Duane Eddy's House of Twang

DE Signature Six String Bass Guitar at NAMM!!

1

I am so excited to let you all be the first to hear this cool, cool news. Gretsch Guitars will reveal this latest addition to Duane’s arsenal! Thank you for being so supportive of this idea, and hope we see lots of GDP friends at NAMM on Friday, Jan 26, at 1:30.

3

That looks very interesting! What would the difference be between this and a baritone guitar?

4

Walter, Billy? Can ya help a girl out? : )

5

That looks very interesting! What would the difference be between this and a baritone guitar?

– Brian_66

the string gauge and the tuning.

6

Brian, this six-string bass is tuned E to e. A baritone is typically tuned A to a, B to b, or C to c. Usually, the scale length of a six-string bass is longer than a baritone. The baritone is often 30" whereas the six-string bass is usually more like 34".

8

Thanks Ric12string! So would this be similar in concept the the Fender Bass VI? I'm really intrigued by what this guitar will have to sonically offer that makes it unique.

10

Brian, this six-string bass is tuned E to e. A baritone is typically tuned A to a, B to b, or C to c. Usually, the scale length of a six-string bass is longer than a baritone. The baritone is often 30" whereas the six-string bass is usually more like 34".

– Ric12string

No, six string basses, like the original Danelectro, ànd the Fender VI are around 30" scale. That scale works great for baritone tunings as well.

A lot of contemporary baritones are between 27" and 28.5" scale. Works well for baritone tunings, not so great for E-E.

11

Oh, and Deed (and Duane)...that thing is awesome. Super cool. And literally NO one in the world is more deserving than Duane, of course. I wish I could afford one.

12

So esoteric some of this guitar stuff !

13

No, six string basses, like the original Danelectro, ànd the Fender VI are around 30" scale. That scale works great for baritone tunings as well.

A lot of contemporary baritones are between 27" and 28.5" scale. Works well for baritone tunings, not so great for E-E.

– WB

There is, of course, the other kind of six string bass (which has a 34" scale), but it's probably fair to assume we're not talking about those on the Gretschpages.

14

trying to create even more confusion, Otter?

17

I tried to look up "tic-tac bass" on wikipedia and the thing took me to "baritone guitar." What's the real difference/origin of "ti-tac bass" to a regular bass?

18

trying to create even more confusion, Otter?

– WB

If this Duane Eddy model sells in Mexico, does that make it the Bajo Sexto de Senor Duane? :)

20

I tried to look up "tic-tac bass" on wikipedia and the thing took me to "baritone guitar." What's the real difference/origin of "ti-tac bass" to a regular bass?

– lx

Here' s a LOOONG post on the subject I posted years ago on the GDP :

"The Fender Bass VI was really Fender trying to get in that market, that was pretty much "owned" by Danelectro, because they were the only ones that made an instrument like that.

Danelectro introduced the six-string bass in 1956, and it really was a brand new instrument : really a guitar with a 30" scale, tuned an octave below standard guitar.

The guy who probably made the most money playing one, but the least fame because he was largely an anonymous studio musician, was Harold Bradley. He invented what's called "tic tac bass".

In Nashville, bass drums weren't mic'd until probably the early 70's, and double basses were the standard long after the Fender bass had taken over in different kinds of music.

Bradley (and his studio owner/producer brother) found that the typical midrange click they got from having a Dano VI doubling the double bass part, played with a thin pick through a guitar amp, filled a frequency void between double bass and the bass drum, and fortified the rhythm section more on radio at the time than mic'ing a bass drum. (car radio speakers at the time handled the honk of a Dano better than the boom of a bass drum)

Typical Nashville tic-tac bass goes from very subtle (listen to classic country, and more records than you realise have that distinct click, once you start listening for it), to "what is that cool clicking bass thing?!?" ----> Faron Young's "Hello Walls", Elvis "Little Sister", or Roy Orbison's "Working for the man", where it's almost a lead instrument.

People started using them as lead instruments pretty early on too - Duane Eddy recorded a whole album using one, if I'm not mistaken, cool instrumentals with a Danelectro playing the lead. Also, listen to plenty of classic George Jones records for six-string bass solos, and west coast session player René Hall used one for a lot of things too. (listen for Hall on the classic Richie Valens recordings, among lots of other stuff)

A lot of six-string bass ended up on movie soundtracks as well - listen to Mancini's "Shot in the dark" for a six-string bass playing cool counterpoint to a double-bass line.

Some people used Dano - and Fender six string basses as a regular bass guitar too, though most bass players will tell you the 30" scale sixstringers won't "carry" a band like the big thump of a precision bass. But then again, they showed up in both Cream, and The Jimi Hendrix Experience.

When you're playing lead on a six-string bass, you DO have to watch out not to step on the bassplayer's toes, and play differently than you do on guitar - a lot of notes get weird an octave below guitar, you don't get away with as much!

This probably led to people putting lighter strings on the 30" scale six-stringers, and tuning them to C, B, or A, and creating what's now called "baritone guitar" in the process : same instrument, different (lighter) string gauges and tuning.

Slightly easier to play "guitary" things on, to bend notes, and not as much risk of pissing of the bassplayer or sounding like a rabid brontosaurus gone wild. A little bit of a pain too though, because you're transposing all the time.

And even more recently a lot of manufacterers have started producing instruments with a 27" to 28" scale, specifically for baritone tunings, or "low metal tunings", as heavy metal gets heavier and more tuned down by the month. "

22

Thanks, Walter! You should consider posting that to Wikipedia, because they have nothing that explains the "tic-tac" term like you do.

23

a rabid brontosaurus gone wild

That phrase has been stuck in my head since the first time I read that story, probably 15 years ago

24

I know I'll take a little heat for this, and I'm willing, but I typically refer to the Bass VI as a baritone.

The reason I do this is to avoid the confusion of a six-string bass with a Bass VI. The six string bass being the one bass players would use (the regular four strings with the addition of a B string below the E and a C string above the G. Tuned in all fourths) and the one a guitarist would use (tuned E to e, with the major 3rd on the second string - just like a guitar, but an octave lower).

25

I am very happy to see this guitar finally come to fruition. Now I have to try to figure out how to afford one.

Congratulations, Duane.


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