Billy Zoom's Jet Set

Aspen Pittman…RIP.

26

It's short for reverberation. REEverb was an affectation that caught on when Country Rock was getting big and people were also saying GEEtar.

27

It must be a regional thing. I don't think I've ever heard anyone pronounce it re-VERB, unless they were trying to affect sophistication - either to appear so, or to mock both the hoity and the toity.

It's been REverb among my mentors, peers, friends, and enemies for as long as I can remember having heard the word. Years before country rock was a thing.

In this neck of the woods, we also use kleenexes and drink pop.

But even among us hillbillies, "geetar" has only ever been used to mock the speech of hypothetical folks who were hillbillier and more ignernt than we were/are (if there were any).

"Gitfiddle" is even mockier. I don't know anyone who ever used either word without surrounding them with a palpable cloud of ironic quotation. Because, like, there are cartoon stereotype movie hillbillies invented and perpetuated by self-appointed sophisticates on the coasts, and there are real actual hillbillies - and they aren't the same thing.

Even during the outlaw mechanical bull-ridin' heyday of belligerent, self-aggrandizing Country Rock, when 90% of the bands in the area played both kinds of music, country AND rock, I never heard a soul say "geetar" seriously. (Maybe, while waiting for a bandmate to tune, a guy I knew might get on the mic and say with a lisp, mocking both hillbilliers and the otherly oriented, "Thay, Luther, when yew git that geetar in tune, kin ya waild it?" And there wasn't even a Luther in the band!)

Anyway, no GEEtar. Just REverb. Always REverb.

And can you really blame us? Leo Fender didn't know the difference between tremolo and vibrato, and those are whole different words, with long-established different definitions. That confused us for decades. What does a "mis"placed syllabic emphasis matter?

Did anyone, anywhere, ever say "Twin ReVERB"? I don't think I've ever heard it.

28

The word Reverb predates it's use in guitar amps. It was recording & radio station lingo, and was always pronounced like the beginning of reverberation, which is what it is. We drank pop too, but we pronouced reverb correctly.

29

Yes, we always have & still do say Twin reeVERB.

32

We know you're always right, Billy.

We refused to have a language Academy a la France to insist on One Correct Pronunciations (in a land of dozens of dialects and regional differences) because we had you.

Thank you for your diligence.

Now, if you can work on the niceties of punctuation in "its" and "it's," the pedantic English teacher in me will be satisfied.

33

It's short for reverberation. REEverb was an affectation that caught on when Country Rock was getting big and people were also saying GEEtar.

– Billy Zoom

Or git TAR.

36

Don't you have to Verb first before you can REverb?

What about REcord? REpent? REvenge?

37

The word Reverb predates it's use in guitar amps.

Here, Cap'n! Contraction for "it is" rather than the irregular possessive.

38

The word Reverb predates it's use in guitar amps.

Here, Cap'n! Contraction for "it is" rather than the irregular possessive.

– Proteus

The penguins taught us that the apostrophe represents missing letters---it's=it is; you're=you are, etc.

39

And in the British Isles it' s reCORD, rePENT, reVENGE and yes, reVERB but please don't get confused by the DEtails.

41

Here’s a vid clip of Aspen referring to reVERB at 2:04.


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