Electromatics

brand new g2622 wont stay in tune

1

Ive just bought my first Gretsch g2622 no bigsby and it wont stay in tune, I took it back to the shop and changed it for another one and its exactly the same. Any thoughts / advise.

2

Get new strings. My nephew has one of these (w/ Bigsby) and it plays great and stays in tune.

3

Have a tech do a good setup on it, including dressing the nut.

4

The strings on my guitar are 10-46 gauge do you know if he stayed with the same gauge or not

5

The strings on my guitar are 10-46 gauge do you know if he stayed with the same gauge or not

6

Had one that wouldn’t hold tune, turned out the tuner knobs were loose, a quarter turn on each one solved the problem!

7

9-42, 10-46, 11-50, whatever. The nut needs attention. The nut needs attention on a huge percentage of new guitars.

At the VERY least lift the strings out and grind some #2 pencil lead into the nut slots.

8

My guess is some strings are going flat.

Have the strings been stretched in properly? If not, make sure they are. If it’s wearing the same strings it left the factory with it’s possible (likely) they weren’t fully stretched in.

Are they secured properly at the tuning head? Slippage here could cause that. Make sure they are properly secure with no slippage. The methods for securing strings are as many as there are players - we all have our preferred methods and all SWEAR by them, so I take from this there is in no ‘right’ way - but just make sure they’re secure.

Still going flat? As others have said, check the nut is not binding. If the nut slots aren’t wide enough for the strings being used they will bind and flatten the string after bending (a giveaway for nut binding is when tuning up you may notice you turn the machine for 1/4-1/2 a turn and hear no difference then all of a sudden you hear a PING and suddenly it’s too sharp).

9

I have put some No2 pencil dust into the nut slots, refitted the strings as per the Gretch manual at the head stock end, and stretched the strings manually 3 times and re tuned. I tightened the machine fixing nuts and also the knob fiixing screws I didnt notice any ping noise when tuning but on the 3rd string (G) the tuner scale overshot the target point and i had to have three goes at tuning it. From how my tuner is reacting I suspect the 3 thinner strings are causing the problem which sounds like a nut issue.

I.ll see how it goes today

I found a local guy who does guitar repair and setup and to doe a full set for £35 inc new strings.

10

Viva, I think that it's worth the price of the setup and new strings. New guitars at this price point (and even higher price) often have poorly factory dressed nuts. Also, factory strings can age and oxidize while they are on the guitar before you buy it. One of the first things that I do on a new guitar, at any price point, is to change the factory strings asap. I've had crapy strings on new Gibson and Fender guitars, I think that a lot of it depends on how long they sit around before they're bought. I'm pretty sure a good setup will sort out the tuning issues. Good luck with it, I hope it works out for you.

11

Yep, the overshooting on the tuner suggests strings are binding. The graphite you put in has no doubt helped and lubricated out the audible ‘ping’, but they still sound like they are binding a bit.

Wade makes a good point re oxidised strings. I’m sure it’ll be fine with new strings and a pro set-up.

12

Viva, I'm kind of old school, and a strong advocate for bone nuts. Graphtech, Derlin, and Tusq are just fancy names for plastic. Bone is far denser than plastic, and the strings are able to slide over bone much easier than they can over plastic (a bone nut still needs to be properly dressed). Combining the bone nut with the setup will keep the cost down.

A bone nut has the added advantage of allowing the open strings to ring clearer. A plastic nut absorbs more of the string vibration than bone, because it is softer.

I've made it a habit, to replace plastic nuts with bone, on all my guitars, both electric and acoustic (and the bridge saddle on acoustics). While it is an added expense (around $50US), I've found it to be more than worth it.

I resently bought an expensive Gibson Les Paul, and it had a fancy sounding name for the plastic nut that came on it. I had immediate tuning pings on the G string, and overall tuning problems. $50 later, sporting a new bone nut, and I now have rock solid tuning stability on that guitar. It also made the fretted and open strings more equal in volume and tone.

