning stable while covering sounds from LP roar to twangy Tele to sparkly Strat to Ric jangle, is easy to tote and extremely playable. If you're a fan of the early Ernie Ball MusicMan Axis Sport guitars, this compact, resonant package will feel very familiar, and does everything those could -- but doesn't need a battery to do it! Also? The dark green, well-padded HSC holds the guitar very snugly and feels like its exterior could withstand a mortar bombardment.

SOLD. Thanks to all for looking!

– Lacking Talent

Oh man, I wish I had the money - I played an Eggle a couple of years ago at Cream City Music, that was a variation on the doublecut Les Paul Jr. theme, and it was just plain killer both sound and playability-wise, but it was waaaay more than I could afford at the time. Eggles are fantastic guitars.

5

Reminds me of a cross between a Rickenbacker and a Corvette. Like. GLWTS.

6

That is one heck of an interesting guitar!

7

I nominate this listing as "best of" on GDP for 2020. Very informative... well done Sir!

8

I nominate this listing as "best of" on GDP for 2020. Very informative... well done Sir!

– kc_eddie_b

I second the nomination! As a guitar I had never even heard of, I now feel very well informed. Your review/sales pitch is the most thorough I've ever read. If I hadn't just purchased a new Gretsch 6131T, I would be all over this one. The missus, ever so graciously, bought me the Firebird for my 60th birthday, and I can't (as much as I would like to) buy your guitar. Good luck with sale, it's going to make someone a happy picker!


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