Drums

Is this a good deal?

1

Looking at drums, I never realized how expensive they can be. My daughter was playing around with a friends kit tonight and she really enjoyed it and showed some promise so I'm thinking about putting something together. What do you think for starters?

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Gr...

2

That's OK for the shells, but you're going to need hardware and cymbals.

Best to explore craigslist.

I've got two great sets, one 1964 vintage Slingerland black oyster, and the other, a Tama something or other -Star set. Both with full sets of hardware and cymbals for about $400 each.

3

When buying a big item like a drum set,you gotta factor in the Shipping Fees which in this case is almost $200.

I sold a old Tama Swingstar set recently 5 drums, good Remo Pinstripes heads with hardware , Hi Hat stand and 1 cymbal stand with a ZBT Zildjian. All for $100. They had been collecting dust in a corner of my garage and I basically gave them away. I listed them on Facebook Marketplace and a young man called and was very eager and enthusiastic to learn, so I threw in the cymbal.

There are many Drum sets out there with very little use on them for cheap. Like Crowbone said, check Craigslist,,, also Facebook Marketplace, Letgo, and believe it or not Goodwill.com like this ,https://www.shopgoodwill.com/Item/45136402

Try to buy a complete set with hardware and cymbals. Most guys will sell you a complete set of decent quality Brand Drums for around 3 to 4 Hundred dollars. An older set ,Pearl,Tama, Ludwig will have a little better quality than a new set as everything now is made in China,most old stuff was made in Japan. Cymbals you buy cheaply will usually be Junk but they will do until you figure out that any high quality cymbal will set you back a couple hundred $.

4

Ha! Using the kid as an excuse to buy gear?
I should have thought of that when mine were young.

5

I was going to chime in but everything I would suggest is already been said. I’ll second that motion for checking out craigslist.

6

Personal preference--I don't like those beer can bass drums as in the reference ebay listing. I prefer the more traditional depth (14''). There are plenty of Catalina, etc etc etc, kits in more standard rock or jazz sizes.

7

Ha! Using the kid as an excuse to buy gear?
I should have thought of that when mine were young.

– NJBob

I thought that's what kids were for. That and mowing the lawn.

8

Gretsch Catalina are good quality drums that produce a very good sound. They are better than what their price suggests.

9

A year ago there was a rebate available on a Yamaha electronic drum pad, until the day I was going to go get it. I've waited a year hoping the rebate would come back, but now I've lost my motivation for it.

I like the idea of drums you can turn off...down, but maybe they are better suited as practice aids or additional kit.

10

Thanks all! Now I know that I can get a decent kit for less than the price of a new Electromatic. Groovy, because I really, I mean my daughter really wants drums.

11

A year ago there was a rebate available on a Yamaha electronic drum pad, until the day I was going to go get it. I've waited a year hoping the rebate would come back, but now I've lost my motivation for it.

I like the idea of drums you can turn off...down, but maybe they are better suited as practice aids or additional kit.

– hammerhands

"How do you deal with overly loud drummers?"

"Mike 'em and turn 'em down."

I've dealt with electronic drums a few times. The best sounding setup was when the drummer used a real snare drum and cymbals instead of the electronic versions. Dealing with pit/stage orchestras, drum shields helped a lot, but even then, there was a lot of bleed thru to the other mikes on stage. At least with electronic drums, it was far easier to mike them and blend them in with the rest of the band/orchestra.

12

We bought our kids a drum set and thought we would go out of our minds. As stated above, there’s no volume control. However, it’s a worthwhile pursuit for kids. Keep them interested in it UncleGrumpy!

13

blend them in with the rest of the band/orchestra.

Blend them in? Drums blend?


For all that I'm rhythm-challenged and about as grooveless as a pasty white boy can be, I really love drums. When I'm working up a song, I'm more likely to be making drum mouth noises than thinking of a bass line.

And I'm fortunate-spoiled to have rarely had to work with bad drummers (just often enough to teach me how difficult it is for a musical enterprise to overcome that liability). Samtubwompus and my son Nate are two of the four finest-kind drummers I've been lucky enough to work with over long periods of time.

Troublesomely (for me), I almost don't consider most musical projects complete - or, worse, even well-started - without competently recorded organically-played acoustic drums dead-center in the arrangement. This hobbles most of my recording projects from the git-go (one among several excuses for my low productivity, the others including gear mania and online rabbit holes), because it's rarely convenient and often a logistical nightmare unto impossibility to get a favored drummer, his well-miked kit, myself (and ideally a bassist) in a recording environment at the same time, with time enough to devote to the project.

So I should play to a click track or drum machine or canned loops, I know, and beg a drummer to overdub later. Send' em the files, let them track'em at their convenience. I know. It's the modern way. How else will I ever discharge my monstrous backlog of material, all the stuff I hope I don't die before recording, as though it was a purpose in life?

I don't know. Except that it's just not the same. For me, something much more like music happens when the bones of a song are built by several people playing TOGETHER, at the same time. With all the difficulties and time expenditure acoustic drums impose on that process (transport, space, tuning, rattles, mics, volume), they're still irreplaceable. It's so worth it. It's like it's not a song till it's been blessed by a good drummer behind a good kit.

(The drummer himself - a good one - is never among the problems. They're among the most intuitive, responsive, complete musicians I know.)

I say all this just to commiserate about the joys and challenges associated with a kid's first drum set, and why it's well worth it to go forward and luxuriate in the trouble and the din. I remember getting my brother Steve's and son Nate's first kits as well as I remember any of my guitars. Both, coincidentally, were gray pearloid 60s Ludwigs with indifferent cymbals, about 30 years apart. Steve's were 75.00 - he still has them; Nate's were 150.00 - likewise. I remember the rooms in the houses where we went to get them.

Nate's came at a time in his life when he really needed something to pour himself into, an outlet for energy, a focus, a groove. Like your daughter, John, he showed an immediate spark of interest when he saw and sat behind them, and aptitude when he whacked'em. Drums became a guiding force (for good) in his life, and shaped it. Best money I ever spent.

Playing with him for 25 years has greatly improved my rhythmic sense and musical instincts, and it's a pleasure to be so instinctively locked with another musician.

Paradise for me would be living at a compound (or in local proximity) with a great drummer (Nate andor Sam'll do, thanks) and a bassist, with a recording studio set up and ready to track, drum set tuned, mic'ed, and tweaked, and nothing for anyone to do but record.

Get the drums, revel in the noise, and go for the ride. The family that plays together...plays together.

14

I know there's a lot of pros and cons about electronic vs. traditional drums. But unless you have a soundproof room for your child/beginner drummer to learn in , electronic is the way to go. My daughter learned on a Hart Dynamics set and Roland Module.

15

Yes, Tim,You have been blessed to be in the presence of great drummers. Sam and Nate are both stellar!


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