The Bass-ment

Squier Bronco Bass (Torino Red)

51

for a Can album i particularly like Future Days; my favorite Neu! album is the first.

53

Tangerine Dream is the largest in my pc library. It has 71 albums in it! And I Love Love Love sour kraut and corned beef on toasted dark rye bread with swiss cheese! I think I might have some german heritage in me. (my last name is Heyl)

54

probably the most influential track from that era of german bands

neu-hallogallo

it was the start of style labeled "motorik" ie. driving beat music

if u don't get it, put it on next time you're driving 65+ on an open road

Link...

cheers

55

Optical Race was the catalyst for my TD collection.

56

I am part German but really dislike Sour Kraut but Krautrock is okay.

-- Echosonic

i agree...:D

58
Amon Duul II. starting out as a commune group with all and sundry plunking bongos, they split off (thus the "II") into a cross between Hawkwind, Wagner, *After Bathing At Baxter's* and a bomb going off. i highly recommend the *Yeti* album. -- macphisto

My classic Guitar teacher Ulrich Leopold was the original Bass Player for Amon Düül II :D !#$@%

59

Mac is right about the far-reaching influence of the Krautrock aesthetic. Here in NZ it got tied in with the other influences of the Flying Nun label in the early 80s to produce perhaps our most singular music,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3vgzxBrNHrw

60

When I lived in Germany in the mid '60's as a teenager I called one of my German friends Kraut. Man, did he get angry. Never heard the term Krautrock before.

61

"Krautrock" is a style descriptor like "acid rock," and doesn't refer only to nationality but is generally used to describe particular types of rock-based experimental music made in West Germany during the late 60s and 70s. in general, Krautrock bands aren't particularly interested in the bounds of song structure (though they can sometimes write and play incisive short songs) and tend towards long, droning improvisations that are at least as influenced by Turkish and Asian music as by Jimi Hendrix, whose influence in Germany was massive. they also typically lack a normal, mellifluous, pleasant singer, choosing instead vocalists who act more as another instrumental voice; the influence of 20th century experimental music, Kurt Weill, and/or the Jefferson Airplane are often apparent.

the best-known and most loved Krautrock band is certainly Can; it's a close argument whether they or Neu! (exclamation point obligatory) were most influential. Neu!'s 2/4 "motorik" beat, spacious atmospherics, and the howled proto-punk vocals on the third album set the stage for about 60% of post-punk; Can's endless grooves, self-orchestrations, episodic compositions (often edited down by bassist/tape editor Holger Czukay from hours-long jams), and the surreal mutter-to-a-scream vocals of mid-period vocalist Damo Suzuki prefigure post-rock and are reflected repeatedly in e.g. the Radiohead albums from Kid A forward.

other Krautrock bands that i really enjoy--i just know i'm going to forget someone important--include:

Faust. they really push the envelope in terms of leaning to the experimental side of the experimental vs. competency equation; as such, they probably reflect the influence of the Monks most of all the Krautrock groups, and have said so in the Monks documentary. not for the faint of heart.

Amon Duul II. starting out as a commune group with all and sundry plunking bongos, they split off (thus the "II") into a cross between Hawkwind, Wagner, After Bathing At Baxter's and a bomb going off. i highly recommend the Yeti album.

Ash Ra Tempel. the project of guitarist Manuel Gottsching, Ash Ra's first album is a total sonic attack project taking off from Hendrix which i've compared to sticking your head in a vacuum cleaner. LOVE IT. as the albums go by, Ash Ra becomes progressively less interesting, devolving to a New Age project. but hey, you might like that kind of thing. in the early 80s Gottsching also recorded E2/E4, a seminal piece of sequenced/processed music for guitar and synths that prefigured a lot of electronic dance music and is well worth hearing.

Popol Vuh. centered around keyboardist Florian Fricke, PV started as an early pioneer of what would later be known as ambient music; quite logically, they soon turned to soundtrack work, providing music for some of Werner Herzog's best-known films. In Den Garten Pharaoas is a lovely sonic journey.

Cluster. the duo of Dieter Moebius and Hans-Joachim Roedelius have made up Cluster since 1971; their work is instrumental, varying from long droning synth washes to cheery melodic ditties. i find both aspects of their work very enjoyable. for drony try the first album, which is sometimes called Cluster and sometimes Cluster 71; for the melodic stuff try Sowiesoso or Zuckerzeit. Cluster also recorded with Brian Eno a fair bit, both under the Eno/Moebius/Roedelius name and with Harmonia, the group M&R formed with Neu! guitarist Michael Rother when Neu! was on hiatus in 1975.