13

Hi Wade, I have made an appointment to see a tech guy next wednesday I'll post what ever the outcome is when he hopefully resolves the issue.

thanks

14

Hi Wade, I have made an appointment to see a tech guy next wednesday I'll post what ever the outcome is when he hopefully resolves the issue.

thanks

– Viva

Good luck Viva, I'm reasonably sure you will be quite happy with the guitar after your Luthier does the setup. The fellows on this forum have had overwhelmingly good experiences with all of the current Gretsch catalog, Streamliners included. The Streamliners and Electromatics are some of the best valued guitars on the market today. Both lines are made remarkably well regardless of the price. I look forward to reading about your results.

15

Can someone tell me how to Log out of Gretsch Pages

16

Viva, I'm kind of old school, and a strong advocate for bone nuts. Graphtech, Derlin, and Tusq are just fancy names for plastic. Bone is far denser than plastic, and the strings are able to slide over bone much easier than they can over plastic (a bone nut still needs to be properly dressed). Combining the bone nut with the setup will keep the cost down.

A bone nut has the added advantage of allowing the open strings to ring clearer. A plastic nut absorbs more of the string vibration than bone, because it is softer.

I've made it a habit, to replace plastic nuts with bone, on all my guitars, both electric and acoustic (and the bridge saddle on acoustics). While it is an added expense (around $50US), I've found it to be more than worth it.

I resently bought an expensive Gibson Les Paul, and it had a fancy sounding name for the plastic nut that came on it. I had immediate tuning pings on the G string, and overall tuning problems. $50 later, sporting a new bone nut, and I now have rock solid tuning stability on that guitar. It also made the fretted and open strings more equal in volume and tone.

– Wade H

Hear! Hear! Wade. I'm the same old school as yourself. They can give plastic all sorts of fancy names but it's still plastic and as an excellent test comparison I read awhile ago, bone surpassed every type of plastic used for nuts in every category tested. This wasn't just a material to material test either, they used nuts made from all materials and put in guitars and strung up.

The only nut I didn't change out on all my guitars is the one on my '41 Synchro which was bone to begin with.

17

Can someone tell me how to Log out of Gretsch Pages

– Viva

Welcome to Hotel California.

18

Hi Guys its update time. (1) There is nothing wrong with my guitar the problem was me. Here goes:-I was using a polyphonic tuner to tune my g2622 but also if the guitar didnt sound right I was manually tuning as well. (ie tuning the string in question to the one above it).

When you use a digital tuner the strings never touch the fret bars so the pitch of the string was set in its natural state,

When you set the string manually it is pushed down until it touches the fret bars and then on to the fret board. These are two different pitch points for the same string.

19

(2) This was causing me to tune around in circles. Solution don't mix manual and digital tuning as they are not compatible methods. I also had a problem because the strings on my guitar are quite light 10-46 and I was pushing them too hard when playing effectively bending the strings. Solution changed the old strings for a new set DAddario NYLX 11-50 a little more robust than what was on.

Also the serial number of my guitar IS190410350 indicates it was built in Idonesia in April 2019. The strings are at least 18 months old and effectively dull.

Guitar now plays beautifully

20

I love a good ending! Congratulations and enjoy the heck out of it!

21

Right on, Viva! I'm glad you figured it out. I initially tune the open strings with a digital tuner. I then touch up the tuning by playing chords, and making sure they play in tune. The guitar is not a perfect instrument, and needs to be in tune with itself. It takes a good ear and focused attention, and the best we can really hope for is to split the difference (going up the fretboard), and achieve the best possible balance.

22

Hi Guys its update time. (1) There is nothing wrong with my guitar the problem was me. Here goes:-I was using a polyphonic tuner to tune my g2622 but also if the guitar didnt sound right I was manually tuning as well. (ie tuning the string in question to the one above it).

When you use a digital tuner the strings never touch the fret bars so the pitch of the string was set in its natural state,

When you set the string manually it is pushed down until it touches the fret bars and then on to the fret board. These are two different pitch points for the same string.

– Viva

The taller the fret, the more it'll pull the string out of tune when you push down on it. And I push the string till it touches the fingerboard which is why I have the lowest (vintage style) frets on my guitars. I play fingerstyle so there's a lot of combinations of fretted strings and open strings so I need the least amount of the string bending over the fret as it creates dissonance and you hear being out of tune. The string gauge isn't at fault it's the fret height that's the culprit. Can't abide tall frets!

23

Guys, Thank you very much for all your posts they certainly got me thinking

Viva

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