The Bass-ment

New to Bass

1

I'm thinking about picking up a bass and have been looking at (haven't held one yet) the Gretsch G6073 Electrotone. Any general opinions/firsthand experience with this model?

2

No comment on the G6073, but as a bassist, congrats on wanting to enter this world.

3

Agreed:D

And while I can't comment on the Electrotone, I can say the 5123-B Electromatic is FANTASTIC for about half the price. You still get TV Jones Thunder'Trons, the same bridge (from what I can tell), and real f-holes! (Not that that matters to everyone.)

I would at least consider playing one, as the locking tuners and strap locks would be a cheap upgrade to make it a comparable bass to the Electrotone. I personally don't find either of these to be necessary. The tuners are just fine, and I happen to like the staunch design of the screw-on strap buttons. Add a new TV Jones Harness and perhaps a Tru-Arc, and you've made a $1,000 "Korean Proline." I'm thrilled about mine, and It's relatively exclusive to boot ;-)

Those lovely f-holes!

4

Hi RBC no personal experience but I don't think you can go wrong with that. Hi Sean, got to love your eternal ENTHUSIASM for the 5123-B. If only they were availble over here . . Anyway once again welcome RBC, this is a top place for discussion and advice.

5

You know I can't stop raving about it! And by the way, I did see somewhere where a few are being sold over seas, I'll try to find the link...

6

So what do you think of the Basses with Bigsby? Will it rob any tone or sustain?

7

So what do you think of the Basses with Bigsby? Will it rob any tone or sustain?

– RBC

So what do you think of the Basses with Bigsby? Will it rob any tone or sustain?

– RBC

No.

This was supposed to be a 'secret', because I haven't organized all of the content for the thread yet, but I will (soon!) make a thread concerning this very issue!

Here's a teaser!:D

8

Sean what's the advantage of the tru-arc bridge? And what's a Bigsby?

9

Dinty,

HERE'S A LINK TO THE OFFICIAL TRU-ARC THREAD, but here's a brief(ish) summary:

The rocking bar bridge is standard on many Gretsch Guitars, and is one of the most beloved of all bridges for hollow body guitars. Here is what a stock Gretsch RBB looks like:

Bar bridges in general are said to increase sustain and reduce rattles due to their one-piece construction, as well as to add some nice tonal flavor, depending on the choice of metal used. The underside is rounded to create a rocking motion to assist in the use of a Bigsby Tremelo Tailpiece, which we'll discuss in a bit...

However, one problem with the Gretsch RBB is that the curvature of the bar itself is not exactly the same as the fretboard. Rather, it is bent in the middle of a straight, grooved bar, approximating the radius of the fretboard. While this "close enough" practice is acceptable to most, discerning (and to be honest some might say snooty and/or perfectionist) players find that their action suffered as a result of the strings not being the same height from E to shining E, which causes unfixable fret buzz on some of the strings when combined with silky smooth, ultra-low action. So...

The Tru-Arc Bar bridge eliminates this problem by starting with a solid piece of bar stock in the desired material, which is bent into the proper radius in it's entirety ensuring that when a bridge is cut from it, this hand-made, boutique bar bridge will have consistent action across all strings, eliminating this unfixable buzzing. The Tru-Arc Rocking Bar Bridge also has the honor of being standard equipment on the Duane Eddy Signature 6120. Here is a phot of a Tru-Arc CU-120B. This is one of only a handful of Tru-Arcs made for bass to date.

Tru-Arc bar bridges are made by Tim Harman, one of the members here on the Gretsch Pages. He goes by the name Proteus on the forum, and should be contacted via a Gretsch Pages Private Message for fastest response if you are interested in one of his bridges. (You are :) ) He will be more than happy to discuss with you the perfect bridge for your particular guitar, and will custom craft you a mini-masterpiece, just like you like it!

As for the Bigsby;

See the picture in my previous post. A Bigsby Vibrato Tailpiece, often mistakenly called a Tremolo, is what Bigsby claims to be the first "successful" vibrato device for guitar. It's basic function is to allow the player to add vibrato, a quick fluctuation in pitch, to a note or chord by gently releasing string tension via a rotation action as the player depresses the handle. The most common slang for this type of device is named for Leo Fender's later incarnation of the vibrato bridge, the "Whammy" bar. The main advantage of a Bigsby Vibrato over a Whammy type bridge is that while a Whammy bridge physically lifts up in the rear or the bridge when engaged, thereby lowering string tension, but also raising string action during use. The Bigsby's rotating motion means the string tension is effectively lowered while maintaining consistent action at all times.

10

So speaking of the Tru Arc bridge, do you think that Proteus will look into making one for a bass to compliment the use of a Bigsby (or just make the tone better without a Bigs)?

11

Absolutely! In fact, the standard Tru-Arc bar bridges are the rocking type for use with a Bigsby.

Alternately, Tru-Arc also has a "Rock-Solid" option, in where the "feet" of the bar are cut flat, so that it will sit squarely on the roller wheels of the base, and NOT rock back and forth. This would be the recommended option for guitars and basses with no Bigsby, and is the type that I ordered before adding a Bigsby to my 5123B.

12

You are a wealth of information. Glad to have you as a reliablr source. I think I'll wait a while before adding the tru arc bridge or the Bigsby. I don't seem to have the buszzing issue yet. If it becomes a problem in the future then I'll make the move. Talk to you again thanks a lot for all the help

13

LOVE my G6073. Sure, some of the upgraded features may not warrant the price tag compared to the 5123-B Electromatic, but it is a tonal monster that has become my main stage / studio instrument. However, I do agree you should hold one first, which may prove to be difficult. Even living in Austin, TX, it took me a hot minute to be able to find a professional series Gretsch bass in a shop somewhere. Also, check out the usual online auction sites ... I've seen random G6073's going for half of what they're worth ...

14

I've seen random G6073's going for half of what they're worth ...

highlandhouse

Yup. Can't lie, next bass purchase is probably a gently used Proline. A member here has a beautiful bass for sale, I might have to do it !#$@%

15

So .......What do you think about 119 g5123 b's available? I believe that Gretsch and FMIC are playing with us and many more of these have been made amd are sitting in a wharehouse somewhere. What say you?

16

The consensus that only around 100 of these were made is only applied to the first production run of 2010. All current information points to that number as being accurate.

The only concrete number ever given was that the second shipment of these basses coming to Guitar Centers contained under 100 units.

Considering there are only 200ish Guitar Centers, and so few of them actually receive a 5123 (even though some stores have sold several), I'd say that including a 2011 Run, it's entirely feasible to believe there are only about 200 or so of these in existence as of right now.

17

So .......What do you think about 119 g5123 b's available? I believe that Gretsch and FMIC are playing with us and many more of these have been made amd are sitting in a wharehouse somewhere. What say you?

– Dave Moore

So .......What do you think about 119 g5123 b's available? I believe that Gretsch and FMIC are playing with us and many more of these have been made amd are sitting in a wharehouse somewhere. What say you?

– Dinty

There are 3 or 4 on the walls in Detroit GC's alone.

21

Yay Pictures! Here's my current outfit:D


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