Harmonia. needless to say, the guitarist from Neu! + Cluster = two delightful albums, highly recommended.

it's arguable whether Kraftwerk and Tangerine Dream are Krautrock bands. i tend to think not because they departed from "rock" so completely, though Kraftwerk's first two, seldom-heard albums were in a very typical Krautrock vein.

-- macphisto

Excellent explanation! Thank you! I learned a new word as well, "mellifluous". :) I wish I had a mellifluous voice. :D

62

Here's my favorite, although the members are Nihilists...

63

Here's my favorite, although the members are Nihilists...

-- Judd

Only a country that brought the world Nazis could bring us a band like that. Not calling Kraftwerk Nazi's but I still think only a country that brought us Nazi's and brought us a Hugo Boss who designed the Nazi uniform could bring us Kraftwerk and Krautrock. Hey I'm part German, I'm allowed to say this, so don't accuse me of being against Germans! I am 100 percent American tho ... Don't make this controversial, I'm just saying ...

64

So what would bands like Rammstein and :Wumpscut be? Just German metal bands?

65

Here's my favorite, although the members are Nihilists...

-- Judd

Only a country that brought the world Nazis could bring us a band like that. Not calling Kraftwerk Nazi's but I still think only a country that brought us Nazi's and brought us a Hugo Boss who designed the Nazi uniform could bring us Kraftwerk and Krautrock. Hey I'm part German, I'm allowed to say this, so don't accuse me of being against Germans! I am 100 percent American tho ... Don't make this controversial, I'm just saying ...

-- Echosonic

This is what they do when they're not recording

66

oh dear

poor flea

parody has won again

karl hungus on organ and mellotron

67

oh dear

poor flea

parody has won again

karl hungus on organ and mellotron

-- neatone

"My-na dispatcher sez deres zomething wrong vith dyna kabel?? "

68

Here's my favorite, although the members are Nihilists...

-- Judd

Only a country that brought the world Nazis could bring us a band like that. Not calling Kraftwerk Nazi's but I still think only a country that brought us Nazi's and brought us a Hugo Boss who designed the Nazi uniform could bring us Kraftwerk and Krautrock. Hey I'm part German, I'm allowed to say this, so don't accuse me of being against Germans! I am 100 percent American tho ... Don't make this controversial, I'm just saying ...

-- Echosonic

Hm..the Nazie bastards have stolen so much cultur in their bloody era. I can (!) understand your point of view because your are outside of europe. But i would say the roots and attitude of bands like Kraftwerk are never the 30ies.

It´s coming from the 20ies of the last century In the 20ies berlin was a centre of modern culture. Painter, musicians, writer were all there and got their inspiration. The nazie destroyed so much in the 30ies. But they invented nothing. Kraftwerk played with this cool attitude but it´s based in the 20ies. Rammstein played with this Leni-Riefenstahl attitude. They say no but they do. I don´t like it. But Krautrock is so far away from nazie culture like Saddam Hussein being a texas farmer.

TGIF

69

Here's my favorite, although the members are Nihilists...

-- Judd

Only a country that brought the world Nazis could bring us a band like that. Not calling Kraftwerk Nazi's but I still think only a country that brought us Nazi's and brought us a Hugo Boss who designed the Nazi uniform could bring us Kraftwerk and Krautrock. Hey I'm part German, I'm allowed to say this, so don't accuse me of being against Germans! I am 100 percent American tho ... Don't make this controversial, I'm just saying ...

-- Echosonic

Hm..the Nazie bastards have stolen so much cultur in their bloody era. I can (!) understand your point of view because your are outside of europe. But i would say the roots and attitude of bands like Kraftwerk are never the 30ies.

It´s coming from the 20ies of the last century In the 20ies berlin was a centre of modern culture. Painter, musicians, writer were all there and got their inspiration. The nazie destroyed so much in the 30ies. But they invented nothing. Kraftwerk played with this cool attitude but it´s based in the 20ies. Rammstein played with this Leni-Riefenstahl attitude. They say no but they do. I don´t like it. But Krautrock is so far away from nazie culture like Saddam Hussein being a texas farmer.

TGIF

-- Brett65

@Echo and Brett- you two know what that is right???

72

Here's my favorite, although the members are Nihilists...

-- Judd

@Echo and Brett- you two know what that is right???

-- Judd

8-o What?


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